Reel Women: December UK Releases

Welcome back to Reel Women, the monthly feature that highlights the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. This month we’ve got a couple of Netflix releases, some foreign language films, and the latest offering from the Transformers franchise. There’s plenty to tide you over this holiday season.

 

7 December

Dumplin’
Directed by: Anne Fletcher
Written by: Kristin Hahn

Based on the YA novel by Julie Murphy, Dumplin’ (Danielle Macdonald) is the plus-size daughter of a former beauty queen (Jennifer Aniston) who signs up to her mum’s pageant as a protest. But soon things escalate as others follow in her footsteps.

Anne Fletcher is an actress, producer and director. Dumplin’ is her seventh film and some of her previous films include The Proposal (2009) and Step Up (2006). Kristen Hahn is a director, writer and producer, Dumplin’ is her second produced screenplay.

 

Tulip Fever
Directed by: Justin Chadwick
Written by: Deborah Moggach and Tom Stoppard

An artist falls for a young married woman while he’s commissioned to paint her portrait during the Tulip mania of 17th century Amsterdam.

Deborah Moggach is a film and television screenwriter and wrote the novel Tulip Fever is based on. In 2006 her adapted screenplay of Pride & Prejudice was nominated for a BAFTA

 

Mug
Directed by: Malgorzata Szumowska
Written by: Michal Englert and Malgorzata Szumowska

When Jacek (Mateusz Kosciukiewicz) undergoes a face transplant, he suffers identity issues as he struggles to find his place again in the tight knit community he’s from.

Mug is Malgorzata Szumowska’s seventh feature film and at this year’s Berlin International Film Festival it was nominated for the Golden Berlin Bear and won the Jury Grand Prix. Szumowska has won 25 awards and has another 30 nominations to her name.

 

Theatre of War
Written & Directed by: Lola Arias

A documentary that reveals the personal stories of both British and Argentinean former soldiers whose lives were deeply affected by the Falklands war.

Theatre of War is Arias’s first film.

 

8 December

Mortal Engines
Directed by: Christian Rivers
Written by: Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens and Peter Jackson

Set in a dystopian future where all cities are constantly moving across the Earth on wheels, Hester Shaw (Hera Hilmar) fights for revenge for her mother’s murder.

Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens have collaborated with Peter Jackson previously on King Kong (2005), the Hobbit trilogy, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. They both won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003).

 

12 December

Out of Many, One
Directed by John Hoffman and Nanfu Wang

Documentary about immigration has become a divisive issue in the United States.

Nanfu Wang is a director, editor, cinematographer and producer.

 

14 December

Free Solo
Directed by: Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi

A documentary about Alex Honnold, the first person to ever free solo climb Yosemite’s 3,000ft high El Capitan Wall.

Free Solo is Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi’s sixth feature-length documentary. Her previous film Incorruptible (2015) is currently on Netflix.

 

21 December

Bird Box
Directed by: Susanne Bier
Written by: Eric Heisserer

After a mysterious event leaves the world in fear, Malorie (Sandra Bullock) and her two children must travel through a forest blindfolded in order to survive.

Susanne Bier has over 20 directing credits to her name and she’s also a writer and producer. In 2016 she won an Emmy for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or a Dramatic Special for her work on The Night Manager.

 

24 December

Bumblebee
Directed by: Travis Knight
Written by: Christina Hodson

Set in the 1980’s, a teenage girl finds and befriends Bumblebee, an alien robot from another planet.

Bumblebee is Christina Hodson’s third produced screenplay. Her next screenplay is Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn).


That’s nine films made by women released this month – three of them are on Netflix. As always, we’d love to hear what you think of any of these films if you get the chance to see them. We’ll see you next year as we continue to shine a spotlight on female filmmakers.

Reel Women: November UK Releases

Welcome back to Reel Women, the monthly feature that highlights the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. The clocks have gone back, it’s dark and cold outside, so what better way to spend the dark evenings than in the cinema?! This month there’s dramas, rom-coms and the start of the Christmas-themed releases. Oh, and there’s a little film about wizards and another small animated film featuring well-known Disney characters.

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2 November

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

Directed by Lasse Hallström and Joe Johnston
Written by Ashleigh Powell and Tom McCarthy

When Clara (Mackenzie Foy) is transported to a magical world of her mother’s making, she’ll do anything to protect it.

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms is Ashleigh Powell’s first produced screenplay. She’s attached to adapt the books The Paper Magician and The Hazel Wood into screenplays.

 

Juliet, Naked

Directed by Jesse Peretz
Written by Evgenia Peretz, Jim Taylor and Tamara Jenkins

After Annie (Rose Byne) breaks up with Duncan (Chris O’Dowd), she embarks on an unlikely romance with a famous singer-songwriter who happened to be Duncan’s favourite musician.

Tamara Jenkins is a writer-director who was Oscar nominated for her original screenplay The Savages (2007). Her latest film, Private Life, is a new Netflix Original. Evgenia Peretz is a writer and producer, Juliet, Naked is her second produced screenplay.

 

King of Crime

Directed by Matt Gambell
Written by Linda Dunscombe

The biggest player in British cyber-crime goes head to head against some Islamic extremists by playing the biggest scam of his life.

As well as writing King of Crime, Linda Dunscombe was also a producer on the film, and the films casting director.

 

 

6 November

Widows

Directed by Steve McQueen
Written by Gillian Flynn and Steve McQueen

Four women whose dead husbands’ criminal actives leave them in trouble, conspire to come together to survive the forces that are out to get them.

Gillian Flynn is an author and screenwriter who adapted her own novel, Gone Girl (2014) to critical acclaim earning her a Golden Globe nomination.

 

 

9 November

Wildlife

Directed by Paul Dano
Written by Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan

A boy witnesses his parents’ (Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal) marriage fall apart.

Zoe Kazan is an actress and screenwriter whose acting credits include What If (2013), Meek’s Cutoff (2010) and The Big Sick (2017). Her previous screenplay was Ruby Sparks (2012) in which she played the titular role.

Our review

 

Outlaw King

Directed by David Mackenzie
Written by Mark Bomback, Bathsheba Doran, David Harrower, James MacInnes and David Mackenzie

The story of how Scottish Robert The Bruce (Chris Pine) fought to defeat and repel the much larger occupying English army.

