‘Spider-Man’ Soars To $35m In Mixed Weekend: Box Office Report

Written by Dapo Olowu

After two weeks of no new major releases, we’d be forgiven for expecting ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ to open big this Box Office weekend, or at least break the $40m barrier.

Still, it swung in at $35.4m, meaning it takes the record as December’s biggest ever animated start anyway, beating out the likes of ‘Sing’ from 2016 ($35.3m). ‘Sing’ makes for an apt comparison – its $75m budget is just a shade under ‘Spider-Man’s $90m, and the musical’s eventual $270.4m domestic finish potentially signals a long, leggy ‘Jumanji’-like run for the Sony animation.

For such a run to be had, however, ‘Spider-Man’ must benefit from overwhelmingly positive word of mouth reviews – which it has in excess. Boasting 97% on the Tomatometer and an A+ on Cinemascore, the film, which stars the voices of Shameik Moore, Jake Johnson, Hailee Steinfeld and others, could breakout in coming weekends, although heavy competition in the form of ‘Aquaman’ and ‘Bumblebee’ should definitely stifle its attempts.

Internationally, ‘Spider-Man’ earned $21m from 44 markets, yet won’t be making the front pages just yet, due to the continued runaway success of Warner Bros’ ‘Aquaman’, which brought in a whopping $126.4m in its second weekend overseas.

To date, its non-U.S. total stands at $261.3m, and includes a DCEU-record $190m from China. To put this into perspective, it’s already Warner Bros’ second biggest film there ever (after ‘Ready Player One’), and only ‘Age of Ultron’, ‘Venom’, and ‘Infinity War’ stand in its way of becoming the country’s biggest superhero movie of all time.

With its U.S. release perfectly timed for this coming Friday, we could genuinely see ‘Aquaman’ swim to levels never before seen by the DCEU, and could even hit the $1bn mark.

With much smaller ambitions comes Clint Eastwood’s crime drama ‘The Mule’, which opened to a solid $17.5m. It’s an opening that marks Eastwood’s 5th biggest as a director, and 3rd biggest as an actor (inflation aside), as well as his biggest of the year, comfortably seeing out his February effort ’The 15:17 to Paris’ ($12.6m).

While many may balk at its seemingly pricey $50m production cost, Eastwood and those over at WB will be quietly optimistic at the potential for it grow in coming weekends, as it looks to appeal to a crowd uninterested in upcoming (and current) major action blockbusters. Its A- on Cinemascore implies a film highly-rated among audiences that were practically all (88%) over the age of 25, so perhaps we may see a ‘Book Club’-type performance here.

It wasn’t all good news in the Box Office, however. Universal’s ‘Mortal Engines’, the YA steampunk dystopian adaptation of the 2001 novel, failed to get started at the domestic Box Office, spluttering in with a miserable $7.6m.

Two things of note here: firstly, that ‘Mortal Engines’ has somehow outdone ‘Robin Hood’ as the flop of the season, and secondly, that Universal and co. decided it wise to spend $100m+ on a YA dystopian, as if ‘The Darkest Minds’, ‘The 5th Wave’, and ‘Allegiant’ haven’t already put the struggling genre out of its misery in recent memory. Regardless, it’ll be a real surprise to see this one reach $30m, or even be around by early January.

Finally, in the battle for 10th spot between ‘Green Book’, Deadpool-lite ‘Once Upon a Deadpool’, and ‘The Favourite’, it was ‘Green Book’ who prevailed and kept its place in the ranks, earning $2.8m in its 5th weekend of release.

Next weekend sees ‘Aquaman’ come up against the might of ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ and ‘Bumblebee’. Can the latter cause an upset, or will Warner Bros earn its 10th chart-topper of the year? Let us know your thoughts on Twitter and Instagram – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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First Trailer For Richard Linklater’s ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’ Released

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette is based on the runaway bestseller about Bernadette Fox, a Seattle woman who had it all – a loving husband and a brilliant daughter. When she unexpectedly disappears, her family sets off on an exciting adventure to solve the mystery of where she might have gone.”

Directed by: Richard Linklater

Cast: Cate Blanchett, Billy Crudup, Kristen Wiig, Emma Nelson, James Urbaniak, Judy Greer, Troian Bellisario, Zoe Chao and Laurence Fishburne

Release Date: 2019 (TBC)

Gripping First Teaser For Michael Matteo Rossi’s ‘Chase’ Has Arrived!

Earlier this year we sat down to chat with Michael Matteo Rossi for our ‘Sunday Spotlight’ feature. In the interview, Michael mentioned his excitement on an upcoming film he was preparing to shoot, which he described as “John Wick meets Drive”. Ever since then we’ve been keeping tabs on the film and Michael’s progress.

We shared an exclusive first look at the Chase back in August that showed the cast and crew hard at work and it hyped us up even more for what Michael had in store for us. Following our exclusive first look, we featured Rob Niter, who stars in the film,  in our ‘Sunday Spotlight’ feature and looked at his promising start to his acting career.

Now we’re pleased to share with you the first teaser trailer for Chase! The film is scheduled to be released 2019 and hit multiple film festivals.

Directed by: Michael Matteo Rossi
Cast: Damien Puckler, Jessica Morris, Aries Spears, Simeon Panda, Rob Niter, Paul Duke

JUMPCUT ALL THE WAY: Friday After Next (2002)

Directed by: Marcus Raboy
Cast: Ice Cube, Mike Epps, John Witherspoon, Terry Crews, Anna Maria Horsford

Written by Thom Marsh

I was going to write a huge diatribe about how this film deals with some serious socio-political issues as well as how some of the films’ more offensive jokes would be viewed in a “woke” society and move onto how much I dislike this holiday season (10 years in retail is enough to crush anyone’s festive cheer). Hence my choice of a rather unconventional Christmas film. However, as I sat down I found myself unable to contain my laughter however inappropriate the humour might be.

So sit back, relax.

Smoke em if you’ve got em!

It’s Friday. It’s Christmas Eve and Craig (Ice Cube) and Day-Day (Mike Epps) are back in Crenshaw where it all began. The film starts with ghetto Santa Claus, “picture ODB in a Santa suit”  breaking into our hero’s apartment and taking everything that wasn’t nailed down including the rent money hidden in the stereo. A genuinely funny slapstick routine with Craig ensues after he walks in to find aforementioned  Santa on the rob, the highlight of which being our hero getting beat down with a Christmas tree.

This provides the launch pad for the hilarity we’ve become accustomed to from the Friday franchise, although the absence of Smokey (Chris Tucker) is felt. The cameos of Joel McKinnon Miller (pre-Brooklyn 99’s Detective Scully) as Officer A. Hole, Terry Crews as the landlady’s “fresh out the pen” son Damon and Katt Williams as Money Mike more than make up for this factor. The latter of the trio provides us with some of the movies most memorable quotes. Money Mike screaming “pimp in distress” as he finds himself trapped under a shop mannequin will never cease to bring a smile to my face.

Like I said though this instalment is incomparable to the first Friday film from 1995. Which even now has me laughing from “it’s Friday, you ain’t got no job and you ain’t got shit to do.” However, it is considerably better than Next Friday (2002) which, as much as I love Ice Cube as a musician and now actor, I still find difficult to watch. I think the loss of Crenshaw as a backdrop to the film’s antics is a huge part of the problem. That and Epps as a replacement for Tucker without the calibre of supporting cast from this instalment just doesn’t work so well.

I’m not going to lie although technically yes this film is set at Christmas and it does teach the important lessons of “togetherness” and “family” that all good Christmas films should contain, I’ve definitely still watched this film in the middle of summer. I’ll never not find it funny to shout “you got knocked the fuck out” at the TV. Its antics make it one of those Christmas movies along with A Very Harold and Kumar 3D Christmas (2011) and The Night Before (2015), which makes it very stoner-friendly so would definitely recommend smoking beforehand.

Thom’s Verdict

3

The DCEU Movies Ranked

Written by Nick Staniforth

Braving the waters of the comic book universe once again this week, Warner Bros have supposedly turned back the tide and managed to deliver a superhero story that is getting unanimous praise for embracing its bonkers premise and surfing it to the shore of success. If you haven’t twigged yet, what with all the water puns, I am of course referring to Aquaman, the latest chapter of the DC universe starring Jason Momoa, Willem Dafoe, Patrick Wilson, Dolph Lundgren, Ludi Lin, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Temuera Morrison, Amber Heard, Nicole Kidman and Randall Park.

