Skip to content

Pitch Perfect 3

Year: 2017
Directed by: Trish Sie
Starring: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Hailee Steinfeld, Brittany Snow, Anna Camp

Written by Livia Peterson

The Bellas are back for one final time! The ‘Pitch Perfect’ franchise has steadily endured franchise fatigue for the past five years and now their allegedly final tour definitely proved that the ladies are more than ready to return to reality and ditch the acapella dreams forever.

The Barden University student Emily (Hailee Steinfeld) reunites the Bellas, involving Beca Mitchell (Anna Kendrick), Patricia “Fat Amy” Hobart (Rebel Wilson), Chloe Beale (Brittany Snow), Aubrey Posen (Anna Camp), Lilly Onakurama (Hana Mae Lee), Cynthia-Rose Adams (Esther Dean), and Florencia “Flo” Fuentes (Chrissie Fit). Aubrey reveals the United Service Organization (USO) performance tour and if the group wins, they are able to open for DJ Khaled and the Bellas all agree to travel to Europe to compete to have one last victory. Upon arrival, the Bellas initiate a riff off with several bands competing for the prize. Of course, the Bellas perform acapella covers to demonstrate to the competition that they definitely deserve the triumphs regardless of the obstacles. While Gail-Abernathy-McKadden-Feinberger (Elizabeth Banks) and John Smith (John Michael Higgins) document and provide commentary, regarding the Bellas lives, the significant unnecessary subplot involves Fat Amy’s father Fergus (John Lithgow) re-entering her life and eventually betraying in return in more ways than one.

Jason Moore’s ‘Pitch Perfect’ boasts a brilliant and groundbreaking female driven narrative. Yet, the sequels – the second instalment helmed by Elizabeth Banks and the third and perhaps, final instalment directed by Trish Sie frequently feel more of the same without much return for the audience. Fat Amy still delivers the comic relief in the midst of Becca being the star of the show. The remaining Bellas are left in the background due to the story largely focusing on three primary, fully developed characters: Beca, Fat Amy, and more or less, Emily. It is indeed too difficult to resonate and root for the background characters when Beca and Fat Amy are always vying for one’s attention, whether it is leading the ladies in song and Fat Amy acting foolish. To add to the mess, the ladies have become stereotypes and one would consider this is a feminist film. The initial instalment absolutely praises feminism through acapella and yet, most characters are one dimensional, excluding the aforementioned three women here.

With lacklustre performances from the cast, and the music bordering on being intolerable, there are no redeeming factors for the Bellas this time round.  ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ checks all the bullet points of the predecessors, just to ensure audience approval and satisfaction. Not even an original song was written for this film. The only original song ‘Flashlight’, written by Jessie J, is featured in the second instalment. Indeed, the final instalment feels more like a live concert than a motion picture. If you’re craving a musical of some sort, resort the original or ‘The Greatest Showman’. Ultimately, ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ is a prime example of a money grab – regurgitating the previous two narratives and adding slight changes.

Whereas the first instalment possesses contagious energy, ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ completely lost the sparkle that made it magical in the first place. ‘Pitch Perfect 2’ retained some of the enchantment, if not neglected most of it along the way. ‘Pitch Perfect’ is the best out of the three even though the sequels attempted to surpass it with little success. Just goes to show sequels are not always necessary, especially for original content that should be left alone. Despite the Bellas being akin to a family, ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ indicates a possible spin-off as Beca becoming as a solo artist being hinted at during the conclusion. As if we asked for another ‘Pitch Perfect’ outing, assuming it is successful at the box office.

Aca-goodbye, ladies.

Livia’s Rating: 2.5/10

Advertisements

1 Comment »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: