Brand New Trailer For M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Glass’ Released

“From Unbreakable, Bruce Willis returns as David Dunn as does Samuel L. Jackson as Elijah Price, known also by his pseudonym Mr. Glass. Joining from Split are James McAvoy, reprising his role as Kevin Wendell Crumb and the multiple identities who reside within, and Anya Taylor-Joy as Casey Cooke, the only captive to survive an encounter with The Beast. Following the conclusion of Split, Glass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb’s superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men.”

Directed by: M. Night Shyamalan

Cast: Samuel L. Jackson,  Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Anya Taylor-Joy, Sarah Paulson

Release Date: January 18th, 2019

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Jean Begins To Lose Control In The First ‘Dark Phoenix’ Trailer

“In DARK PHOENIX, the X-MEN face their most formidable and powerful foe: one of their own, Jean Grey. During a rescue mission in space, Jean is nearly killed when she is hit by a mysterious cosmic force. Once she returns home, this force not only makes her infinitely more powerful, but far more unstable. Wrestling with this entity inside her, Jean unleashes her powers in ways she can neither comprehend nor contain. With Jean spiraling out of control, and hurting the ones she loves most, she begins to unravel the very fabric that holds the X-Men together. Now, with this family falling apart, they must find a way to unite — not only to save Jean’s soul, but to save our very planet from aliens who wish to weaponize this force and rule the galaxy.”

Directed by: Simon Kinberg

Cast: James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Tye Sheridan, Alexandra Shipp, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Evan Peters, and Jessica Chastain

Release Date: February 14th, 2019

Official ‘Dark Phoenix’ Synopsis Released Ahead Of The First Trailer Tonight!

20th Century Fox have this afternoon announced that the first trailer for the long awaited X-Men sequel, Dark Phoenix, will be aired tonight on the Late Late Show in the US, and will arrive online around the same time.

The film, which was originally scheduled to release November this year but was pushed back to allow for reshoots, also has it’s first official synopsis and poster!

“In DARK PHOENIX, the X-MEN face their most formidable and powerful foe: one of their own, Jean Grey. During a rescue mission in space, Jean is nearly killed when she is hit by a mysterious cosmic force. Once she returns home, this force not only makes her infinitely more powerful, but far more unstable. Wrestling with this entity inside her, Jean unleashes her powers in ways she can neither comprehend nor contain. With Jean spiraling out of control, and hurting the ones she loves most, she begins to unravel the very fabric that holds the X-Men together. Now, with this family falling apart, they must find a way to unite — not only to save Jean’s soul, but to save our very planet from aliens who wish to weaponize this force and rule the galaxy.”

Who are you most excited to see return in Dark Phoenix?

Directed by: Simon Kinberg

Cast: James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Tye Sheridan, Alexandra Shipp, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Evan Peters, and Jessica Chastain

Release Date: February 14th, 2019

SDCC: First Trailer For M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Glass’ Released!

From Unbreakable, Bruce Willis returns as David Dunn as does Samuel L. Jackson as Elijah Price, known also by his pseudonym Mr. Glass.

Joining from Split are James McAvoy, reprising his role as Kevin Wendell Crumb and the multiple identities who reside within, and Anya Taylor-Joy as Casey Cooke, the only captive to survive an encounter with The Beast.

Following the conclusion of Split, Glass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb’s superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men.

Directed by: M. Night Shyamalan

Cast: Samuel L. Jackson,  Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Anya Taylor-Joy, Sarah Paulson

Release Date: January 18th, 2019

Reel Women: May UK Releases

Written by Elena Morgan

At the start of each month we will be highlighting the films that will be released in UK cinemas that month, that are written and/or directed by women- a little feature we like to call ‘Reel Women’. As someone who’s taken part in the #52FilmsbyWomen for the past few years, I’ve started paying at least a little attention to who is writing and directing what I watch. It’s an enlightening experience and it’s a good way to watch films that I might not have normally have thought about and discover different filmmakers.

Now it’s time to look at May’s releases that are made by women. This month there are a whole host of genres including comedy, thriller, and documentary.

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4 May

I Feel Pretty
Directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein | Written by: Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein

Renee (Amy Schumer) struggles with insecurities about her body and her abilities, that is until she bangs her head and wakes up believing she’s the most beautiful and capable woman on the planet.

This is both Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein’s feature-length directorial debut but together they’ve written some rom-com classics like ‘Never Been Kissed’ and the romantic drama ‘The Vow’.

Mary and the Witch’s Flower
Directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi Written by Riko Sakaguchi and Hiromasa Yonebayashi

The first film from new Japanese animation company, Studio Ponoc, ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower’ is about a young girl who discovers a world of magic and danger after she picks a flower that only blooms once every seven years.

Riko Sakaguchi has written multiple television series and the Oscar nominated Studio Ghibli film, ‘The Tale of the Princess Kaguya’.

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11 May

How to Talk to Girls at Parties
Directed by John Cameron Mitchell | Written by Philippa Goslett and John Cameron Mitchell

It’s 1977 in London and when Enn (Alex Sharp) and his friends stubble across a weird party they meet alien Zan (Elle Fanning) who becomes fascinated with them, Earth and everything punk. Philippa Goslett has written four feature films including ‘Holy Money’ and ‘Mary Magdalene’.

Life of the Party
Directed by Ben Falcone | Written by Ben Falcone and Melissa McCarthy

After her husband suddenly asks for a divorce, Deanna (Melissa McCarthy) decides to join her teenage daughter (Molly Gordon) at college so she can complete her degree. Melissa McCarthy is a hilarious comedian who’s starred in so many great films like ‘The Heat’, ‘Bridesmaids’ and ‘Spy’. ‘Life of the Party’ is the third film she’s co-written with husband Ben Falcone after ‘The Boss’ and ‘Tammy’.

Raazi
Directed by Meghna Gulzar | Written by Meghna Gulzar and Bhavani Iyer

A thriller about Sehmat (Aalia Bhatt), a Kashmiri spy who is married to Iqbal (Vicky Kaushal), a Pakistani man during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, as she attempts to balance being a wife, mother and spy.

‘Raazi’ is Meghna Gulzar’s fourth feature film. Her previous film ‘Talvar’, is on Netflix and is well worth a watch. Bhavani Iyer has multiple writing credits to her name including the TV series ‘24: India’, the Indian remake of ‘24′.

Revenge
Directed by Coralie Fargeat | Written by Coralie Fargeat

Jen (Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz) is enjoying a romantic getaway with her wealthy boyfriend, until his sleazy friends arrive for a hunting trip. When the situation abruptly turns to violence and Jen is left for dead, she prepares to take bloody revenge on them all.

Revenge is Coralie Fargeat’s debut feature film and she also was one of its editors.

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18 May

A Love That Never Dies
Directed by Jimmy Edmonds and Jane Harris

A documentary following Jimmy and Jane, who lost their son seven years previously, as they take a road trip across the USA to meet other grieving parents and to see how and why different people grieve.

This is Jane Harris’ first film.

Montparnasse Bienvenue
Directed by Léonor Serraille | Written by Clémence Carré, Bastien Daret and Léonor Serraille

Paula Simonian (Laetitia Dosch) is in her early-thirties, is broke and single. She’s spirited yet directionless as she struggles to get by in the lively Parisian metropolis; but if she can make it there, she’ll make it anywhere.

This is Léonor Serraille’s first feature film and it won her the Golden Camera award, which is the award for best first feature film, at Cannes Film Festival last year. ‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’ has won 10 awards and been nominated for 14 more. Clémence Carré has previously worked with Serraille as she edited Serraille’s short film ‘Body’.

Submergence
Directed by Wim Wenders | Written by Erin Dignam

While captured by jihadist fighters, Scotsman James Moore (James McAvoy) remembers meeting scientist Danielle Flinders (Alicia Vikander) who is preparing to dive in a submersible to the ocean floor. Both in their own confinements, they remember their brief yet intense romance as they struggle with what lies ahead.

Erin Digman’s previous writing credit was ‘The Last Face’ starring Charlize Theron and Javier Bardem. Digman’s directorial and screenplay debut was ‘Denial’ which was nominated for the Grad Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival in 1990.

Cargo
Directed by Yolanda Ramke and Ben Howling | Written by Yolanda Ramke

Stranded in rural Australia after a violent pandemic, Andy (Martin Freeman) is a desperate father trying to find somewhere safe for his infant daughter. ‘Cargo’ is Yolanda Ramke’s first feature film and it is an adaptation of the short film of the same name she and Ben Howling made in 2013.

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25 May

Edie
Directed by Simon Hunter | Written by Elizabeth O’Halloran

After the death of her controlling husband, Edith Moore (Sheila Hancock) decides to attempt a lifelong ambition and climb a mountain in Scotland.

This is Elizabeth O’Halloran’s first screenplay.

The Breadwinner
Directed by Nora Twomey | Written by Anita Doron

After her father is thrown in jail, a young girl (Saara Chaudry) disguises herself as a boy in order to provide for her family.

‘The Breadwinner’ was nominated for Best Animated Feature at this years Oscars. Nora Twomey co-directed Cartoon Saloon’s first feature film ‘The Secret of Kells’. Anita Doran is a writer and director who has directed five feature films.

The Incredible Story of the Giant Pear
Directed by Amalie Næsby Fick, Jørgen Lerdam and Philip Einstein Lipski | Written by Bo Hr. Hansen

When friends Mitcho (Liva Elvira Magnussen) and Sebastian (Alfred Bjerre Larsen) find a message in a bottle, they go on an adventure inside a giant pear to find the missing mayor of their quaint town.

‘The Incredible Story of the Giant Pear’ is Amalie Næsby Fick’s first feature film.

Zama
Directed by Lucrecia Martel | Written by Lucrecia Martel

Don Diego de Zama (Daniel Giménez Cacho), a Spanish officer of the seventeenth century waits in Paraguay for news of his transfer to Buenos Aires. When he hears a man called Vicuña Porto (Matheus Nachtergaele) is raping women and attacking villages, Zama decides to help those in need.

Lucrecia Martel has won numerous awards including Best Film and Best Director for ‘The Headless Woman’ at the Argentinean Academy Awards, and the Alfred Bauer Award at the Berlin International Film Festival for ‘La Ciénaga. Zama’ is Martel’s fifth feature film.

Ibiza
Directed by Alex Richanback | Written by Lauryn Kahn

Harper (Gillian Jacobs) and her two best friends fly to Spain to find a hot DJ.

Lauryn Kahn has written over a dozen short films and Ibiza is her first feature film. It’s also one of Netflix’s original movies.


Those are the fifteen films that are written and/or directed by women and are being released in the UK this month. Some of these are likely to have smaller releases than others, especially foreign language films like ‘Montparnasse Bienvenue’ and ‘Zama’, but there is a couple of Netflix Originals here too, so you can watch them in the comfort of your own home. By writing this post I have discovered many UK releases I was previously unaware of, and I hope some of these films might have piqued your interest too.

We’d love to hear your thoughts on any of these films you if catch them this month! Be sure to leave us a message in the comments below, or tweet us at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE

‘New Mutants’ Release Pushed Back AGAIN Along With ‘Dark Phoenix’ As Fox Shuffles Dates

Fox’s X-Men spin-off ‘New Mutants’, directed by Josh Boone, has been pushed back yet again. Originally set to release next month on April 22nd, it was announced towards the end of last year that the film was under-going re-shoots (and even adding in a new character) and consequently the release date was pushed back to February 22nd, 2019. Variety are now reporting that it has been pushed back even further and now won’t hit cinema screens until August 2nd, 2019!

The latest film in Fox’s X-Men franchise, ‘Dark Phoenix’, has also now been pushed back and will now release February 22nd, 2019 – it’s original release date was November 2nd, 2018. There are only a few confirmed details of ‘Dark Phoenix’ so far, but what we do know is that it will take place a whole decade after Apocalypse tried to end the world in 2016’s ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ and confirmed to return to their respective roles are James McAvoy, Sophie Turner, Tye Sheridan, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Alexandra Shipp, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Evan Peters, and Nicholas Hoult. Jessica Chastain also joins this sequel, but all we know about her mysterious character Lilandra so far is that she’s out to get Phoenix.

The Freddie Mercury biopic ‘Bohemian Rhapsody‘, which stars Rami Malek, takes a leap forward into ‘Dark Phoenix’s’ original release date of November 2nd 2018, after the biopic was scheduled for a Christmas Day 2018 release.

What are your thoughts on these date changes? Do they make you worried about the end product or do you think the wait will be worth it?

 

New ‘X:Men: Dark Phoenix’ Details Revealed

EW have revealed their latest cover, which is our first look at Sophie Turner as Jean Grey / Phoenix in the latest X:Men film, ‘Dark Phoenix’. New details the films plot and new/returning characters have also been revealed:

“Set in 1992, about 10 years after the events of last year’s X-Men: Apocalypse, Dark Phoenix opens with the X-Men, including Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence), Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Storm (Alexandra Shipp), Nightcrawler (Kodi Smit-McPhee), and Quicksilver (Evan Peters), in a new, unexpected role: national heroes. Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) even lands on the cover of Time magazine. But his growing ego puts the team at risk. “Pride is starting to get the better of him, and he is pushing the X-Men to more extreme missions,” Kinberg says. After they’re dispatched to space for a rescue mission, a solar flare hits the X-Jet and the surge of energy ignites a malevolent, power-hungry new force within Jean (Sophie Turner)— the Phoenix.”

