CAMFF 2018: High Fantasy (2017)

Directed by: Jenna Cato Bass
Starring: Qondiswa James, Nala Khumalo, Francesca Varrie Michel, Liza Scholtz

Written by Elena Morgan

Four young friends go on a camping trip in the heart of the South African wilderness. The vast farmland they’re staying on belongs to Lexi’s (Francesca Varrie Michel) family and they document their adventures with their camera phones. Things take a strange turn when they wake up one morning and have mysteriously swapped bodies with one another, causing them to have to quickly learn how to see the world differently.

This young, diverse cast are brilliant. Each character is so unique, with their own characteristics that it’s pretty easy to tell who’s in whose body just by their mannerisms. There’s humour to be found in the situation as Xoli (Qondiswa James) finds himself in a woman’s body, but then the film also offers commentary on society as his experience makes him rethink how he talks about and treats women. Thami (Liza Scholtz) finds the body swap the most difficult as she ends up in Lexi’s body. She’s a politically active young black woman and to be suddenly in a white woman’s body is frustrating and disorientating for her.

High Fantasy offers a lot of talking points about different political issues in South Africa; race, gender, police violence, sexuality, but it never fully delves into any of them. These social issues are used to frame the problems this diverse group of friends face with not being in their own bodies – often to amusing and not really “politically correct” results. The situation allows for buried feelings to bubble to the surface leading to arguments between the friends. It’s uncomfortable to watch at times as differences these characters face due to their race or gender is brought to the forefront, leaving you unsure if these characters relationships can survive the madness.

High Fantasy blends realism with fantasy as the body-swap shenanigans ensue. It’s a film that has bold ideas, vivid characters and a creative filming style. High Fantasy is a lot of fun and the young cast and director/write Jenna Cato Bass have to be commended on producing such an innovative film.

ELENA’S VERDICT:

4

 

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CAMFF 2018: Roobha (2017)

Directed by: Lenin M. Sivam
Starring: Antonythasan Jesuthasan, Amrit Sandhu, Thenuka Kantharajah, Angela Chrstine
UK Release Date: N/A

Written by Elena Morgan

Roobha (Amrit Sandhu), a trans-woman, struggles to find her place after being ostracized by her family. Her chance encounter with a family man, Anthony (Antonythasan Jesuthasan), leads to a beautiful romance. But their blissful relationship soon comes crashing down for reasons not their own.

Set in the Tamil community in Toronto, Roobha is a romantic story that touches on the complexities of gender identity. At one point Roobha talks about Mata, “the goddess of transgenders”, who was once a princess but when she discovered her husband in women’s clothes instead of coming to her bed, she cut off his penis. Mata is a figure Roobha gets comfort from, along with the idea of the ancient rituals that turned men into women. Roobha wants to undergo gender reassignment surgery but the costs and social pressures are almost too much to bear sometimes.

Roobha finds comfort and sisterhood in fellow sex workers. They look after one another and with them she finds a family to fill the void of her biological family. With her new-found sisters, she meets Mai and David, an elderly couple who own the Chinese restaurant the girls frequently visit. They all call Mai “mum” as she takes care of them. One conversation between Mai and Roobha is heart-warming as Roobha gets the nurturing and understanding mother figure she’s needed.

The scenes where Roobha and Anthony are so soft in every sense of the word. The way they are around one another is so gentle and caring, the lighting is soft and gives them an almost romantic glow. These are two very different people, but they love each other dearly and that love shines off the screen.

It’s wonderful to see how Anthony’s understanding of Roobha and who she is evolves. Anthony is a lot older than her, but he is kind and sensitive. Both Jesuthasan and Sandhu give sensitive and touching performances, because of them you believe that Roobha and Anthony could be a loving and stable couple if there weren’t other factors affecting them both.

Roobha is a unique romantic story that shines a light on the transgender stigma in the South-Asian community. Some people can be accepting, other’s views can change, all the while Roobha is finding her own way and her own community.

Elena’s Verdict

3-5

Gremlins: Recall – The Mogwai Return in Fan Film

Written by Michael Dean

It’s been over 30 years since the 1984 film Gremlins, directed by Joe Dante, released to theaters bringing their cuddly Mogwai and horrific Gremlins to the big screen.  The film was such a success that a sequel followed in 1990.   A third film has been in discussion for years and has yet to gain any traction, so leave it to a director from Los Angeles who decided to whet the Gremlin fans appetite with a short fan film called Gremlins: Recall.

