LFF 2018: The Old Man and The Gun

Year: 2018
Directed by: David Lowery
Starring: Robert Redford, Casey Affleck, Sissy Spacek, Danny Glover

Written by Sarah Buddery

A legend of cinema since the mid-1960s, Robert Redford has certainly had an illustrious career. Now some 50+ films later, Redford tips a cap to his own career and gracefully retires from acting in the delightful throwback film The Old Man and The Gun.

The phrase “they don’t make them like they used to” could certainly be applied to Redford himself, and it is that mentality that also applies to this film. It harkens back to the capers of yesteryear, and there is an old-world charm to it that makes it the perfect swansong for Redford. With Director David Lowery at the helm, it is evident that there is love, and a real passion for the craft of filmmaking behind this film, as well as an appreciation for the lead actor.

There is a grainy authenticity to the film, and were it not for the now older appearance of Robert Redford, it could quite easily have passed for a film made much earlier in his career! The Old Man and The Gun is endlessly charming, and the care for the making of the film and the story itself permeates throughout.

From the grain of the film and the jaunty soundtrack, everything about The Old Man and The Gun is meticulously put together, and it makes for an incredibly enjoyable watch. There’s something incredibly comforting about it; in fact, it is almost like the film equivalent of curling up in front of a fire with your cosiest slippers on.

There’s a beautiful sense of melancholy to the film as well, with Robert Redford’s Forrest Tucker refusing to put his heist days behind him, but yet also accepting that his age can sometimes be a hindrance. It is also in the scenes with Sissy Spacek’s Jewel, that this film truly sparkles (pun intended!) and they have a delightful and warming on-screen chemistry. It’s refreshing to see an onscreen relationship that features an older couple, who are simply just happy to be in each other’s company. There is the sense that they are truly kindred spirits despite their huge differences and there is something about this which just makes it lovely to watch.

The Old Man and The Gun succeeds in being both an enjoyable throwback caper, as well as a great vehicle for Robert Redford at this reported final stage in his career. It is comforting, delightful, charming and endlessly endearing. Mr. Redford, the world of film will miss you!

Sarah’s Verdict:

4-5

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New Trailer For David Lowery’s ‘The Old Man And The Gun’ Released

“THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN is based on the true story of Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford), from his audacious escape from San Quentin at the age of 70 to an unprecedented string of heists that confounded authorities and enchanted the public. Wrapped up in the pursuit are detective John Hunt (Casey Affleck), who becomes captivated with Forrest’s commitment to his craft, and a woman (Sissy Spacek), who loves him in spite of his chosen profession.”

Directed by: David Lowery

Cast: Robert Redford, Casey Affleck, Sissy Spacek, Danny Glover, Tom Waits, Tika Sumpter

Release Date: September 28th, 2018

A Ghost Story

Year: 2017
Directed by: David Lowery
Starring: Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck, McColm Cephas Jr.

 

“What is it you like about this house so much,” asks M (Rooney Mara), insisting through her bemused expression that C (Casey Affleck) must respond. “History,” he says. They remain in disagreement. The ghost wanders through time, reflecting on past memories shared in their small countryside home. It’s a strange scene, and one that’s shot with the emotional sensitivity of a Spike Jonze movie, but it’s one of the only times that love and time were captured to such a moving degree.

The appropriately short A Ghost Story follows the life after death motif in the sudden death of M’s boyfriend, C. And the thing about death is that some things remain unresolved, if maybe a bit more mysterious than urgent. Death has been depicted and questioned in different ways, even though nobody *really* knows what it looks like. We don’t even know what it sounds like. Which is why David Lowery doesn’t attempt to answer those broken questions, rather, he grapples with what it means to be dead, a ghost.

The film begins with the loving couple flirting on their small living room couch as they cuddle under the romantic darkness of their isolated home. M notes the abrupt noises of the house often heard at nighttime, as she glances over at the mysterious white glow by the living room door. It’s ignored, as though some houses naturally live under a ghostly atmosphere, considering the deep history of each family that has come before.

M wants to leave in search of new opportunities in the city, but C is fixed on staying because of their valuable history. Unfortunately, M would have her way in the disturbing event of her husband’s death. What follows is a tragic tale of reconciliation between love and time. C is resurrected from his deathbed as a Ghost, invisible to the naked eye (not for the audience but the people in the film), and is burdened with the grief of losing someone who’s still alive.

Normally, there is nothing more tragic than losing a loved one to death, but A Ghost Story bravely asks whether the grief of watching someone move on is more destructive than having to move on from death itself. This is best demonstrated in one of the film’s most talked about scenes in which Rooney Mara eats an entire pie within a five-minute take. In the background, a tall and frail ghost watches from a distance as though its heart is ready to leap out in the hopes of comforting the once loving wife. Some hated the scene for its long duration – seemingly lacking purpose – but the strong effect is that of climaxing grief and hopelessness.

A Ghost Story is at its best when it exercises patience, examining small bouts of naturalistic grief in the form of emotionally nuanced performances. It all builds into one great moment half-way through the movie in which the music swells as M drives away from home. The film could end as of that moment and still receive the same review. What comes next is similar to that of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ in its provocative finale.

But really, A Ghost Story, even as it travels back in time, and portrays death to that of being a ghost, is a story about grieving the loss of a loved one and having to reflect on the relationship’s history. David Lowery has achieved what could only be described as a masterpiece, and one that explores love and time like no other film.

HUNTER’S RATING:

5

Robert Redford Is A Gentleman On The Run In A Brand New Trailer For ‘The Old Man And The Gun’

“THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN is based on the true story of Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford), from his audacious escape from San Quentin at the age of 70 to an unprecedented string of heists that confounded authorities and enchanted the public. Wrapped up in the pursuit are detective John Hunt (Casey Affleck), who becomes captivated with Forrest’s commitment to his craft, and a woman (Sissy Spacek), who loves him in spite of his chosen profession.”