Jessica Chastain joins this sequel as “an otherworldly shapeshifter” – a presumably villainous character that we’ll learn more about soon! The cast also promise a “massive twist halfway through that will irrevocably change the course of the franchise”, which already has us all kinds of excited!

‘X-Men: Dark Phoenix’ arrives in cinemas November 2nd 2018

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Synopsis for M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Glass’ Released

M. Night Shyamalan recently confirmed that pre-production will begin on on the upcoming ‘Unbreakable’ and ‘Split’ sequel, ‘Glass’, tomorrow! Now, Universal Pictures have released a brief synopsis for the film.

“Following the conclusion of ‘Split’, Glass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb’s superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men. This riveting culmination of his worldwide blockbusters will be produced by Shyamalan and Jason Blum.”

Confirmed to appear in M. Night ’s third film in the ‘Unbreakable’ universe are Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Anya Taylor-Joy, who will be returning in their respective roles, and newcomer Sarah Paulson.

‘GLASS’ IS CURRENTLY SCHEDULED TO RELEASE JANUARY 18TH 2019

Atomic Blonde

Year: 2017
Director: David Leitch
Starring: Charlize Theron, James McAvoy, John Goodman, Sofia Boutella, Toby Jones

Written by Abbie Eales

Former stuntman David Leitch’s first solo directorial outing is somewhat of a mixed bag. Set in November 1989, the just-at-the-end-of-the-cold-war spy thriller takes place against the backdrop of the fall of the Berlin wall.

The opening scene sees  a mustachioed man being chased through Berlin’s snowy graffiti-festooned backstreets (complete with posters of smiley faces and CND symbols) to a soundtrack of New Order’s ‘Blue Monday’ – “IT’S 1989!” in case you missed the opening credits. Eventually we see him being run over twice and then shot, in a less than glamourous KGB hit. So the tone is set for ‘Atomic Blonde’. Or at least for part of the film, because tonally, it’s all over the shop.

Charlize Theron plays Lorraine Broughton, an MI6 agent, who is sent to Berlin to retrieve a list of assets, uncover a double agent and perhaps bring some justice for the murder of our mustachioed man, her former lover. So far, so John Le Carre. Aiding Broughton on her mission is David Percival (the ever charismatic James McAvoy on best ‘Filth’ form), who may or may not be the double agent, but he definitely has ‘The Prince’ by Machiavelli on his book shelf, *wink to camera*.

What follows for the next hundred minutes is largely nonsense. Some very stylish nonsense, then some confusing nonsense, with a few moments of goddamn brilliance just to confuse matters.

The first half hour is largely a neon-lit music video, with lingering shots of Theron letting smoke spill from her perfect pout, while the plot is occasionally alluded to in heavy-handed globs of dialogue, all the while glorious ‘80’s music plays on a constant “Jeez, wasn’t ‘89 a vintage year for music?” loop. It looks beautiful, sounds beautiful and being a shallow short of person, I would probably have enjoyed it if it continued in the same vein.

However the narrative meanders about for so long while Theron smokes in various Berlin bars and restaurants, that you forget why she’s out there. We start to wonder where has McAvoy gone? Who is this French woman? Who is Satchel? Do we even care anymore? ‘Atomic Blonde’s’ questions don’t arise as a result of a clever plot however, but just sheer confusion.

Thankfully the latter half of the film sees a SUPERB fight scene, all filmed in one take, which shows off not only Theron’s action chops, but also David Leich’s potential as a director. The music stops, the neon is nowhere to be seen and things get brutal, bloody and far more interesting than the previous 60+ minutes. THAT’S the film I really would have wanted to see. Dispense with the smoke-ringed glamour and get Theron really kicking ass.

Theron is magnetic as Broughton, (although Lorraine is not a super sexy spy name, let’s face it), all effortless physicality and sideways glances. Her wardrobe throughout made me want to burn all my clothes on my return home, as she is stylish as hell and I am fully subscribed to the ‘Atomic Blonde’ autumn/winter collection. However, she is also pretty one dimensional. A 40+ year old woman playing a kickass, bisexual, cold war era spy should be exciting and lead to a different feel to the spy genre, but somehow that is all fairly cosmetic. We never really engage with Broughton as a character, she is all veneer and could just as well be Jason Bourne in Louboutins.

While ‘Atomic Blonde’ is a confused affair, there are enough visual thrills to make up for the uneven plot, with some terrific performances managing to raise it to the status of entertaining diversion rather than all out car-wreck.

Abbie’s rating: 6.5 out of 10