As of today, the man born of land and sea has made his way into cinemas, but following his release, where does the half-Atlantean sit among  Warner Bros. other highly debated efforts? Here be the rankin’ of the entire DCEU films so far that’ll no doubt cause some waves.


 

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Suicide Squad

It’s almost fitting that James Gunn has been tasked with a sequel to the film Warner Bros were keen to make their own Guardians of the Galaxy. Rough around the edges and filled with its own team of misfits, Suicide Squad had all the potential to be the outside contender that could straighten up the impending array of entries that were in the pipeline – instead, it almost ran the damn thing off the road.

A slung-together script, reshoots aiming to lighten the mood following the near-fatal feedback of Dawn of Justice (more on that later), and one of the shortest performances of The Joker ever caught on film, Suicide Squad was a slog of a viewing experience if it wasn’t for some key players that saved the day.

Margot Robbie and Will Smith as Harley Quinn and Deadshot reignite the chemistry they had in Focus, with the likes of Jay Hernandez’s El Diablo, Karen Fukuhara’s Katana and Jai Courtney as Captain Boomerang conjuring some compelling performances, but the outcome is still a visually murky slog that even with an impending sequel, is an instalment that rarely gets revisited.

 

 

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Justice League

Die-hard DC fans can hashtag the crap out of a campaign to release the Snyder Cut until the Parademons come home, but there’s no denying that the finished product of the Justice League was far from complete. The second that light touches the synthetic upper lip of Henry Cavill, things roll off to an uneven start for the film that should’ve been a team-up for the ages. Instead, we’re treated to a CGI-tastic tone tornado that was another close call for the end of the DCEU.

Snyder’s eyegasmic vision and Whedon’s wit colliding should’ve made for the perfect comic book film, but like Suicide Squad before it, Justice League ends up a drab and forgetful outing. There are glimmers of hope, with Jason Momoa’s Aquaman making his debut, Gal Gadot Gadoing what she’s great at, and that hair-raising moment Superman returns for real, but it’s just not enough.

That chase scene on Themyiscara still holds up but besides that, the rest of the film, for the most part, is a union of DC’s finest stuck together with PVA glue in front of an undeniably bland CGI backdrop. They should’ve entered a league of their own, but instead served as a grave injustice.

 

 

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Aquaman

A well-known horror director and a former horse lord are easily one of Warner Bros. bravest bargaining chips when it came to Aquaman and his solo film. Appearing as an undeniable redirection from the dark and sombre scope the DCEU has been focussed on for some time, Jason Mamoa’s standalone entry as the king beneath the ocean is one of the most refreshing instalments thus far, though not without its own issues.

Demonstrating that same flair he had with high-octane sequences in Fast & Furious 7, director James Wan gets his feet wet again in an at times visually impressive affair and tackles them to a degree, with Nicole Kidman as an ass-kicking Queen Atlanna being a standout moment. Sadly, these aren’t enough to wash over what is a fairly dull story that feels worn down. Plucking plot points from Thor, Black Panther and Wonder Woman, it avoids being a complete wipeout thanks to Momoa who is once again not giving a fork and having an absolute ball, which pushes the film along. Ultimately, it’s a good effort for DC to steady the ship but still not a patch on the best entry so far.

 

 

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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Tearing friendships apart as much as The Last Jedi, or when Ross and Rachel went on a break, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was the film we never thought we’d see, and ultimately the film fans will never, ever agree on. Considered to be the stuff of dreams and I Am Legend Easter eggs, the sought-after showdown between The Dark Knight and The Man of Steel is a battle on so many levels. For every hit it lands, there’s another counter swing that puts it on the backfoot, which is why its slap bang in the middle of this list.

Forming a bond in the opening act to the previous film amid the rubble and chaos left behind in Man of Steel, Snyder does a great job at building up the motivations for both fighters in this epic bout. Cavill once again slips into the super suit with ease as the still tortured Superman trying to find his place in the world, while Ben Affleck delivers one of the best iterations of Bruce Wayne and Batman ever captured on screen. Fearful of this stranger beyond the stars and being a figure worth dreading himself, it helps a great deal for when these two finally do go toe to toe. It’s the time spent getting to and following from the final fight that is the films biggest issue.

The Martha motive is still frustrating to even recall, as is Jesse Eisenberg’s weedy, tick-induced Lex Luthor. It’s a lengthy lost opportunity that we may never get back but thankfully gave the world Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman, the films most undeniable redeeming factor. If your chest doesn’t swell the second she flies in on Hans Zimmer’s score, then you really need to seek medical attention.

 

 

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Man of Steel

Ah yes, back when it all looked so promising. Snyder’s debut venture into the world of DC’s greatest heroes may have had its issues, but Henry Cavill’s first turn as the man with the big red cape is undoubtedly one of the strongest of the bunch.  Retelling the origin story of the most iconic superheroes ever for the modern era is a tough task but even more so when that beloved tale is tweaked to significant levels.

It all works, for the most part, aided by a strong cast that solidifies this world, and provides realism in a way that even Marvel still hasn’t done. From Amy Adams’ sharp Lois Lane to Michael Shannon’s tyrannical iteration of General Zod, every box is checked for the players involved in this effort to get Superman soaring to new heights. Most notably are the parents that mould Clark into the hero he becomes. Russell Crowe and Kevin Costner bring varied but vital fatherly roles as Jor-El and Jonathan Kent, respectively, while Diane Lane as keeps her son grounded as widowed mother MARTHA (sorry, old habit).

There are flecks of kryptonite littered through the film of course, most notably in that films final building breaking scuffle between Cavill’s Superman and Shannon’s Zod. Turning the shining Metropolis into an abandoned car park by the film’s end may well have been Snyder’s plan, but he once again spends too much time on something that should’ve zipped by faster than a speeding bullet. Not a bad first try – if only they’d been this good, though.

 

 

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Wonder Woman

There was only one place for Gal Gadot’s solo gig as the Amazonian princess to go and that’s right at the very front. Putting aside all the convoluted, reconstructed world-building that has been tried and tested, Diana’s first adventure is the closest to perfect Warner Bros. has been. Patty Jenkin’s take on the most well-known female superhero is an absolute treat from beginning to end, distancing itself from all the other entries by decades and finally giving audiences a film they could all agree on as being an absolute belter.

A fish out of water tale with added oomph, braving the era of World War I to bring Diana’s story to life is a refreshing chapter in an uneven series of instalments. Already demonstrating she could wield the headgear and lasso in Dawn of Justice, Gal Gadot gets time to really fit into the role of Wonder Woman and make it her own. Strong, graceful and an undeniable presence of good, she elevates every frame she’s in and makes the walk through No Man’s Land as iconic as Christopher Reeve circling the earth.

Taking the lead behind an equally charismatic Chris Pine who is in awe of his co-star as much as we are, she’s a breath of fresh air in a world that up until then was lost in its own self-manufactured smog. So the familiar final act may suffer some crash, bang and CGI wallop, but it’s redeemed by Diana’s heartwrenching goodbye to Steve Trevor that conjures the more emotion than any of the films that came before it. It’s a wonder we even got this, far but thank the gods we did.

REVIEW: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)

Directed by: Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, Rodney Rothman
Cast: Shameik Moore, Jake Johnson, Hailee Steinfeld, Nicolas Cage, John Mulaney

Written by Fernando Andrade

You know that feeling when you walk out of a movie knowing you have witnessed something special, something you have never seen before. That’s the feeling you get walking out of Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse. Even though it’s based off a comic book and this character has been done six times before and we know the basic story of Spider-Man, the people behind this movie found a way to make it fresh and have produced not only the best animated movie this year, but hands down one of the best movies of 2018.

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse centers around Miles Morales (Shameik Moore), aka Spider-Man. In Miles’ dimension Peter Parker (Chris Pine) is a hero to the people of New York, stopping crime at every corner and doing it with grace. That is until Parker has a run in with Wilson Fisk (Liev Schreiber) and his gang of other notable Spider-Man villains including Green Goblin and The Prowler. They have built a device which causes dimensions to collide in an attempt to bring back Fisk’s wife and son who where killed. In the exchange, Peter Parker is killed, yes killed in an animated PG movie, leaving Miles the one and only Spider-Man – so he thinks. Of course as the promotional material has shown us, several dimensions collide bringing with them other Spider-people with them. We have Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), Spider-Man Noir (Nicolas Cage), Spider-Ham (John Mulaney), Peni Parker (Kimiko Gleen), and Peter Parker (Jake Johnson) – but from a different dimension. It is up to the 6 of them to come together and defeat Fisk in order to return to their respective worlds.

This movie probably could not have come out at a better time, due to the tragic death of Stan Lee, as it shows the true power of comic books and why people love this character. While yes, on the surface this movie is a standard comic book movie pitting good against evil, heroes against villains, it is so much more than that. This character of Miles Morales is so pure and so easy to connect with. A lot of it has to do with the fact that he loves his family, he wants to make them proud, and he is just kind at heart. Honestly it was a nice change of pace seeing this familial interaction and not one having to do with Aunt May and Uncle Ben. This interpretation of Spider-Man also comes with a bit of a different message, although the presence of “with great power comes great responsibility” is still felt, here we get to see someone figure out that they have the ability to become something great and that you are never alone.

This is beautifully done through the brilliant use of all the other characters. Yes, some are used for more comedic purposes and some of the villains just show up, but they are not the main focus. However, all the characters fit, they all have their moments, and it works seamlessly to help tell Miles’ story. Each of the different Spider-people/animal have their own problem, their own origin story, and so do we as individuals – we all have different paths, which is why it is so easy to relate to this story. Sometimes it can feel very lonely out there, as Miles feels as his relationship with his family begins to dwindle as the piling amount of pressure he has to be a worthy Spider-Man builds. But it is through those same worries in which he finds the power to become who he was meant to be. This story has attempted to be shown in other Spider-Man movies as well, some being more successful than others, but the way it was told in this movie has been the most effective. We get to see a young, half black half Latino kid, dropped to this position where he must learn to face this massive challenge, with some pretty great people to help him along the way.

Not only is Into the Spider-Verse a beautiful story, the technical aspects on display here are some of the greatest ever in animation. This is probably what people felt like watching Toy Story for the first time seeing all those 3D animations, but in animation today all we really see is polished, hyper realistic worlds. It is a wonderful change of pace to see such a unique approach to animation, and it works so well with this story. This could never be reproduced into life action ever, it could only have been done this way.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse has come along and made itself known as one of the best movies of 2018, and should be leading the charge at the Oscars for best animated feature. Its a universal story that can be loved by everyone, filled with beautifully touching moments for both comic book and non-comic book fans alike, great laughs, and some pretty great music. This movie really showcases what minds like Steve Ditko and Stan Lee saw in these characters and what they wanted to express; a mask is a mask, but what really matters is who is underneath it – and that could be anyone.

 

Fernando’s Verdict:

4-5

JUMPCUT ALL THE WAY: Elf (2003)

Directed by: Jon Favreau
Cast: Will Ferrell, Zooey Deschanel, James Caan, Bob Newhart, Peter Dinklage

Written by Sarah Buddery

Arguably the greatest Christmas film ever, and easily the most quotable, Elf is the festive family staple that you’ll wish you could watch more than once a year.

Whilst Will Ferrell’s “man-baby” routine may be a little tiresome in some of his other more adult comedies, in Elf, it is perfectly pitched and suits the innocence and naivete of Buddy the Elf perfectly.

Elf is one of those rare, recent (although it is 15 years old this year!) Christmas films that has shown the test of time and still tops many people’s festive favourites. Everyone knows the story by now, but Elf follows the story of Buddy (Ferrell), a human who finds his way to the North Pole when he is just a baby, and is subsequently raised by Elves, believing himself to be one of them too. When he finds out he is in fact a human, and his biological Father lives in New York City, Buddy embarks on a journey through the seven levels of the candy cane forest, through the sea of swirly twirly gum drops and finally walks through the Lincoln Tunnel in search of his Daddy.

In the magical realm of New York, Buddy finds his family and tries his best to blend in. And this is of course when the hilarity of Elf kicks in. Elf succeeds in being consistently funny and delivering laughs and memorable moments in abundance. It has in fact been a Christmas tradition of mine for a few years now to attend the quote-a-long screenings at the Prince Charles Cinema, and nothing quite spreads the Christmas cheer like a room full of people (mostly adults!) screaming “SANTAAAAAAAAAAAA” at the appropriate moment.

Aside from Ferrell, this film has a host of other great performances, including one from a very young (and blonde!) Zoey Deschanel and James Caan, most well-known for being part of the Corleone family in The Godfather. A very different role in Elf, as you can well imagine, Caan is great as the put-upon Dad, and his onscreen relationship with Ferrell’s Buddy, is particularly wonderful.

Part of Elf’s enduring, endearing quality is that it has all the elements of a perfect Christmas movie. It is about as Christmassy as you can get, it’s full of jokes for all the family, and it delivers the perfectly wrapped message of Christmas spirit, believing in Santa, and the importance of family that really helps to cement it as a Christmas classic.

There’s not much more that can be said about Elf that hasn’t been said already. It is the staple of my festive film watching, and I’m sure it is for you too. Ignore anyone who says this is a kids film, it is a film for everyone, whether you grew up loving it or are a recent convert. It isn’t Christmas until you’ve watched Elf, so settle down with a bottle of syrup and get ready to sing loud for all to hear, “Santa Claus is coming to town!”

INTERVIEW: ‘Suspiria’ Spoiler Filled Interview With Prosthetic Make-up Designer Mark Coulier

Interviewed by Fiona Underhill

For our latest Sunday Spotlight, Fiona sat down to interview Academy Award-winning prosthetic make-up designer, Mark Coulier, who has worked on films such as Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel – for which Coulier won the Oscar for ‘Best Achievement in Makeup and Hairstyling’ in 2015,  Ready Player One, the Harry Potter series, and upcoming films Stan & Ollie and Pinocchio!

Fiona chatted with Coulier about his recent work in the Suspiria remake and the use of practical effects for some of its standout scenes, so there are spoilers ahead for those of you who haven’t seen the film yet!

You’ve been warned…


I have to start with what is a stand-out scene, from a make-up point of view and that’s the infamous scene with Olga in the mirrored dance studio, where she’s being contorted and twisted – how much of that was practical and how much was CGI? How did you achieve that scene?

So, I’d spoken with Luca (Guadagnino, director) about that scene quite early on in our conversations about the film and he wanted that to be a pretty brutal scene that establishes how dangerous the situation is and he wanted to, I think the word was ‘pulverize’ this woman and break her down so we talked about how to do that practically, we wanted most of it to be practical. I’d seen Deliverance, I mentioned this guy who gets washed down a river and his arm gets dislocated and it’s twisted round his shoulder and it looks pretty intense. We decided that would be a good place to start – to twist this woman’s arm around and break her jaw, what else could we do that would make her all twisted and contorted? He had this amazing dancer called Elena Fokina playing the part and she was able to do a lot of the stuff herself. So we started off with the arm and then we did the leg and the rib cage – we did a prosthetic chest piece for her and a jaw piece and we moved her teeth. It kind of built from there really and we tried to get her into this position at the end where she was completely broken down and twisted up. It was Luca who wanted her to look really destroyed.

So it sounds like it was heavily practical then?

It was all practical in the sense that it was prosthetic appliances, the visual effects side of it was that they removed her real arm and her real leg. I think they augmented the jaw being twisted into place. So I’d say it’s about 75% us and 25% visual effects.

I have to ask about the character of Dr Josef Klemperer (played by Tilda Swinton). I think the creation of that character, from the performance combined with the make-up is just absolutely phenomenal. I want to ask about how you built that character – I mean the detail on the face is just sensational – how did you achieve that?

Thank you. That was Luca calling up and I think he’d seen Grand Budapest Hotel and we’d done an age make-up on Tilda Swinton in that film and Luca wanted to see if it was possible, to see if we could turn Tilda Swinton into this old Jewish man. So we did a test make-up probably eighteen months before the film actually started, just to see if it was possible. The test make-up was totally different to the Josef Klemperer character that you see in the movie, but it gave Tilda and Luca an idea of what we could possibly do. It was an idea that Luca had that he wanted all the characters, the strong characters to be female. This idea of Tilda playing this part is linked to the idea of the three witches that are the core of the story – Mother Suspirium, Mother Tenebrarum, Mother Lacrymarum – and he wanted Tilda to play the three parts of Madame Markos, Madame Blanc and Klemperer. So that was it really, that was the start of it, so we did a test to see if we could possibly do it and we ended up re-sculpting it and re-making it and applying it to the finished character.

I heard a rumour that she even had a prosthetic penis, can I ask if that’s true?

That is true, yes. Well it was really more of a weighted thing that we put in there because she wanted to feel masculine, so she wanted to feel this weight between her legs. So I guess it’s a bit like Robert De Niro wearing silk underpants to play Al Capone. One of those little things that nobody else will see but it makes her feel more of the part.

I have to ask about the finale – how long did it take to shoot that sequence and what was the preparation, what were the decisions involved in that sequence? Again, how practical was it, how many buckets of blood did you use etc?

Yes, again, it was heavily practical. This is not a big budget, we had very little time for everything. We had nine weeks, we were supposed to have fourteen weeks, but we had nine weeks which is not a lot of time. We had full body suits – we did the character of Death, which is really intense and quite a  character to create. We had the character of Markos to do – the witch, which is also Tilda Swinton playing that character in full body make-up which is pretty intense. And we had all sorts of stuff – we had disembowelments, lots of crazy stuff that Luca wanted to create for that finale. And we sort of created a workshop out where we were shooting and I brought people over from the UK and we were just frantically building things and finishing things off while we were out there. As well as making stuff in the UK, we did a full body make-up on Chloe Moretz. We were supposed to do that for two days I think and we ended up doing that make-up for five or six days. So we were frantically building pieces and making pieces out in this abandoned hotel where we were shooting everything in Italy. And it was quite intense but it was quite practical, a lot of it was practical, a lot of visual effects augmentation of the self, the blood, the bodies being destroyed, pulling the intestines out. [spoilers] We had the dead Patricia, the dead Olga make-up, we had Markos – which was this big full bodysuit thing that we built for Tilda, who was also playing Madame Blanc in that scene. We had the make-up where she gets her head chopped off…or almost chopped off. So, again, it was about 75-25 practical – there was visual effects involvement. And when you read that stuff on the page and spoke to Luca about it, it was really hard to try and work out in your mind what Luca actually wanted, what was it going to look like, you know?

What was the detail like in the script, what were the descriptions like?

I think Luca just wanted it to be a descent into madness, which is at the core of the witches. This is all going to ramp up and the film builds slowly into this big crescendo at the end, with the Mother Suspirium character appearing in the movie and he wanted to give a sense of craziness and the evil that’s at the core of the movie, this sort of power of the witches and we were just trying to put that into visuals. It was quite hard to read it and understand what Luca wanted. When you see the movie, we’re like; “oh right OK – so this is what we were making! It was very interesting.”

I’m sure there’s surprises for you, even when you’ve worked on the film. When you see the finished product, you’re still surprised by it.

Yeah, more so than most films that I’ve ever worked on. There’s three movies I did last year, I did Stan & Ollie and Bohemian Rhapsody and I did Suspiria at the same time and I think the most surprising one out of all them is Suspiria. We make these sequences and we make the stuff, I remember Fernanda the hair and make-up designer, who did most of the ‘straight’ make-up looks said to me – she’d worked with Luca on a few movies – and she said “we just have to trust Luca, we have to trust our director.” It’s an interesting comment that she made – you’re making all this crazy stuff, how’s it going to look? She said; “We just have to trust Luca, he’s a visionary” he’s got this idea and when you see the movie, you understand. This crazy end sequence – the tension builds throughout the movie and then it all goes pretty wild at the end.

That’s the exact experience I had watching it, because I was skeptical going in, with it being a remake. But, as soon as it started, I thought, of course, it’s Luca, just trust in that vision and he absolutely has this precise vision and I think he totally followed it through with this piece.

Yeah, I felt the same way about it, actually. When you see the movie, we were busy out there making stuff, while he was busy filming all the stuff that didn’t have prosthetics in it, we didn’t see any of the dance stuff, the drama and the development of the witches’ characters. We weren’t privy to any of the filming of that, we were busy making stuff. So it’s always a surprise when you see the film at the end, I’d read the script and the story obviously and had all the conversations with Luca, so I had a pretty good idea of how it was going to develop, but it’s still quite surprising. And I really enjoyed it, I thought it was great. It’s a long movie, it’s slow, the tension builds, it’s really creepy and that end sequence. There’s a couple of sequences – the Olga dance sequence really grabbed me and I’ve seen it three times now and the audience is completely silent after that bit. Everyone is watching it thinking “my God, this is what the witches are all about – this is the evil at the core of the movie.” And you know then it builds quite slowly to that crescendo at the end, which really grabs you.


We ran out of time there (I had at least three more questions)! But I loved the movie and Luca created something truly unique with his team of master craftspeople, including Mark.

We’d like to thank Mark for taking the time to talk to us!

 

 

‘Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse’ To Swing In With $50m, While ‘Mortal Engines’ Can’t Get Started: Box Office Predictions

Written by Dapo Olowu

After two barren weekends without a major cinematic release, the theatrical cobwebs and tumbleweed will be brushed aside as three new films bring an end to the post-Thanksgiving void, and usher in the Christmas period.

Finally.

Kicking off the weekend is ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’, Sony’s latest foray into the world of Marvel’s most beloved hero after releasing the spinoff ‘Venom’ back in October. The film sees teenager Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) taking up the ‘Spider-Man’ mantle, after teaming up with multiple parallel-universe Spider-Men to defeat crime lord Wilson Fisk.

Its all-star cast, featuring the voices of Mahershala Ali, Nicolas Cage, Hailee Steinfeld, Jake Johnson, and Lily Tomlin among many others, is only bolstered by an equally strong team behind the scenes, with Lord & Miller producing, and the latter getting a co-writing credit.

The quality in production has apparently shone through to the final product; its near-perfect 97% on Rotten Tomatoes, A+ on Cinemascore, and 87 on Metacritic means it’s one of the best-reviewed superhero films in modern memory, perfect fuel for a great Box Office lift-off.

We’re optimistically forecasting a gross just below $50m from Friday to Sunday, considering the recent slew of family-friendly animations (and superhero movies) that have already quenched the thirsts of the general audience. It’s an opening that falls just behind another Lord & Miller production ‘The Lego Batman Movie’ from 2017, which made $53m in its first 3 days, on its way to earning $175.8m domestically.

Next is Clint Eastwood’s second film of the year after February’s ’15:17 to Paris’ – ‘The Mule’. Eastwood directs and stars as Earl Stone, an elderly drug trafficker (based on the true story of World War 2 veteran Leo Sharp). The film also sees Bradley Cooper as DEA Agent Colin Bates, alongside Laurence Fishburne, Michael Peña, Taissa Farmiga, and Andy García.

This R-rated crime flick has the better of ’15:17’ when it comes to critical reception, but this makes little difference for the $50m production, which looks to open at around $14m$1.5m more than ’15:17’. ‘The Mule’, it seems, will need to keep delivering the goods in coming weeks, or else get caught by the chasing pack.

What’s a Box Office weekend without a big budget flop? First-time director Christian Rivers teams up with Peter Jackson (‘Lord of the Rings’, ‘The Hobbit’) to deliver ‘Mortal Engines’, Universal’s steampunk dystopian based off of Phillip Reeve’s 2001 novel of the same name.

Fears of a ‘Robin Hood’-like failure are warranted, given its bloated $100m+ budget and poor response from both critics and audiences (28% on RT, B- on Cinemascore). Therefore, we’re predicting a start of $10.6m, meaning ‘Mortal Engines’ has already stalled upon release.

Finally, Oscar-hopeful ‘The Favorite’, directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, looks to beat out ‘Once Upon a Deadpool’ and ‘Green Book’ for a place in the top ten. Still in a limited release, playing in just 423 cinemas, the historical period-piece, starring Olivia Coleman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz, should earn $3.4m for 10th place.

The Box Office is back in full swing this weekend, with ‘Spider-Man’ leading the way. Will it hit the lofty $50m heights we predict, or will it just fall short? Let us know your thoughts on Twitter and Instagram – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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