Outlaw King is Bathsheba Doran’s first feature film, but she’s written episodes of multiple TV shows including Broadwalk Empire and Masters of Sex.

Our review

 

The Other Side of Everything

Directed by Mila Turajlic

A documentary about Serbian filmmaker Mila Turajlic, who learns more about her family history and her country’s tumultuous political inheritance after opening a locked door in her mother’s apartment in Belgrade.

Mila Turajlic is a producer and director who was also the cinematographer for The Other Side of Everything.

 

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16 November

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Directed by David Yates
Written by J.K. Rowling

Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law) tasks Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) to take down Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp) who believes wizards are better than muggles.

J.K. Rowling needs no introduction. After writing the Harry Potter book series that turned into a global phenomenon, Rowling is now the writing the screenplays for the Fantastic Beasts series.

 

The Princess Switch

Directed by Mike Rohl
Written by Robin Bernheim and Megan Metzger

Netflix’s first Christmas themed film of the year, The Princess Switch is about how one week before Christmas, Margaret, the gorgeous Duchess of Montenaro, switches places with Stacy, a “commoner” from Chicago, who looks exactly like her.

Robin Bernheim is a writer and producer of films and TV shows including Quantum Leap and Star Trek: Voyager. The Princess Switch is Megan Mertzger is first produced screenplay.

 

Hell Fest

Directed by Gregory Plotkin
Written by Seth M. Sherwood, Blair Butler and Akela Cooper

A masked serial killer turns a horror-themed amusement park into his own personal hunting ground.

Blair Butler is a writer, director and producer. Hell Fest is her first feature film. Hell Fest is Akela Cooper’s first feature film screenplay as well but she has written multiple episodes of the TV shows Grimm, Luke Cage and The 100.

 

 

23 November

Back to Berlin

Directed by Catherine Lurie-Alt

Documentary about eleven motor bikers have a mission to take the Maccabiah torch from Israel to the site of the infamous 1936 Berlin Olympics, for the first Jewish Olympic Games on German soil.

This is Catherine Lurie-Alt’s first film.

Nativity Rocks!

Written & Directed by Debbie Isitt

The fourth film about St Bernadette’s Primary School in Coventry and the staff and students there who audition for a coveted place in a spectacular Christmas rock musical competition.

Debbie Isitt has written and directed all four Nativity films – the first two films, starring Martin Freeman and David Tennant, are on Netflix if you fancy getting into the Christmas spirit early.

The Judge

Directed by Erika Cohn

Documentary about Judge Kholoud Al-Faqih, the first woman appointed to a Shari’a court in the Middle East.

Erika Cohn is a producer and writer and The Judge is her second feature-length documentary.

 

 

30 November

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Directed by Phil Johnston and Rich Moore
Written by Phil Johnston and Pamela Ribon

Ralph and Penelope discover the internet and go on a whole new adventure.

Pamela Ribon is an actress, producer and writer whose previous screenwriting credits include Smurfs: The Lost Village (2017).

 

Disobedience

Directed by Sebastián Lelio
Written by Sebastián Lelio and Rebecca Lenkiewicz

Ronit (Rachel Weisz) returns home to her Jewish community after being shunned by them years before for her attraction to a female friend. When Ronit and Esti (Rachel McAdams) meet again their passions reignite.

Disobedience is Rebecca Lenkiewicz’s second feature film. Her previous film was Oscar winner Ida (2013) and her next film is Colette starring Keira Knightley which is released in the UK early next year.

 

The Wild Pear Tree

Directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
Written by Akin Aksu, Ebru Ceylan and Nuri Bilge Ceylan

An aspiring writer returns to his native village, where his father’s debts catch up to him.

Ebru Ceylan is a writer and director whose debut short film Kiyida (1998) was nominated for the Palme d’Or for Best Short Film at Cannes Film Festival. The Wild Pear Tree is her third feature-length screenplay.


And that’s it for this month’s Reel Women. That’s 16 films from a wide range of genres that are released in the UK that are made by women in November. Do let us know what you think of any of these films if you get a chance to see them – some might be easier to find than others!

Reel Women: October UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

Welcome back to Reel Women, the monthly feature that highlights the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. October is London Film Festival month and 38% of the films on show there are directed by women, so if you get the chance to attend the festival, try and see the hidden gems on offer. But if you’re not at the festival, there’s still films being released in cinemas and on Netflix this month that are made by women. This month we’ve got Netflix originals, documentaries, book adaptations and an anti-hero superhero movie.

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3 October

Venom

Directed by Ruben Fleischer
Written by Scott Rosenberg, Jeff Pinker, Kelly Marcel and Will Beall

When reporter Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) acquires the powers of an alien symbiote, he finds he’s not alone in his own mind and body anymore.

Kelly Marcel is a screenwriter, producer and actress. Her previous screenwriting credits include Fifty Shades of Grey and Saving Mr. Banks.

 

 

5 October

A Thousand Girls Like Me

Directed by Sahara Mani
Written by Giles Gardner and Sahra Mani

Documentary about Kjatera, a 23-year-old Afghan woman, tells the story of how she was sexually abused by her father on national TV. She’s seeking punishment for her perpetrator and to shed light onto the faulty Afghan judicial system.

A Thousand Girls Like Me is Sahara Mani’s first film, as well as writing and directing it she also produced it.

 

Jalouse

Written and Directed by David Foenkinos and Stéphane Foenkinos

A divorced teacher suddenly becomes jealous of everyone, including her daughter, friends and neighbours.

Stéphane Foenkinos is an actor, writer, director and casting director. Jalouse is her second feature film, her first film Delicacy was nominated for Best First Film at the 2012 César Awards.

 

Kusama: Infinity

Directed by Heather Lenz
Written by Heather Lenz and Keita Ideno

Documentary about artist Yayoi Kusama who, along with experts, discuss her life and work.

This is Heather Lenz’s first feature-length documentary, as well as writing and directing it, she also edited and produced it. Kusama: Infinity was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival earlier this year.

 

Private Life

Written and Directed by Tamara Jenkins

Author Rachel (Kathryn Hahn) and her husband Richard (Paul Giamatti) are going through multiple fertility treatments and it’s putting pressure on their relationship.

New to Netflix, Private Life is Jenkins’ third feature film. She was nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for her previous film The Savages (2007).

 

 

12 October

Smallfoot

Directed by Karey Kirkpatrick and Jason Reisig
Written by Karey Kirkpatrick and Clare Sera

Animated adventure about a yeti is convinced that the elusive creatures know as humans, or smallfoots, really do exist.

Clare Sera is an actress, director and screenwriter. Her previous screenplay was the Drew Barrymore and Adam Sandler comedy film Blended.

 

Pili

Written and Directed by Leanne Welham

Pili (Bello Rashid) lives in rural Tanzania, working the fields for less than $1 a day to feed her two children and struggling to manage her HIV-positive status in secret. When she is offered the chance to rent a sought-after market-stall, Pili is forced to make increasingly difficult decisions in order to get the stall.

Pili is Leanne Welham’s first feature film as well as writing and directing it she also produced it. Previously she has directed five short films.

 

 

13 October

Make Me Up

Written and Directed Rachel Maclean

Siri wakes to find herself trapped inside a brutalist candy-coloured dreamhouse. Despite the cutesy decor, the place is far from benign, and she and her inmates are encouraged to compete for survival.

Make Me Up is Rachel Maclean’s second feature film. She edited it, acted it and was the production designer for the film.

 

 

19 October

Science Fair

Directed by Cristina Constantini and Darren Foster
Written by Cristina Costantini, Darren Foster and Jeff Plunkett

Documentary about nine high school students from around the world competing in an international science fair.

Science Fair is Cristina Constantini’s first film.

 

Touch Me Not

Written and Directed by Adina Pintilie

A documentary about filmmaker Pintilie as she and her characters venture into a personal research project about intimacy.

Touch Me Not is Adina Pintilie’s first feature film and has won both the Best First Feature Award and the Golden Berlin Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year.

 

 

22 October

The Hate U Give

Directed by George Tilman Jr.
Written by Audrey Wells

Starr (Amanda Stenberg) has two lives, one in her community and one in her private school. Those two lives come crashing down when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend by a police officer, and Starr must find her voice and stand up for what’s right.

Audrey Wells is a screenwriter and director. The Hate U Give is her ninth produced screenplay and it is an adaptation of the critically-acclaimed novel by Angie Thomas.

 

 

26 October

Utøya – July 22

Directed by Erik Poppe
Written by Siv Rajendram Eliassen and Anna Bache-Wiig

Teenager Kaja (Andrea Berntzen) struggles to survive as she searches for her younger sister during the July 2011 terrorist mass murder at a political summer camp on the Norwegian island of Utøya.

Anna Bache-Wiig is an actress and writer. Utøya – July 22 is her first feature film; however, she’s written a number of episodes of the TV show Acquitted which she also starred in.

 

Shirkers

Written and Directed by Sandi Tan

A documentary about Sandi Tan and her co-creators who made Shirkers which could’ve been a Singapore-made 1992 cult classic had the 16mm footage not been stolen by their enigmatic American collaborator who disappeared.

Shirkers is Sandi Tan’s first feature-length documentary. As well as writing and directing it, she also edited and produced it.


And that’s it for this month! Thirteen films that are made by women – ooh, thirteen unlucky for some, well it is October! Do let us know what you think of any of these films, or any of the films made by women at the London Film Festival, if you catch them this month.

Reel Women: September UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

Welcome to September’s edition of Reel Women, the feature that highlights the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. This month there’s a whole host of different films made by women to choose from, both at the cinema and new Netflix original movies. There are documentaries, dramas, thrillers and thanks to its success across the pond, Crazy Rich Asians is now being released in the UK almost a month earlier than expected!

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7 September

Puzzle
Directed by Marc Turtletaub
Written by Polly Mann and Oren Moverman

Agnes (Kelly MacDonald) is a taken for granted suburban mother and wife, but when she meets Robert (Irrfan KKhan) and discovers a passion for puzzles, she finally does something for herself.

This is Polly Mann’s first produced screenplay.

 

The Hows of Us
Directed by Cathy Garcia-Molina
Written by Carmi Raymundo, Gilliann Ebreo and Cathy Garcia-Molina

A young couple who dream of growing old together struggle with the realities of being in a long-term relationship.

Cathy Garcia-Molina is a director, writer and actress with over thirty directing credits to her name. The Hows of Us is Gilliann Ebreo’s fifth writing credit and Carmi Raymundo is a writer and producer who also produced The Hows of Us.

 

The Miseducation of Cameron Post
Directed by Desiree Akhavan
Written by Desiree Akhavan and Cecilia Frugiuele

When Cameron (Chloë Grace Moretz) is discovered making out with a female classmate, she’s sent to a gay conversion therapy center called God’s Promise by her conservative aunt.

This is Akhavan’s second feature film and The Miseducation of Cameron Post won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Dramatic Film at Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. Frugiule is a writer and producer and she and Akhavan have worked together before on Akhavan’s directorial feature debut Appropriate Behaviour.

You can read our review right here

 

Sierra Burgess Is a Loser
Directed by Ian Samuels
Written by Lindsey Beer

A text sent to the wrong number sparks a virtual romance between Sierra (Shannon Purser), who’s smart but unpopular, and jock Jamey (Noah Centineo) who thinks he’s talking to cheerleader Veronica (Kristine Froseth).

Sierra Burgess Is a Loser is Lindsey Beer’s first produced screenplay. Her other writing credits include upcoming films Chaos Walking and Masters of the Universe.

 

City of Joy
Directed by Madeleine Gavin
Written by Madeleine Gavin

A Netflix documentary about the unlikely friendship that develops between Congolese doctor Dr. Denis Mukwege, Eve Ensler, and human rights activist Christine Schuler-Deschryver who join forces to create a safe haven for women survivors in the middle of violence-torn Eastern Congo.

Madeleine Gavin is a writer, director and editor. She’s edited over 30 films included Nerve and What Maisie Knew.

 

12 September

On My Skin
Directed by Alessio Cremonini
Written by Alessio Cremonini and Lisa Nur Sultan

This Netflix film is about the true story of Stefano Cucchi (Alessandro Borghi) who was arrested for a minor crime and was then mysteriously found dead during his detention.

On My Skin is Lisa Nur Sultan’s first produced screenplay.

 

14 September

Crazy Rich Asians
Directed by Jon M. Chu
Written by Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim

Rachel (Constance Wu) and Nick (Henry Golding) have been dating for over a year, and when it’s Nick’s best friend’s wedding in Singapore, it’s the perfect chance for Rachel to meet Nick’s family and friends – what she doesn’t expect is for them all to be super rich and famous!

Adele Lim is a producer and writer whose previous work has been in TV including One Tree Hill, Life Unexpected and Lethal Weapon. Crazy Rich Asians is her first film writing credit.

You can read our review right here!

 

Down to Earth
Directed by Renata Heinen and Rolf Winters
Written by Rolf Winters

Documentary about husband and wife, Rolf Winters and Renata Heinen, who take their family on a five-year journey across the world to find a new perspective on life.

Down to Earth is Renata Heinen’s directorial debut.

 

Husband Material
Directed by Anurag Kashyap
Written by Kanika Dhillon

When Rumi (Tapsee Pannu) gets tired of waiting for Vicky (Vicky Kaushal) to grow up and ask her to marry him, she asks her parents to find her a husband.

Kanika Dhillon is an actress, screenwriter and author. She has released three books and Husband Material is her sixth screenplay.

 

Reinventing Marvin
Directed by Anne Fontaine
Written by Pierre Trividic and Anne Fontaine

A young man runs away from home to become an actor.

Anne Fontaine is an actress, writer and director who was nominated for a BAFTA in Best Film Not in the English Language for Coco Before Chanel.

 

The Rider
Directed by Chloé Zhao
Written by Chloé Zhao

After suffering from a near fatal head injury from the rodeo, young cowboy Brady (Brady Jandreau) tries to find a new identity for himself when he is not able to do what he’s always known and loved.

The Rider is Chloé Zhao’s second feature film. As well as writing and directing it she also produced it. For The Rider, Zhao was nominated for Best Director at last year’s Film Independent Spirit Awards and she won the C.I.C.A.E Award at Cannes last year too.

 

The Land of Steady Habits
Directed by Nicole Holofcener
Written by Nicole Holofcener

After leaving his wife and career to “find happiness” Anders (Ben Mendelsohn) clumsily tries to put back together his fractured life.

The Land of Steady Habits is Nicole Holofcener’s seventh feature film – her film Friends with Money is currently on Netflix – and she’s also directed episodes of TV shows including Parks and Recreation and Orange is the New Black.

 

Wajib
Directed by Annemarie Jacir
Written by Annemarie Jacir

A father and his estranged son must hand delivery the invitations to his daughter’s wedding as per local Palestinian custom.

Annemarie Jacir is a writer, director, producer and editor. Wajib is her third feature film.

 

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19 September

Mile 22
Directed by Peter Berg
Written by Lea Carpenter

Elite American intelligence officer James Silva (Mark Wahlberg) is tasked with smuggling a mysterious police officer out of the country.

Mile 22 is Lea Carpenter’s first produced screenplay. She is also an author whose developing her debut novel Eleven Days for television.

 

21 September

A Simple Favour
Directed by Paul Feig
Written by Jessica Sharzer

When beautiful yet mysterious Emily (Blake Lively) disappears, her friend Stephanie (Anna Kendrick) sets out to uncover the truth of what happened.

Jessica Sharzer is a director, writer, editor and producer who has been nominated three times for a Primetime Emmy for American Horror Story. Her last feature film, which she wrote and directed, was Speak (2004) starring Kristen Stewart.

 

Faces Places
Directed by JR and Agnès Varda
Written by JR and Agnès Varda

Documentary about director Agnes Varda and photographer/muralist J.R. who journey through rural France together and form an unlikely friendship.

Agnès Varda is a legendary director who has the title of “grandmother of the French New Wave”. She has over 50 directing credits to her name and has won dozens of awards. Faces Places was nominated for Best Documentary Feature at this years Oscars.

 

Never Here
Directed by Camille Thoman
Written by Camille Thoman

Disturbing events lean to an artist who photographs and interviews strangers to suspect that someone is watching her.

Camille Thoman is a writer, director, producer, editor and actress. Never Here is her first feature film.

 

The Little Stranger
Directed by Lenny Abrahamson
Written by Lucinda Coxon

After a doctor is called to an old mansion, strange things begin to occur.

The Little Stranger is Lucinda Coxon’s fifth feature screenplay. She has previously written Wild Target and BAFTA nominated The Danish Girl.

 

Nappily Ever After
Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour
Written by Adam Brooks and Cee Marcellus

Tired of having to be perfect for everyone including herself, Violet (Sanaa Lathan) takes dramatic action and shaves off her hair. This kickstarts a whole new chapter in her life.

Nappily Ever After is Haifaa Al-Mansour’s third feature film, her feature film debut Wadjda was nominated for a BAFTA. Nappily Ever After is Cee Marcellus’s first produced screenplay.

 

Quincy
Directed by Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones
Written by Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones

A Netflix documentary taking an intimate look into the life of icon Quincy Jones.

Rashida Jones is an actress best known for playing Ann Perkins in comedy series Parks and Recreation. Quincy is her feature-length writing and directing debut.

 

28 September

Anchor and Hope
Directed by Carlos Marques-Marcet
Written by Carlos Marques-Marcet and Jules Nurrish

A lesbian couple’s plan to ask a friend to be a sperm donor brings surprising changes for all three of them.

Anchor and Hope is Jules Nurrish’s first feature film.

 

Skate Kitchen
Directed by Crystal Moselle
Written by Crystal Moselle, Jen Silverman, and Aslihan Unaldi

Teenager Camille (Rachelle Vinberg) befriends a bunch of older skateboarding girls in New York City.

As well as directing and co-writing Skate Kitchen, Crystal Moselle also produced the film. Aslihan Unaldi is a director, writer, editor and producer. This is Jen Silverman’s first feature film.

 

The Gospel According to André
Directed by Kate Novack

Documentary on operatic fashion editor André Leon Talley’s life and career.

Kate Novack is a writer, director and producer. The Gospel According to André is her second documentary film and it was nominated for Best Documentary Feature Film at Edinburgh International Film Festival earlier this year.

 

The Wife
Directed by Björn Runge
Written by Jane Anderson

Joan (Glenn Close) begins to question her life choices when she is in Stockholm with her husband who is slated to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Jane Anderson is a writer and director; her previous film The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio starring Julianne Moore and Woody Harrelson is currently on Netflix.


I do believe that this month sees the most films written and/or directed by women released in the UK since Reel Women began. Twenty-four films in total are realised in the UK in September that are made by women, six of those films are going to be released onto Netflix. Do let us know what you think of any of these films if you get the chance to see them.

 

Reel Women: August UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

Welcome back to Reel Women, a monthly feature where we highlight the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. What’s the perfect way to spend this ridiculously hot British summer we’re having? Spending time in an airconditioned cinema watching some films made by women of course! This August there’s something for everyone with documentaries, rom-coms and a couple of YA adaptations, proving that that genre is still here.

3 August

Damascus Cover
Directed by: Daniel Zelik Berk
Written by: Daniel Zelik Berk and Samantha Newton

A spy (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) struggles on an undercover mission in Syria when he falls in love.This is Samantha Newton’s first feature length writing credit. Trances, the short film she wrote, was shown at Berlinale in 2008.

Like Father
Directed by: Lauren Miller Rogen
Written by: Lauren Miller Rogen

When workaholic Rachel (Kristen Bell) is left at the altar, she accidentally goes on her honeymoon with her overachieving father (Kelsey Grammer) who suddenly came back into her life.

Lauren Miller Rogen is an actress who has appeared in films like Superbad and 50/50. This is her feature length directing and writing debut.

10 August

Dog Days
Directed by: Ken Marino
Written by: Elissa Matsueda and Erica Oyama

A group of interconnected people are brought together by their lovable dogs.

Dog Days is Elissa Matsueda’s fourth feature film. Erica Oyama is an actress, producer and writer who’s previously written episodes of The Eric Andre Show, Fresh Off the Boat and Burning Love, which she received an Emmy nomination for in 2013.

The Darkest Minds
Directed by: Jennifer Yuh Nelson
Written by: Chad Hodge

Based on the book of the same name by Alexandra Bracken, The Darkest Minds is about a group of teens with powers who fight back against the adults who fear them and want to control them.

This Jennifer Yuh Nelson’s first live-action film after previously directed Kung Fu Panda 2 and Kung Fu Panda 3.

17 August

To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before
Directed by: Susan Johnson
Written by: Sofia Alvarez

When Lara Jean (Lan Condor) gets a crush, the way she deals with it is to write the boy a love letter, but she never sends them. Then one day all her letters get sent out and they wreak havoc on her love life.

Susan Johnson’s is a producer and director, her previous film Carrie Pilby is currently on Netflix and is well worth a watch. To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before is Sofia Alvarez’s first film credit and has previously written episodes and worked as an executive story editor on the TV show Man Seeking Woman.

Distant Constellation
Directed by: Shevaun Mizrahi

A documentary about the inhabitants of a Turkish retirement home, telling anecdotes about their lives.

Distant Constellation is Shevaun Mizrahi first feature-length documentary, which she also edited, after previously working as a part of the camera and electrical department on multiple short films.

The Guardians
Directed by: Xavier Beauvois
Written by: Xavier Beauvois, Marie-Julie Maille and Frédérique Moreau

When war breaks out in France in 1915, the women are left behind to work on a family farm so that their loved ones will have something to come back to.

As well as writing The Guardians Marie-Julie Maille also edited it. She’s edited over a dozen short and feature-length films.

22 August

Load Wedding
Directed by: Nabeel Qureshi
Written By: Fizza Ali Meerza and Nabeel Qureshi

Load Wedding is a romantic social comedy starring Fahad Mustafa and Mehwish Hayat.

Fizza Ali Meerza also produced Load Wedding and it is her third produced screenplay.

The Spy Who Dumped Me
Directed by: Susanna Fogel
Written by: Susanna Fogel and David Iserson

Audrey (Mila Kunis) and her best friend Morgan (Kate McKinnon) get caught up in an international conspiracy when they discover that Audrey’s ex-boyfriend (Justin Theroux) is actually a spy.

Susanna Fogel is a writer, director and producer. The Spy Who Dumped Me is her second film.

24 August

One Note At A Time
Directed by: Renne Edwards

Documentary about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and how musicians use music to try and piece themselves together.

One Note at a Time is Renee Edwards’ first feature-length documentary. She’s edited over twenty different films and TV shows including episodes of Dispatches and Panorama.


That’s 10 very different films released in the UK this month, both in cinemas and on Netflix, that are made by women. If you get the chance to see any of them, we’d love to hear what you think of them.

Reel Women: July UK Releases

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WRITTEN BY ELENA MORGAN

Welcome back to Reel Women, a monthly feature where we highlight the films being released in the UK that are written and/or directed by women. We are now official in the second half of the year (what?! how?!) and there’s still a lot of films made by women to see over the next six months. In July there’s dramas, comedies and more documentaries than you can shake a stick at in the latter half of the month!


6th July

Mary Shelley
Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour
Written by Emma Jensen and Haifaa Al-Mansour

The story of the love affair between Percy Shelley (Douglas Booth) and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (Elle Fanning) and how Mary came to write Frankenstein.

With Wadjda, Haifaa Al-Mansour was the first woman from Saudi Arabia to direct a feature film in Saudi Arabia. Wadjda was nominated for a BAFTA and was widely praised. This is Emma Jensen’s first produced feature screenplay.

The More You Ignore Me
Directed by Keith English
Written by Jo Brand

Teenage Alice (Ella Hunt) lives with her hippy-like dad (Mark Addy) and her mum (Sheridan Smith) who suffers from mental health issues. When her mum is admitted to a local psychiatric hospital, Alice is left with her love f The Smiths as she tries to navigate teenage life without her mum.

Jo Brand is a British comedian, writer and actress. She’s previously written episodes of the TV shows ‘Damned’ and ‘Getting On’ amongst others. This is Brand’s first feature film screenplay, and she adapted it from her own novel of the same name.