Directed by: David Lowery

Cast: Robert Redford, Casey Affleck, Sissy Spacek, Danny Glover, Tom Waits, Tika Sumpter

Release Date: September 28th, 2018

The Full List Of EE British Academy Film Award Winners

Stephen Fry hosted the 70th British Academy Film Awards in London’s Royal Albet Hall and it’ll come as no surprise to many, ‘La La Land’ waltzed away with 5 BAFTA wins, including ‘Best Picture’, ‘Best Direction’, and ‘Best Original Music’.

The latest actor to step into the Spider-Man suit, Tom Holland, won the ‘Rising Star’ award which was voted for by the public. Casey Affleck walked away with ‘Best Leading Actor’ and Viola Davis collected her much deserved award for ‘Best Supporting Actress’. Former ‘Skins’ star, Dev Patel, won ‘Best Supporting Actor’ for his brilliant performance in ‘Lion’and ‘I, Daniel Blake’ took home the prize for ‘Outstanding British Film’.

Below you can find the full list of winners:

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A Beginners’ Guide To Awards Season

Written by Chris Gelderd

Ladies and gentlemen, it gives me great pleasure to write my first ever article for JumpCut UK, and what better place to start, at this time of the year, than with a Beginners’ Guide to Awards Season.

Now, Hollywood runs to a pretty tight calendar. Spring usually offers up plenty of family-friendly films; Summer is all about the big-budget blockbusters; Autumn gives us the horrors and thrillers, whilst winter signals the start of awards season, when studios battle it out with their carefully selected productions, aiming to surprise and move audiences, with one eye firmly placed on adding some gold statues to their trophy cabinets. There are awards-skeptics who now regard all of this as simply over-the-top, politically and racially motived, Hollywood excess, whilst others can’t wait to delve into the treasures that studios have been saving for this time of year. Lastly, there are those who are new to the whole awards season buzz. If you fit into this category, then hopefully you’ll find this simple guide to be a helpful introduction to the glitz and glamour of awards season.

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La La Land Sweeps Everyone Off Their Feet At Golden Globe Awards

Last night, Jimmy Fallon hosted the 74th Golden Globe Awards at the Beverley Hilton in California and unsurprisingly, La La Land waltzed away with all 7 awards it was nominated for. Other winners included Aaron Taylor-Johnson for his skin-crawlingly creepy supporting role in Nocturnal Animals,  Casey Affleck won the award for best performance by an actor in a drama for his role in Manchester by the Sea, and Zootopia took home the award for best animated feature film.

Below is the full list of film award winners. 

Best motion picture – Drama

  • Winner: Moonlight
  • Hacksaw Ridge
  • Hell or High Water
  • Lion
  • Manchester by the Sea

Best motion picture – Comedy or Musical

  • Winner: La La Land
  • 20th Century Women
  • Deadpool
  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Sing Street

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture – Drama

  • Winner: Casey Affleck – Manchester by the Sea
  • Joel Edgerton – Loving
  • Andrew Garfield – Hacksaw Ridge
  • Viggo Mortensen – Captain Fantastic
  • Denzel Washington – Fences

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture – Drama

  • Winner: Isabelle Huppert – Elle
  • Amy Adams – Arrival
  • Jessica Chastain – Miss Sloane
  • Ruth Negga – Loving
  • Natalie Portman – Jackie

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture – Comedy or Musical

  • Winner: Ryan Gosling – La La Land
  • Colin Farrell – The Lobster
  • Hugh Grant – Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Jonah Hill – War Dogs
  • Ryan Reynolds – Deadpool

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture – Comedy or Musical

  • Winner: Emma Stone – La La Land
  • Annette Bening – 20th Century Women
  • Lily Collins – Rules Don’t Apply
  • Hailee Steinfeld – The Edge of Seventeen
  • Meryl Streep – Florence Foster Jenkins

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a motion picture

  • Winner: Aaron Taylor-Johnson – Nocturnal Animals
  • Mahershala Ali – Moonlight
  • Jeff Bridges – Hell or High Water
  • Simon Helberg – Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Dev Patel – Lion

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a motion picture

  • Winner: Viola Davis – Fences
  • Naomie Harris – Moonlight
  • Nicole Kidman – Lion
  • Octavia Spencer – Hidden Figures
  • Michelle Williams – Manchester by the Sea

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Winner: Damien Chazelle – La La Land
  • Tom Ford – Nocturnal Animals
  • Mel Gibson – Hacksaw Ridge
  • Barry Jenkins – Moonlight
  • Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester by the Sea

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • Winner: Damien Chazelle – La La Land
  • Tom Ford – Nocturnal Animals
  • Barry Jenkins – Moonlight
  • Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester by the Sea
  • Taylor Sheridan – Hell or High Water

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Winner: Zootopia
  • Kubo and the Two Strings
  • Moana
  • My Life as a Zucchini
  • Sing

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Winner: Elle
  • Divines
  • Neruda
  • The Salesman
  • Toni Erdmann

Best Priginal Score – Motion Picture

  • Winner: Justin Hurwitz – La La Land
  • Hans Zimmer, Pharrell Williams, Benjamin Wallfisch – Hidden Figures
  • Dustin O’Halloran, Hauschka – Lion
  • Johann Johannsson – Arrival
  • Nicholas Britell – Moonlight

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Winner: City of Stars – La La Land
  • Can’t Stop the Feeling – Trolls
  • Faith – Sing
  • Gold – Gold
  • How Far I’ll Go – Moana
Written by Tom Sheffield