The film picks up 30 years after the events of the first film and the Mogwai can now be kept at your home as a pet, for a very large price.  However, there is a catch!  The owner must continue to medicate the Mogwai so they do not turn into those menacing green Gremlins.  So all should be fine right?  Well, as you will see from this story, something always goes wrong.

This fan film was written and directed by Ryan Patrick, who was a big fan of the original film.  So big that he went all out to bring this project to life by using high quality, animatronic puppetry for those pesky little gremlins.  Along with the fine puppetry are a nice soundtrack and solid casting with Katherine Rodriguez and Randy Irwin, which explains why the short film currently has over 182,000 views on YouTube.  I will admit, it was quite a thrill to see these creatures come to life once again and who knows maybe enough fan interest will get the ball rolling to get Gremlins 3 off the ground.

If you would like to learn more about how this all came together, be sure to head over to Ryan Patrick’s official website to view some behind the scenes footage as well as a director’s commentary, script, storyboards, photos and even download the soundtrack!

You can watch Gremlins: Recall below!

A Ghost Story

Year: 2017
Directed by: David Lowery
Starring: Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck, McColm Cephas Jr.

 

“What is it you like about this house so much,” asks M (Rooney Mara), insisting through her bemused expression that C (Casey Affleck) must respond. “History,” he says. They remain in disagreement. The ghost wanders through time, reflecting on past memories shared in their small countryside home. It’s a strange scene, and one that’s shot with the emotional sensitivity of a Spike Jonze movie, but it’s one of the only times that love and time were captured to such a moving degree.

The appropriately short A Ghost Story follows the life after death motif in the sudden death of M’s boyfriend, C. And the thing about death is that some things remain unresolved, if maybe a bit more mysterious than urgent. Death has been depicted and questioned in different ways, even though nobody *really* knows what it looks like. We don’t even know what it sounds like. Which is why David Lowery doesn’t attempt to answer those broken questions, rather, he grapples with what it means to be dead, a ghost.

The film begins with the loving couple flirting on their small living room couch as they cuddle under the romantic darkness of their isolated home. M notes the abrupt noises of the house often heard at nighttime, as she glances over at the mysterious white glow by the living room door. It’s ignored, as though some houses naturally live under a ghostly atmosphere, considering the deep history of each family that has come before.

M wants to leave in search of new opportunities in the city, but C is fixed on staying because of their valuable history. Unfortunately, M would have her way in the disturbing event of her husband’s death. What follows is a tragic tale of reconciliation between love and time. C is resurrected from his deathbed as a Ghost, invisible to the naked eye (not for the audience but the people in the film), and is burdened with the grief of losing someone who’s still alive.

Normally, there is nothing more tragic than losing a loved one to death, but A Ghost Story bravely asks whether the grief of watching someone move on is more destructive than having to move on from death itself. This is best demonstrated in one of the film’s most talked about scenes in which Rooney Mara eats an entire pie within a five-minute take. In the background, a tall and frail ghost watches from a distance as though its heart is ready to leap out in the hopes of comforting the once loving wife. Some hated the scene for its long duration – seemingly lacking purpose – but the strong effect is that of climaxing grief and hopelessness.

A Ghost Story is at its best when it exercises patience, examining small bouts of naturalistic grief in the form of emotionally nuanced performances. It all builds into one great moment half-way through the movie in which the music swells as M drives away from home. The film could end as of that moment and still receive the same review. What comes next is similar to that of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ in its provocative finale.

But really, A Ghost Story, even as it travels back in time, and portrays death to that of being a ghost, is a story about grieving the loss of a loved one and having to reflect on the relationship’s history. David Lowery has achieved what could only be described as a masterpiece, and one that explores love and time like no other film.

HUNTER’S RATING:

5

Mary & the Witch’s Flower

Year: 2017
Directed by: Hiromasa Yonebayashi
Cast (English dub): Ruby Barnhill, Jim Broadbent, Ewen Bremner, Lynda Baron, Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Morwenna Banks, Teresa Gallagher

Written by Sarah Buddery

Now reportedly ceasing to operate, the world is mourning the loss of Japanese animation giants, Studio Ghibli. But fear not anime fans, the spirit of Ghibli lives on, in the newly formed Studio Ponoc. Founded by former Studio Ghibli lead film producer Yoshiaki Nishimura, Studio Ponoc gained the support and allegiance of several Ghibli animators and directors, including the director of their debut movie, ‘Hiromasa Yonebayashi’.

‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ continues that Ghibli tradition of taking a classic (and usually English) children’s book, and giving it their own unique and fantastical spin. Whilst I would normally insist upon watching any anime film in the original language, the English dub of ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ that I saw was perfectly adequate; in fact the quintessentially British tones of national treasures such as Jim Broadbent, totally lend themselves to this type of story.

Whilst it might initially appear to be narratively similar to Ghibli’s classic ‘Kiki’s Delivery Service’, it does manage to be its own film, whilst still evoking the spirit of everything that makes these Ghibli classics stand out. ‘Mary’ actually owes more of a debt to ‘Harry Potter‘, and indeed the magical school that our protagonist finds herself in is very Hogwarts-esque; it surely can’t be coincidence that the students bear the colours of red, blue, yellow, or green either!

The story itself is quite simplistic, but then again it is for kids, and whilst the charming characters and easy-to-follow story will keep the attention of the kids, the beautiful animation will capture the older viewers as well. Voiced by none other than Spud from ‘Trainspotting’ (aka Ewen Bremner), the groundskeeper Mr Flanagan is an utter delight, and the only shame being that he doesn’t get enough screen-time.

Whilst this is enjoyable fare, it never feels like it has that timeless quality of some of the Ghibli greats. It does feel like a story that has been seen before, and its childlike innocence is pleasant enough not exactly world-changing.

Still, the animation is as stunning as you would expect, and the sense of magic and wonder permeates throughout. It also has adorable cats, and that is pretty much all you could want in any film. Regardless of the quality of the voice cast, watching these films with the English dub is utter sacrilege, so do seek out the Japanese language version for the most authentic and therefore enjoyable experience. ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ is enjoyable animated fare, and a great start for the new dawn of Studio Ponoc. Will certainly be watching their future efforts with great interest!

Sarah’s Rating:

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I Kill Giants

Year: 2017
Directed by: Anders Walter
Cast: Madison Wolfe, Zoe Saldana, Imogen Poots, Sydney Wade

Written by Tom Sheffield

The poster for this film depicts a young girl stood hammer in hand facing a giant with the words ‘from the producer of Harry Potter’ placed at the very top. Having not seen the trailers or read anything about this film beforehand (or even the graphic novel on which this is based), you’d forgive me for expecting some massive fantasy showdown between a teenage girl and giants on a similar scale to the Harry Potter series.

What I actually got was something I wasn’t expecting, but I loved it all the more for it…

Barbara (Wolfe) isn’t like the other children at her school. Rather than sitting at home watching TV, or gossiping about boys, 12 year old Barbara is out protecting her family, and the Earth, from giants. We soon learn these ‘giants’ are Barbara’s very imaginative coping mechanism after her mother becomes ill. Sophia (Wade) is new to the school and Barbara’s imagination piques her interest from the moment they meet – but as Barbara’s grip on reality begins to slowly slip away, Sophia must help her new friend any way she can with the aid of new school psychiatrist Mrs. Mollé (Saldana).

Madison Wolfe is an absolute tour de force. She delivers a truly wonderful and completely captivating performance that makes her one young actress you should keep your eye on! After her impressive role as the lead in ‘The Conjuring 2’, I am positive Wolfe will become a much more familiar name over the next few years if she continues to deliver such solid performances. Imogen Poots plays Barbara’s older sister, Karen, whose suddenly thrown into a caretaker role to her two younger siblings as their mother becomes ill. Karen struggles to balance work life with her new found responsibilities, and her unappreciative siblings only add to her troubles as it becomes clear that all three of them are trying to cope with their mother’s illness in different ways. Whilst Barbara is off defending the world from giants, her brother uses his videos games as means to escape from his real life woes, and Karen does her best to keep everything feeling as normal as possible.

Zoe Saldana’s Mrs Mollé doesn’t get a whole lot of screen time, but Saldana, who received her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame earlier this week, brings her A-game. Mrs Mollé tries her best to support Barbara through therapy sessions, but it’s clear to her that Barbara’s powerful imagination is having a detrimental effect on her school and social life, and her poor attitude and disrespectful nature towards teachers and adults in general stems from the fact that she thinks everyone will be thanking her in the end. Barbara’s personality traits mean that if her character was in any other film, she’d be that character you instantly don’t like – but because you learn more about her as her story goes on, you can’t help but sympathize as we see things from Barbara’s point of view.

‘I Kill Giants’ is Anders Walters’ debut feature film, and it’s an incredibly impressive and very promising start to his career. His direction and vision for this adaptation were a great combination for this screenplay, and despite the films small budget, the CGI is still fairly impressive. Knowing the CGI was never going to match that of ‘A Monster Calls’, which features similar themes and is being heavily compared against in other reviews, Walters cleverly uses the scenery and weather to conceal some of the giants flaws. That being said, the story at hand is much bigger than the giants and the mid-quality CGI was a non issue for me because I was much more focused on Barbara throughout the whole thing.

The cinematography really captures the theme of this film, with the surroundings often being bleak and uninviting, but Barbara and Sophia inject a lot of colour into each scene in the form of their clothing. The scenes that take place inside the school and forest in particular are some of my favourite shots because they’re a great representation of Barbara’s mindset at the time – for example there’s a particular scene where Barbara is scared and the whole school fades to black around her and you can really feel how isolated, alone, and scared she feels at that point in time.

‘I Kill Giants’ is available to download today and I would highly recommend you take some time this weekend to give it a shot. I think it’s a real shame this film never got a UK cinematic release, but at least no one will see your tears as Barbara’s story unfolds. As much as you may read about this film being compared to J. A. Bayona’s ‘A Monster Calls’ , I think both films stand firmly on their own merits and if you ever have a day you just want to let some tears out, here’s the perfect double bill for you!

Tom’s Rating: 8.5/10

We’re currently offering you the chance to win a free copy of this film over on our Twitter page!

Journeyman

Year: 2017
Directed by: Paddy Considine
Starring: Paddy Considine, Jodie Whittaker, Anthony Welsh, Paul Popplewell

Written by Dave Curtis

Paddy Considine’s first film ‘Tyrannosaur’ was not only a great debut as a director but it was also a stunning piece of film. Released in 2011 to a shower of praise from critics, it proved that Considine was a true talent in front of and behind the camera. It has taken nearly 8 years for his second film ‘Journeyman’ to reach the screen. So how does it fair up to his stunning debut? Directors second films are notoriously difficult to get right.

Paddy Considine this time writes, directs and stars in this gritty boxing drama. Considine plays Matty Burton; a veteran middleweight boxing champion who in a championship fight suffers a serious head injury which affects not only him, but those closest to him. Jodie Whittaker plays Matty’s loving wife and rock Emma.  This isn’t your average boxing flick, this is no Rocky 4 or 5. The fighting in  ‘Journeyman’ is not done inside the ring but outside of it. This isn’t an underdog tale or redemption story, which is truly refreshing. This is a story about going to the darkest place physically and mentally and then the journey back to recovery. 

The gift that Paddy has as director is that you can feel his passion for filmmaking and the subject of boxing. You can tell that he has a love for the sport and the boxing community. The injury that Matty endures is never laid at the feet of the sport. Rightly or wrongly his injury is just paved over as a terrible event. As a director who is still reasonably new to his craft; Paddy Considine has kept this a pretty simple looking picture. It feels unfair to compare ‘Journeyman’ to his first film ‘Tyrannosaur’ but every director gets compared to his last piece of work. It’s clear that he is a very talented director whose future work will be interesting to watch. But this could easily have been made for TV, like a really good ITV drama which would win loads of awards. It’s a shame that it just doesn’t feel very cinematic because the performances all round are outstanding and the script is nearly flawless.

Strong casting is the selling point to ‘Journeyman’. Both Paddy Considine and Jodie Whittaker put in stellar performances. Great chemistry goes a long way and both these leads carry the film. Paddy Considine has seriously been underrated on these shores and in Hollywood for far too long, he should have been given a role like this year ago. Maybe that’s why he wrote the part for himself. Considine is believable as an aging boxer and he does a descent job playing a character with serious head injuries. In the wrong hands it could have gone very wrong.

Jodie Whittaker’s stock continues to rise. Here she carries the film. As Matty’s wife Emma, she plays the role with so much heart, the viewer feels exactly what you should be feeling. Her life has been turned upside down and it’s down to her performance that grounds the whole film. The tears and sadness seem so real, my tears definitely were. For ‘Doctor Who’ fans it’s very exciting to see such a great actress about to play such an important and iconic TV character.

‘Journeyman’ gives a punch right to your gut. A film that will take you to the darkest areas of your mind but leaves you with hope and love. Considine and Whittaker’s strong performances are reminders that we have some great talent in British cinema. Hopefully it doesn’t take another 8 years to get Paddy Considine behind a camera again. That would be a shame.

Dave’s Rating: 7.0/10

Veronica

Year: 2017
Director: Paco Plaza
Starring:  Sandra Escacena, Bruna González, Claudia Placer

Written by Abbie Eales


Set in Madrid in 1991 and based (extremely loosely) on true events, ‘Veronica’ tells the chilling supernatural tale of the 15 year-old titular heroine and a series of unexplained events taking place over a few days.

Veronica is the carer for her three younger siblings, while their mother is mostly absent, a fleeting figure in their lives who spends her days and nights working in a local bar since the death of the childrens’ father. While Veronica’s friends are experimenting with smoking and boys Veronica is left with the mundane role of young carer, cleaning, cooking and acting as babysitter to her siblings.

The film is set in familiar horror territory; an eclipse and a convent school. Scary nuns and the world being plunged into darkness provide a solid start for supernatural horror. Amidst this backdrop Veronica and her friend (with interloper to the friendship and experienced older girl Diana)  try to contact Veronica’s dead father through a ouija board in the basement of the school. Very quickly the seance takes an unsettling turn and Veronica has a terrifying seizure.

Veronica finds herself in the school nurse’s office where the event is explained away as anemia or low blood pressure, leading her to reveal she has not yet had her first period. Thus we stumble into the real main theme of the film, the changing pubescent female body, which has long been a source of great fascination and horror.

Paco Plaza keeps with the urban high rise setting of his previous films ‘[REC]’ and ‘[REC 2]’ (which are two films which I find genuinely chilling) to great effect. Employing a ‘Rear Window’ approach to exploring Veronica’s own stunted teenage years he shows the stark contrast of a teenage girl in a neighbouring building who is enjoying all the normal teenage freedoms of dancing, making out and being looked after. Meanwhile our heroine slowly unravels under the weight of responsibility of being parent to her much younger siblings while tackling her own changing body, forcing her to straddle the two worlds of childhood and adulthood.

While the film could be viewed as another ouija board driven supernatural horror, an alternative explanation for events is firmly apparent, making ‘Veronica’ far more compelling viewing than many of it’s horror counterparts. Veronica’s mother uttering ominously “I need you to grow up” framing the narrative for the rest of the film.

Sandra Escacena is mesmorising in the title role, managing to capture both child-like innocence and a building anger and passion, all the torment of hormonal teenage years coming out in rage filled bursts, which may or may not be related to a summoned demon. Her siblings  are also superb, with the two bickering twin sisters Irene and Lucia (played by Bruna Gonzalez and Claudia Placer) displaying sass and verve, while young Antonito (Ivan Chavero) manages to be supremely cute without being irritating.

The special effects are largely practical and in-camera, which is when the projection of Veronica’s haunting is at it’s most effective. Indeed the appearance of the children’s father is an image that will remain with me for a long time. Some appearances of the spirit are a little hokey, but these are always the moments when we see the horror through the childrens’ eyes.

The real test of effective horror isn’t so much the experience while viewing, but what it does to you afterwards and somehow Veronica got firmly under my skin, making me sure I’d firmly locked my doors before going to bed.

Like ‘The Babadook’ and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ before it, ‘Veronica’ works best when it is rooted in the claustrophobia of family life and the terror of both childhood and adulthood. The hokum of being based on true events should remain secondary to what is an excellent piece of coming of age horror.