In Darkness
Directed by Anthony Byrne
Written by Anthony Byrne and Natalie Dormer

When a bind musician (Natalie Dormer) hears a murder committed in the apartment above her own, she takes a dark path into London’s criminal underworld to find out the truth.

Natalie Dormer is an actress best known for her roles in ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘The Hunger Games’ films. ‘In Darkness’ is her first screenplay and the first film she’s produced.

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13th July

Pin Cushion
Directed by Deborah Haywood
Written by Deborah Haywood

Super close mother and daughter, Lyn (Joanna Scanlan) and Iona (Lily Newmark) are looking forward to a life in a new town but things aren’t as easy as they thought and they both retreat into fantasies of their own making.

Deborah Haywood has previously written and directed five short films. Pin Cushion is a feature film debut and it was nominated for the Douglas Hickox Award at the British Independent Film Awards last year.

Summer 1993
Directed by Carla Simón
Written by Carla Simón

After her mother dies, six-year-old Frida (Laia Artigas) is sent to the countryside to live with her uncle’s family but she finds it difficult to settle into her new life.

Carla Simón has previously written and directed a couple of short films. Summer 1993 is her first feature film.

The Butterfly Tree
Directed by Priscilla Cameron
Written by Priscilla Cameron

Ex-burlesque queen Evelyn (Melissa George) enchants both single dad Al and his teenage son Fin (Ed Oxenbould) with her thirst for life. But tensions rise between the father and son when they realise they are both competing for the affections of the same woman.

Priscilla Cameron has written and directed three short films and The Butterfly Tree was nominated for Best Original Screenplay in at the 2017 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards.

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20th July

Generation Wealth
Directed by Lauren Greenfield
Written by Lauren Greenfield

A documentary investigating the pathologies that has created the riches society the world has ever seen.

Lauren Greenfield is a director, writer and producer who was nominated for a Primetime Emmy for her documentary Thin.

Madame
Directed by Amanda Sthers
Written by Amanda Sthers

When she realises their dinner party is for thirteen guests, Anne (Toni Collette) panics because it’s bad luck and enlists her maid Maria (Rossy de Palma) to pretend to be one of her rich guests. But sparks fly between Maria and art broker David (Michael Smiley) and this unexpected romance leads to Anne chasing the pair around Paris as she plots to ruin their happiness.

Madame is the second film Amanda Sthers has directed after previously writing films for TV.

One or Two Questions
Directed by Kristina Konrad
Written by Kristina Konrad

A documentary about Uruguay’s 1989 amnesty referendum, a vote to determine whether members of the police and military accused of crimes during the country’s 12 years of junta rule could be prosecuted after they were granted impunity three years before.

Kristina Konrad is a documentary filmmaker who has directed four feature-length documentaries and produced over a dozen films.

Extinction
Directed by Salomé Lamas
Written by Salomé Lamas

An essay film on the fluidity of national identity in times of conflict.

Salomé Lamas is a Portuguese writer and director of short films and feature-length documentaries.

The Receptionist
Directed by Jenny Lu
Written by Jenny Lu and Yi-Wen Yeh

Based on a real illegal massage parlour in London, The Receptionist follows the lives of the employees and clients as seen through the graduate who’s employed as the receptionist.

This is Jenny Lu’s first feature film and is Yi-Wen Yeh’s first screenplay. Lu and Yeh have previously worked together on the short film The Man Who Walked on the Moon.

27th July

The Bleeding Edge
Directed by Kirby Dick
Written by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering

A Netflix documentary on the unforeseen consequences of rushing through advanced technological devices to be used in the medical field.

Amy Ziering has worked with Kirby Dick on four documentary films, and their film The Invisible War as nominated for an Oscar in 2013.

That’s twelve films made by women being released in the UK in July including one on Netflix. We would love to hear your thoughts on any of these films if you get the chance to see them, though you’ll have to be quick as a lot of these films have a very limited release.

Reel Women: June UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

Welcome back to Reel Women, a monthly feature where we highlight the films that are being released in the UK this month that are written and/or directed by women. As ever this is a mixture of wide and smaller releases, so depending where in the country you are, some might be easier to see than others, and there’s a couple of Netflix Original films here too. All the release date information comes from Launching Films and all dates are correct at the time this post was written – we all know film releases can change at the last minute, especially for smaller films.

This month there’s romantic comedies, documentaries, dramas, and one I’m personally very excited for – the Ocean’s spin-off.

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1 June

Book Club
Directed by Bill Holderman
Written by Bill Holderman and Erin Simms

When four long-time friends (Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen) decide to read 50 Shades of Grey for the book club, they all get a whole new lease for life.

Erin Simms is an actress and producer who worked as a part of the crew for such films as ‘A Walk in the Woods’ and ‘Pete’s Dragon’. ‘Book Club’ is her first produced screenplay.

Ismael’s Ghosts

Directed by Arnaud Desplechin
Written by Arnaud Desplechin, Julie Peyr and Léa Mysius

Ismael (Mathieu Amalric) is a filmmaker whose life is turned on its head when his wife (Marion Cotillard), who he hasn’t seen for over twenty years comes back into his life, disrupting his relationship.

This is Julie Peyr’s second collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin and her tenth screenwriting credit. Léa Mysius is a writer and director of a number of short films. Her debut feature film, ‘Ava’, screened at the London Film Festival last year.

Lost in Vagueness
Directed by Sofia Olins

A music documentary about Roy Gurvitz who created Lost Vagueness at Glastonbury and reinvigorated the festival.

‘Lost in Vagueness’ is Sofia Olins’ first feature-length documentary. She’s previously worked as a second unit director or assistant director on a variety of British television series including ‘Primeval’, ‘The IT Crowd’ and ‘Peep Show’.

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8 June

The Boy Downstairs
Written and Directed by Sophie Brooks

Diana (Zosia Mamet) is forced to reflect on her past relationship with Ben (Matthew Shear) when she unintentionally moves into the apartment above his.

‘The Boy Downstairs’ is Sophie Brooks first feature film.

15 June

Set It Up
Directed by Claire Scanlon
Written by Katie Silberman

Harper (Zoey Deutch) and Charlie (Glen Powell) are two stressed out assistants who each have a high maintenance boss, Kristen (Lucy Liu) and Rick (Taye Diggs). When they decide to play matchmaker, maybe they can spread some romance and get their freedom.

Think of any big American comedy show of the past ten years and Claire Scanlon has probably directed at least one episode of it. Her directing credits include ‘The Office’, ‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’, ‘Modern Family’ and ‘Fresh Off the Boat’. ‘Set It Up’ is her first feature film. Katie Silberman has previously produced comedy films ‘Hot Pursuit’ and ‘How to Be Single’. ‘Set It Up’ is her first feature-length screenplay to make it to the screen.

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22 June

Ocean’s 8
Directed by Gary Ross
Written by Gary Ross and Olivia Milch

Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) gathers a crew to attempt to rob the Met Gala.

Olivia Milch is a writer-director whose debut film, ‘Dude’, is a Netflix Original Film. As well as co-writing Ocean’s 8 she is also a co-producer on the film.

Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat
Directed by Sara Driver

A documentary exploring the pre-fame years of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, and how New York City its people and the shifting arts culture of the 1970s and ‘80s shaped his work.

‘Boom for Real’ is Sara Driver’s first documentary feature film and her first film in 15 years.

Freak Show
Directed by Trudie Styler
Written by Patrick J. Clifton and Beth Rigazio

Despite attending an ultra-conservative high school, teenager Billy Bloom (Alex Lawther) decides to run for Homecoming Queen.

Trudie Styler is an actress and producer and ‘Freak Show’ is her directorial feature debut. Beth Rigazio has previously written TV movies including the Disney Channel original movie, ‘Go Figure’.

24 June

To Each, Her Own (aka Les Gouts et Les Couleurs)
Directed by Myriam Aziza
Written by Myriam Aziza, Denyse Rodriguez-Tomé

Simone’s (Sarah Stern) been in a relationship with Claire (Julia Piaton) for years but has never come out to her family. Her brothers keep trying to set her up with men, her father’s a traditionalist and her mother is just a little bit eccentric – soon everything comes to ahead and Simone is forced to make some hard choices.

‘To Each, Her Own’ is a Netflix Original and is Myriam Aziza’s sixth film. She wrote, directed, edited and was cinematographer on her documentary film ‘L’an prochain à Jérusalem’. Denyse Rodriguez-Tomé previous screenwriting credits include ‘I Hate Love‘ which won the Award of the Youth in the French Film category at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival.

27 June

Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms
Written and Directed by Mari Okada

Maquia (Manaka Iwami) is an immortal girl and when she ventures out into the world she meets Erial (Miyu Irino) a mortal boy, their friendship becomes an unbreakable bond that lasts throughout the years.

‘Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms’ is Mari Okada’s directorial debut but she’s written episodes for dozens of different anime. In 2011 Okada won the Animation Kobe Award, an award and event that aims to promote anime and other visual media.

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29 June

Leave No Trace
Directed by Debra Granik
Written by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini

A father (Ben Foster) and his teenage daughter (Thomasin McKenzie) have an idyllic life living in a vast urban park in Oregon, until they are forced to re-join society.

Debra Granik is the director of ‘Winter’s Bone’, a film she co-wrote with Anne Rosellini and which earned them both an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. ‘Leave No Trace’ is their first feature film since ‘Winter’s Bone’ was released in 2010.

Patrick
Directed by Mandie Fletcher
Written by Vanessa Davies, Mandie Fletcher and Paul de Vos

Sarah’s (Beattie Edmondson) life is a bit of a mess and she really could do without the pug named Patrick her grandmother bequeathed her. As Sarah struggles to look after Patrick, find romance with his vet (Ed Skrein) and cope with a new job, Sarah realises that Patrick might just be helping her turn her life around.

Mandie Fletcher has directed episodes of popular British comedies like ‘Black Adder the Third’, ‘Only Fools and Horses’, and ‘Miranda’ and her previous film was ‘Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie’. ‘Patrick’ is both Mandie Fletcher’s and Vanessa Davies’s first produced screenplay.

The Bookshop
Written and Directed by Isabel Coixet

Set in a small English town in 1959, Florence (Emily Mortimer) decides to open a bookshop but is met with polite yet ruthless opposition.

Isabel Coixet is a Spanish filmmaker with over 30 directing credits and 20 writing credits to her name.

 


 

That’s thirteen films made by women being released in the UK in June. There’s something for everyone with animation, dramas, documentaries and a fair few romantic comedies. Personally, I’m looking forward to ‘Ocean’s 8′ and ‘Set It Up’, two films that have been on my radar for a while, but one I hadn’t heard of before researching this feature but definitely want to see is ‘Freak Show’ – the trailer makes it look like so much fun!

Reel Women: May UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

At the start of each month we will be highlighting the films that will be released in UK cinemas that month, that are written and/or directed by women- a little feature we like to call ‘Reel Women’. As someone who’s taken part in the #52FilmsbyWomen for the past few years, I’ve started paying at least a little attention to who is writing and directing what I watch. It’s an enlightening experience and it’s a good way to watch films that I might not have normally have thought about and discover different filmmakers.

Now it’s time to look at May’s releases that are made by women. This month there are a whole host of genres including comedy, thriller, and documentary.

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4 May

I Feel Pretty
Directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein | Written by: Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein

Renee (Amy Schumer) struggles with insecurities about her body and her abilities, that is until she bangs her head and wakes up believing she’s the most beautiful and capable woman on the planet.

This is both Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein’s feature-length directorial debut but together they’ve written some rom-com classics like ‘Never Been Kissed’ and the romantic drama ‘The Vow’.

Mary and the Witch’s Flower
Directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi Written by Riko Sakaguchi and Hiromasa Yonebayashi

The first film from new Japanese animation company, Studio Ponoc, ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ is about a young girl who discovers a world of magic and danger after she picks a flower that only blooms once every seven years.

Riko Sakaguchi has written multiple television series and the Oscar nominated Studio Ghibli film, ‘The Tale of the Princess Kaguya’.

