22nd Online Film Critics Society (OFCS) Award Nominations Announced

The Favourite, Roma, and If Beale Street Could Talk top the nominations list for the 2018 Online Film Critics Society Awards (OFCS). The winners will be revealed 2nd January 2019. 


BEST PICTURE
Annihilation
BlacKkKlansman
Eighth Grade
The Favourite
First Reformed
Hereditary
If Beale Street Could Talk
Roma
A Star Is Born
Suspiria
You Were Never Really Here

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Incredibles 2
Isle of Dogs
Mirai
Ralph Breaks the Internet
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

BEST DIRECTOR
Alfonso Cuarón – Roma
Barry Jenkins – If Beale Street Could Talk
Yorgos Lanthimos – The Favourite
Spike Lee – BlacKkKlansman
Lynne Ramsay – You Were Never Really Here

BEST LEAD ACTOR

Christian Bale – Vice
Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born
Ethan Hawke – First Reformed
Joaquin Phoenix – You Were Never Really Here
John David Washington – BlacKkKlansman

BEST LEAD ACTRESS
Yalitza Aparicio – Roma
Toni Collette – Hereditary
Olivia Colman – The Favourite
Regina Hall – Support the Girls
Lady Gaga – A Star Is Born

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Mahershala Ali – Green Book
Adam Driver – BlacKkKlansman
Richard E. Grant – Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Michael B. Jordan – Black Panther
Steven Yeun – Burning

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Elizabeth Debicki – Widows
Regina King – If Beale Street Could Talk
Thomasin McKenzie – Leave No Trace
Emma Stone – The Favourite
Rachel Weisz – The Favourite

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Eighth Grade
The Favourite
First Reformed
Roma
Sorry to Bother You

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
BlacKkKlansman
Can You Ever Forgive Me?
If Beale Street Could Talk
Leave No Trace
Widows

BEST EDITING
The Favourite
First Man
Mission: Impossible – Fallout
Roma
Widows

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Cold War
The Favourite
First Man
If Beale Street Could Talk
Roma

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Black Panther
First Man
If Beale Street Could Talk
Isle of Dogs
Suspiria

BEST DEBUT FEATURE

Ari Aster – Hereditary
Bo Burnham – Eighth Grade
Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born
Carlos López Estrada – Blindspotting
Boots Riley – Sorry to Bother You

BEST FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Burning
Cold War
Roma
Shoplifters
Zama

BEST DOCUMENTARY

Free Solo
Minding the Gap
Shirkers
Three Identical Strangers
Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

 

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The Indies Came Out to Play

Written by Fernando Andrade

In a year with so many great independent films, it was rewarding to see so many different movies get love with this year’s Film Independent Spirit Award nominations. While it seems like bigger studio films will get the push for the Golden Globes and Oscar’s, a lot of these films will be relegated to just these independent awards, but maybe, these nominations will lead to some much-needed momentum come later in the awards season.

Just like last year, A24 dominated with a total of 12 nominations. Bo Burnham’s ‘Eighth Grade’ received nominations for best female lead in Elsie Fisher, best supporting male actor in Josh Hamilton, best first screenplay, and best feature. Surprisingly enough it did not get nominated for best first feature, but maybe that came down to the members wanting to spread the love since Ari Aster’s ‘Hereditary’ gave A24 a nominee in that category, as well as best female lead with Toni Collette. Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ also helped A24 with nominations in best feature, best director, best male lead, and best screenplay. While Jonah Hill’s directorial debut ‘Mid90’s’ only managed to get a best editing nomination.

Amazon, Netflix, and The Orchard, while nowhere near A24, performed well, with 6 nominations each. The Orchard does get bragging rights over A24 as ‘We the Animals’ picked up the single most nominations for a film with 5. Amazon was lead by Lynne Ramsay’s ‘You were never Really Here’ with 4 nominations, and Suspiria picked up a nomination for best cinematography and was awarded the prestigious Robert Altman Award. Netflix surprised many with its Indie hit ‘Private Life’ getting 3 nominations including best director, best supporting female actor, and best screenplay. They also received two best international film nominations with ‘Roma’ and‘Happy as Lazzaro’ both which were not eligible for other award consideration.

Annapurna also managed to snag an impressive 5 nominees thanks to Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ and Boots Riley’s ‘Sorry to Bother You’. Jenkins, who’s last film ‘Moonlight’ won best feature in 2016, once again sees his film receive a nomination for best feature along with himself for best director.

Other notable stand outs we want to highlight are Helena Howard and Ashley Connor who received nominations for best female lead and best cinematography respectively for there work on ‘Madelines Madeline’. Benjamin Loeb was nominated for cinematography for his work on Mandy. Daveed Diggs was nominated for his performance in ‘Blindspotting’ as well as John Cho for his performance in ‘Searching’. In a year with exceptional documentaries, two which are loved here at Jumpcut which got nominations are ‘Minding the Gap’ and ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’. Jim Cummings film ‘Thunder Road’ also was nominated for the John Cassavetes Award for films budgeted at less than $500,000.

Some of the bigger studios this year seemed to be overshadowed, as Focus Features, Sony Picture Classics, and Fox Searchlight all had trouble breaking into the fold. Focus only managed 3 nominees with ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’, Adam Driver for his supporting role in ‘BlackKklansman’, and best screenplay for ‘Thoroughbreds’. Fox Searchlight only saw 2 nominations for ‘Can You Ever Forgive Me?’ and one wasn’t even Melissa McCarthy, but instead Richard E. Grant and a best screenplay nomination. There third came in the form of Yorgos Lanthimos’ ‘The Favourite’ for best international film. Sony Picture Classics, which last year performed exceptionally well thanks to ‘Call Me By Your Name’ only managed a single nominations this year with Glenn Close for best female lead in ‘The Wife’.

Also, worth noting is the amount of inclusion from this year’s nominees. Whether its three female directors being nominated for best director, to three of the five best male leads being people of color, and a lot more spread throughout the nominations in every category, it is always great seeing diversity.

This year’s Film Independent Spirit Awards will take place on Saturday, February 23rd, 2019.

FULL LIST OF NOMINEES:

Best Feature

EIGHTH GRADE

FIRST REFORMED

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

LEAVE NO TRACE

YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Best Director

Debra Granik, LEAVE NO TRACE

Barry Jenkins, IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

Tamara Jenkins, PRIVATE LIFE

Lynne Ramsay, YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Paul Schrader, FIRST REFORMED

Best First Feature

HEREDITARY

SORRY TO BOTHER YOU

THE TALE

WE THE ANIMALS

WILDLIFE

Best Male Lead

John Cho, SEARCHING

Daveed Diggs, BLINDSPOTTING

Ethan Hawke, FIRST REFORMED

Christian Malheiros, SÓCRATES

Joaquin Phoenix, YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Best Female Lead

Glenn Close, THE WIFE

Toni Collette, HEREDITARY

Elsie Fisher, EIGHTH GRADE

Regina Hall, SUPPORT THE GIRLS

Helena Howard, MADELINE’S MADELINE

Carey Mulligan, WILDLIFE

Best Supporting Female Actor

Kayli Carter, PRIVATE LIFE

Tyne Daly, A BREAD FACTORY

Regina King, IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie, LEAVE NO TRACE

J. Smith-Cameron, NANCY

Best Supporting Male Actor

Raúl Castillo, WE THE ANIMALS

Adam Driver, BLACKKKLANSMAN

Richard E. Grant, CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?

Josh Hamilton, EIGHTH GRADE

John David Washington, MONSTERS AND MEN

Best Cinematography

Ashley Connor, MADELINE’S MADELINE

Diego Garcia, WILDLIFE

Benjamin Loeb, MANDY

Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, SUSPIRIA

Zak Mulligan, WE THE ANIMALS

Best Screenplay

Richard Glatzer (Writer/Story By), Rebecca Lenkiewicz & Wash Westmoreland, COLETTE

Nicole Holofcener & Jeff Whitty, CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?

Tamara Jenkins, PRIVATE LIFE

Boots Riley, SORRY TO BOTHER YOU

Paul Schrader FIRST REFORMED

Best First Screenplay

Bo Burnham, EIGHTH GRADE

Christina Choe, NANCY

Cory Finley, THOROUGHBREDS

Jennifer Fox, THE TALE

Quinn Shephard (Writer/Story By) and Laurie Shephard (Story By), BLAME

Best Editing

Joe Bini, YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Keiko Deguchi, Brian A. Kates & Jeremiah Zagar, WE THE ANIMALS

Luke Dunkley, Nick Fenton, Chris Gill & Julian Hart, AMERICAN ANIMALS

Anne Fabini, Alex Hall and Gary Levy, THE TALE

Nick Houy, MID90S

Best Documentary

HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING

MINDING THE GAP

OF FATHERS AND SONS

ON HER SHOULDERS

SHIRKERS

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?

Best International Film

BURNING (South Korea)

THE FAVOURITE (United Kingdom)

HAPPY AS LAZZARO (Italy)

ROMA (Mexico)

SHOPLIFTERS (Japan)

The Truer Than Fiction Award

Alexandria Bombach, ON HER SHOULDERS

Bing Liu, MINDING THE GAP

RaMell Ross, HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING

Producers Award

Jonathan Duffy and Kelly Williams

Gabrielle Nadig

Shrihari Sathe

The Someone to Watch Award

Alex Moratto, SÓCRATES

Ioana Uricaru, LEMONADE

Jeremiah Zagar, WE THE ANIMALS

The Bonnie Award

Debra Granik

Tamara Jenkins

Karyn Kusama

Robert Altman Award

SUSPIRIA

Director: Luca Guadagnino

Casting Directors: Avy Kaufman, Stella Savino

Ensemble Cast: Malgosia Bela, Ingrid Caven, Lutz Ebersdorf, Elena Fokina, Mia Goth, Jessica Harper, Dakota Johnson, Gala Moody, Chloë Grace Moretz, Renée Soutendijk, Tilda Swinton, Sylvie Testud, Angela Winkler

LFF 2018: If Beale Street Could Talk

Directed by: Barry Jenkins
Cast: KiKi Layne, Stephan James, Regina King, Colman Domingo

UK Release Date: February 8th, 2019

Written by Sarah Buddery

Despite the on-stage debacle that threatened to overshadow the award itself, Barry Jenkins’ debut feature Moonlight took home the biggest prize at last year’s Oscars, beating the favourite La La Land to Best Picture. Handling the whole thing as admirably as someone could, director Barry Jenkins rode the wave of emotions on the night like a true professional and is ready to have all the attention on him once again with his second film If Beale Street Could Talk.

Where Moonlight was perhaps intentionally cold and distant, Beale Street instantly feels much warmer and likeable, but once again Jenkins delivers a palpable sense of intimacy with the characters that immediately hooks you and draws you into their world. Moonlight felt transcendent, almost hypnotic in places, and despite its slightly more conventional narrative structure, If Beale Street Could Talk is as equally compelling.  

Beale Street tells the story of young lovers, Tish (Layne) and Fonny (James). With Fonny behind bars for a crime he didn’t commit, and Tish pregnant with his child, she desperately tries to prove his innocence so they can enjoy the family life they had always wanted together. Tish and Fonny deserve to go down as one of the best on-screen couples, certainly in recent memory, and watching them together is enough to make your heart soar. Jenkins’ camera focuses in on their eyes, their touch, and the small gestures, the considered silence and pauses speaking louder than words ever could.

Whilst their love story is at the heart of this film, it also has subtle thematic notions running through it that add even more weight. Its backdrop of racial tensions and discrimination, particularly in the attitude of white police officers towards black males, is something which is incredibly potent, but yet it never goes into preachy territory and never totally dominates over the characters and the narrative. Instead, it provides a background to these characters, and its relevance to today means that despite its period setting, we can instantly relate with them and their experiences.

The warmth and love of Beale Street positively radiates through the screen and there is wonderful tenderness to both Jenkins’ direction and his writing. Particularly in the scenes with Tish’s family which are wonderfully written and astutely observed.

Jenkins is undeniably an exciting filmmaker, and he succeeds in following up Moonlight by more than surpassing the unfairly high expectations placed upon him. It is unfair to compare the two films because they are so different, but Beale Street is undeniably more accessible and much easier watch. It doesn’t stray from some hard-hitting topics, and its ending is crushingly bittersweet, but watching this love story play out is a privilege. Awards success may just be beckoning his name once again…

Sarah’s Verdict:

4

New Trailer For Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Released

“Based on the novel by James Baldwin, “If Beale Street Could Talk” is the story of Tish, a newly-engaged Harlem woman who races against the clock to prove her lover’s innocence while carrying their first-born child. It is a celebration of love told through the story of a young couple, their families and their lives, trying to bring about justice through love, for love and the promise of the American dream.”

Directed by: Barry Jenkins

Cast: Kiki Layne, Stephan James, Colman Domingo, Diego Luna, Pedro Pascal, Ed Skrein, Dave Franco

Release Date:  January 18th, 2019

First Trailer For Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Has Arrived

“Based on the novel by James Baldwin, “If Beale Street Could Talk” is the story of Tish, a newly-engaged Harlem woman who races against the clock to prove her lover’s innocence while carrying their first-born child. It is a celebration of love told through the story of a young couple, their families and their lives, trying to bring about justice through love, for love and the promise of the American dream.”

Directed by: Barry Jenkins

Cast: Kiki Layne, Stephan James, Colman Domingo, Diego Luna, Pedro Pascal, Ed Skrein, Dave Franco

Release Date:  January 18th, 2019