Abbie’s Rating: 8.5 out of 10


 

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle

Year: 2017
Director: Jake Kasdan
Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan, Jack Black, Nick Jonas, Alex Wolff, Madison Iseman, Morgan Jeanette Turner, Ser’Darius Blain, Bobby Cannavale

Written by Rhys Bowen Jones

Back when it was first announced, I couldn’t help but ask the question “did this really need to happen?” I have an affinity for the original ‘Jumanji’ an old-school adventure film with one of my favourite actors of all time, Robin Williams, in an against-type role with fun characters and a great premise. Sure, it’s cheesy and the effects are a little dodgy, but it was a film I grew up with (I was 3 when it came out), and for my money it still holds up to this day as a fun film. ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ felt completely unnecessary, unless it could bring something new to the table. I’m happy to report that my initial fears were left unfounded as I had a very good time with ‘Welcome to the Jungle.”

We start with four high school students Spencer (Wolff), Fridge (Blain), Bethany (Iseman), and Martha (Turner) finding themselves in detention for various misdemeanours. They are tasked with de-stapling old magazines to be made safe for recycling in the dark basement of the school when they discover an old games console, not unlike a classic SEGA Megadrive. It has a game already plugged in, so Spencer sets the console up on an old TV and they all agree to play to kill some time instead of doing their detention. The game in the console is, of course, Jumanji, which has metamorphosised into a video game because “who plays board games anymore?”. Such is Jumanji’s wont, the four students get literally sucked into the game and assume new roles based on their character selection. To escape, they must complete the game. Simple.

When ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ works, it really works. Our four proper leads once in the game are clearly having a boatload of fun. Dwayne Johnson is the charismatic leader but with the mind of a nervous, nerdy teen; Kevin Hart is a small, side-kick with the mind of a jock, leader-type; Karen Gillan is a badass martial artist with the mind of a self-conscious, shy teen; and Jack Black is a middle-aged cartography specialist with the mind of a popular, ‘Mean Girls’ teen. All four actors are playing somewhat against type, having to think “what would my teenage character do” in any given situation. It serves both as a functional sequel, and a pleasant coming-of-age story. ‘Welcome to the Jungle’s’ writers manage to balance this very well.

Many of the film’s highlights come from the team bickering and working together. They all have to reluctantly follow Spencer because his character is over-powered beyond belief, which creates division amongst Spencer and Fridge, but they all serve a purpose within the world. Bethany can do things the others can’t which helps them advance further in the game, the same can be said for all four of them. The film does a great job of giving every character agency and a role in the game.

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It is worth addressing, too, that given the current crowd of video game film adaptations (most recently the disastrously boring ‘Assassin’s Creed’ adaptation), ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ has stumbled into being arguably the best video game film ever. It has fun with the rules it sets for itself, it makes jokes about game clichés and embraces them, and several scenes felt reminiscent of games I’ve played in the past (‘Far Cry’, the new ‘Tomb Raider’ games).

That said, it does occasionally create new rules on the go in order to write themselves out of a situation (I can’t think of many games that allow you to “share” your lives with another character, for example), and there is the odd internal logic jump that doesn’t really make sense (no game ever forces you to have to die in order to complete a mission), but that is coming from someone who has been gaming for years. They are small nitpicks in the grand scheme of things.

Further, ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ boasts a phenomenally bad villain (Cannavale), who barely even registers as a threat, and is another cause for plot-related concern. Early on, they are forced to watch a cut-scene, standard procedure in gaming, to explain the plot of the game. Later, while our heroes are traversing the jungle, it cuts to show Cannavale plotting his next move. Can our characters see this? Is the game-world alive and changing around them all the time? Again, not huge issues in the bigger picture, but they were certainly issues I raised internally.

All in all, though, ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ is supremely entertaining. The film lives and dies by its four main characters and they are up to the challenge of making it as fun as they can. Karen Gillan and Jack Black are the personal standouts (I never knew the world needed a scene in which Black teaches Gillan how to flirt, but I’m all the happier for it), but all of them are great. It’s a shame about the villain and the plot-holes that show up every so often, but I had a great time watching ‘Welcome to the Jungle,’ the most surprisingly good film of 2017.

Rhys’ Rating: 7.1/10