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11 May

How to Talk to Girls at Parties
Directed by John Cameron Mitchell | Written by Philippa Goslett and John Cameron Mitchell

It’s 1977 in London and when Enn (Alex Sharp) and his friends stubble across a weird party they meet alien Zan (Elle Fanning) who becomes fascinated with them, Earth and everything punk. Philippa Goslett has written four feature films including ‘Holy Money’ and ‘Mary Magdalene’.

Life of the Party
Directed by Ben Falcone | Written by Ben Falcone and Melissa McCarthy

After her husband suddenly asks for a divorce, Deanna (Melissa McCarthy) decides to join her teenage daughter (Molly Gordon) at college so she can complete her degree. Melissa McCarthy is a hilarious comedian who’s starred in so many great films like ‘The Heat’, ‘Bridesmaids’ and ‘Spy’. ‘Life of the Party’ is the third film she’s co-written with husband Ben Falcone after ‘The Boss’ and ‘Tammy’.

Raazi
Directed by Meghna Gulzar | Written by Meghna Gulzar and Bhavani Iyer

A thriller about Sehmat (Aalia Bhatt), a Kashmiri spy who is married to Iqbal (Vicky Kaushal), a Pakistani man during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, as she attempts to balance being a wife, mother and spy.

‘Raazi’ is Meghna Gulzar’s fourth feature film. Her previous film ‘Talvar’, is on Netflix and is well worth a watch. Bhavani Iyer has multiple writing credits to her name including the TV series ‘24: India’, the Indian remake of ‘24′.

Revenge
Directed by Coralie Fargeat | Written by Coralie Fargeat

Jen (Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz) is enjoying a romantic getaway with her wealthy boyfriend, until his sleazy friends arrive for a hunting trip. When the situation abruptly turns to violence and Jen is left for dead, she prepares to take bloody revenge on them all.

Revenge is Coralie Fargeat’s debut feature film and she also was one of its editors.

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18 May

A Love That Never Dies
Directed by Jimmy Edmonds and Jane Harris

A documentary following Jimmy and Jane, who lost their son seven years previously, as they take a road trip across the USA to meet other grieving parents and to see how and why different people grieve.

This is Jane Harris’ first film.

Montparnasse Bienvenue
Directed by Léonor Serraille | Written by Clémence Carré, Bastien Daret and Léonor Serraille

Paula Simonian (Laetitia Dosch) is in her early-thirties, is broke and single. She’s spirited yet directionless as she struggles to get by in the lively Parisian metropolis; but if she can make it there, she’ll make it anywhere.

This is Léonor Serraille’s first feature film and it won her the Golden Camera award, which is the award for best first feature film, at Cannes Film Festival last year. ‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’ has won 10 awards and been nominated for 14 more. Clémence Carré has previously worked with Serraille as she edited Serraille’s short film ‘Body’.

Submergence
Directed by Wim Wenders | Written by Erin Dignam

While captured by jihadist fighters, Scotsman James Moore (James McAvoy) remembers meeting scientist Danielle Flinders (Alicia Vikander) who is preparing to dive in a submersible to the ocean floor. Both in their own confinements, they remember their brief yet intense romance as they struggle with what lies ahead.

Erin Digman’s previous writing credit was ‘The Last Face’ starring Charlize Theron and Javier Bardem. Digman’s directorial and screenplay debut was ‘Denial’ which was nominated for the Grad Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival in 1990.

Cargo
Directed by Yolanda Ramke and Ben Howling | Written by Yolanda Ramke

Stranded in rural Australia after a violent pandemic, Andy (Martin Freeman) is a desperate father trying to find somewhere safe for his infant daughter. ‘Cargo’ is Yolanda Ramke’s first feature film and it is an adaptation of the short film of the same name she and Ben Howling made in 2013.

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25 May

Edie
Directed by Simon Hunter | Written by Elizabeth O’Halloran

After the death of her controlling husband, Edith Moore (Sheila Hancock) decides to attempt a lifelong ambition and climb a mountain in Scotland.

This is Elizabeth O’Halloran’s first screenplay.

The Breadwinner
Directed by Nora Twomey | Written by Anita Doron

After her father is thrown in jail, a young girl (Saara Chaudry) disguises herself as a boy in order to provide for her family.

‘The Breadwinner’ was nominated for Best Animated Feature at this years Oscars. Nora Twomey co-directed Cartoon Saloon’s first feature film ‘The Secret of Kells’. Anita Doran is a writer and director who has directed five feature films.

The Incredible Story of the Giant Pear
Directed by Amalie Næsby Fick, Jørgen Lerdam and Philip Einstein Lipski | Written by Bo Hr. Hansen

When friends Mitcho (Liva Elvira Magnussen) and Sebastian (Alfred Bjerre Larsen) find a message in a bottle, they go on an adventure inside a giant pear to find the missing mayor of their quaint town.

‘The Incredible Story of the Giant Pear’ is Amalie Næsby Fick’s first feature film.

Zama
Directed by Lucrecia Martel | Written by Lucrecia Martel

Don Diego de Zama (Daniel Giménez Cacho), a Spanish officer of the seventeenth century waits in Paraguay for news of his transfer to Buenos Aires. When he hears a man called Vicuña Porto (Matheus Nachtergaele) is raping women and attacking villages, Zama decides to help those in need.

Lucrecia Martel has won numerous awards including Best Film and Best Director for ‘The Headless Woman’ at the Argentinean Academy Awards, and the Alfred Bauer Award at the Berlin International Film Festival for ‘La Ciénaga. Zama’ is Martel’s fifth feature film.

Ibiza
Directed by Alex Richanback | Written by Lauryn Kahn

Harper (Gillian Jacobs) and her two best friends fly to Spain to find a hot DJ.

Lauryn Kahn has written over a dozen short films and Ibiza is her first feature film. It’s also one of Netflix’s original movies.


Those are the fifteen films that are written and/or directed by women and are being released in the UK this month. Some of these are likely to have smaller releases than others, especially foreign language films like ‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’ and ‘Zama’, but there is a couple of Netflix Originals here too, so you can watch them in the comfort of your own home. By writing this post I have discovered many UK releases I was previously unaware of, and I hope some of these films might have piqued your interest too.

We’d love to hear your thoughts on any of these films you if catch them this month! Be sure to leave us a message in the comments below, or tweet us at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE