Weekend BO Report: ‘Venom’ Smashes The October Opening Record With $80m

Written by Dapo Olowu

In a year where ‘Black Panther’ became the 3rd biggest film of all time in the States, ‘Infinity War’ broke both the domestic and worldwide opening record, and ‘Incredibles 2’ became the only animation to break $600m in the U.S.A., it’s really no surprise that Spider-Man spinoff ‘Venom’, even with poor reviews, became another superhero record-breaker. Its $80.3m opening completely smashes the October record of $55.8m held by 2013s ‘Gravity’, and almost certainly has Sony greenlighting a sequel as we speak.

It’s almost double that of nearest competitor ‘A Star is Born’, whose $42.9m is the 4th biggest musical opening of all time (behind ‘Beauty & The Beast’, ‘Pitch Perfect 2’, and ‘High School Musical 3’). In-line with our expectations, it also grossed around $14.2m from 31 countries, including $5.3m from the U.K. This, of course, again couldn’t compare to the might of ‘Venom’; its $125.2m from around 60 countries gave it the October record for a global opening, too. What’s even more impressive is that it managed well over $100m without China, who isn’t getting a release until November 2nd.

The question now for the two films is, where can they go from here? Both films have very different target audiences in mind, with ‘Venom’s young male audience (59% male, 64% under 25) differing massively from ‘ASIB’s older female crowd (66% female, 86% over 25). The two thus won’t have to concern themselves with eating into eachother’s markets, and while ‘Venom’ has barely any superhero competition until ‘Aquaman’, ‘ASIB’s critical reception (including an A on Cinemascore) should provide it with a lengthy Box Office run.

To be precise, a performance similar to ‘Gone Girl’ would see Bradley Cooper’s directing debut close in on $200m domestically, and a run like ‘The Amazing Spider-Man 2’s would see ‘Venom’ end on a solid $180m – a success story for both movies. Of course, ‘TASM 2’ being a summer blockbuster and ‘Gone Girl’ being based on a best-selling book means we should take these comparisons with a pinch of salt, but their opening weekend performances show real potential for breakout hits.

Last weekend’s winner ‘Night School’ saw a 54% fall to gross $12.5m, in behind ‘Smallfoot’s $14.4m. The Universal Studios comedy is now just $3m away from $50m domestically, while ‘Smallfoot’s just $7.7m away from the same number. Rom-com ‘Crazy Rich Asians$2.2m leaves it on $169.2m in the U.S., just $7m away from becoming the 5th biggest romantic comedy in American history.

We only saw ‘Venom’ doing $65m this weekend, so how surprised were you by its gross? And with Bradley Cooper’s directing debut earning rave reviews and $42.9m, is a star truly born here? Let us know your thoughts on Twitter and Instagram – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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REVIEW: Venom

Year: 2018
Directed by: Ruben Fleischer
Starring: Tom Hardy, Michelle Williams, Riz Ahmed

Written by Megan Williams

Ever since I went to see Spiderman 3, I’ve been waiting for Sony to grant Venom a second chance and give the character a stand-alone film. And, after writing two articles on the trailers, Venom is finally here!

Tom Hardy plays Eddie Brock, a reporter who is assigned an interview with Carlton Drake (Riz Ahmed), the CEO of the ‘Life Foundation’. After finding out that Carlton is experimenting on people by combining them with alien symbiotes, Eddie accidentally becomes intertwined with one of the symbiotes named Venom.

When the film was released it was met with critical slating, saying that the film’s tone was odd and uneven and that, overall, it wasn’t very good. However, I am in the minority. Venom is nowhere near as bad as critics are saying.

Tom Hardy was great as Eddie Brock and the voice of Venom; their interactions with each other was the biggest highlight of the film. It also brought in a lot of humour that blended in effectively with the visuals; most of it came from Venom’s dialogue, as he reacted to each scenario, as well as Eddie’s dialogue and actions towards this unfamiliar creature.

The soundtrack and score were also fantastic, bringing in a mixture of classical music, hip-hop and rock, all of which suited the film’s tone and story. Venom wouldn’t have looked out of place if it had been released in 2005, and while some people would see this as a problem, I personally didn’t; the presentation of the film worked for the most part.

Unfortunately, the first act’s tone and pacing was a little uneven and seemed ‘uncomfortable’ with setting the story up. However, once Venom was introduced, these aspects improved and the film flowed a lot better than it did in the first act. Another issue I had was with the CGI. Throughout most of the film, it was fantastic and Venom’s portrayal was very accurate to the comic books, which I loved. However, the CGI was extremely dodgy and hard to follow in the third act so, unfortunately, it wasn’t consistent.

Overall, Venom was entertaining, funny and a lot of fun. It is not as bad as initial reviews have been saying and, if you are still interested in seeing it, then I would recommend it.

MEGAN’S RATING:

4

New ‘Venom’ Trailer | Megan’s Thoughts

Written by Megan Williams

Back in May, I wrote an article on the first full-length trailer for the solo Venom movie, starring Tom Hardy, and to say I’m excited for this film is an understatement: I grew up reading the ‘Lethal Protector’ series as well as the original and ‘Ultimate Spiderman’ story arc. Next to Spiderman, Venom is my favourite Marvel character. And it looks like the final trailer has now been released, showing us more of the symbiote, including footage of him talking more and giving us more of the plotline. Venom seems to act and talk like he did in the 90’s comics, which, while I’m glad to see that, I don’t know whether this will translate well to the overall film.

While we’re on the topic of talking, I’m getting déjà vu: I’m remembering when The Dark Knight Rises came out and not being able to understand what Bane was saying (also played by Tom Hardy)…Yes, we have the same problem again except, this time, with Venom. While the voice isn’t as bad as Bane, I still had to re-watch a couple of scenes in the trailer because I didn’t understand what was being said.

The trailer also shows us another symbiote that I suspect is either Carnage or Riot (Riot is one of five symbiotes that was spawned from Venom via experiments done by the Life Foundation-a storyline that was introduced in the ‘Lethal Protector’ comic series), meaning that this will probably feature multiple symbiotic characters. This could either be disastrous (Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Spider-Man 3 anyone?) or it could work. It all depends on how the film handles this, in terms of pacing and screen-time per character.

There are a few moments in the trailer where the CGI looks extremely dodgy, especially in the final shot with Venom and maybe-Riot. However, I don’t know whether the visual effects for the film have been completed or not; it could still be slightly incomplete (I’m more telling myself this though!).

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As well as a new trailer being released, Sony has also revealed the international poster and it. IS. AWESOME! Take a look below:

It’s a lot better than the previous one, which looked like a bad fan-made poster.

Overall, I’m still on-board with this film and I still can’t wait for it. However, I do think some of Venom’s dialogue needs to be tweaked a little to make it sound slightly more clearer, and I’m hoping a couple of the CGI shots are incomplete because they look a little dodgy and cartoonish at the moment.

On a final note, I think I’ve found the most terrifying still from the trailer:

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SWEET DREAMS MARVEL FANS!

Venom Is Unleashed In Final Trailer

“One of Marvel’s most enigmatic, complex and badass characters comes to the big screen, starring Academy Award® nominated actor Tom Hardy as the lethal protector Venom.”

Directed by: Ruben Fleischer

Cast: Tom Hardy, Michelle Williams, Riz Ahmed, Jenny Slate, Woody Harrelson

Release Date: October 5th, 2018

‘Venom’ Trailer: Megan’s Thoughts

Written by Megan Williams

In February, the teaser trailer for Sony’s ‘Venom’ film was released and was met with complete outrage because Venom wasn’t featured in it at all. While I mostly liked the teaser, I will admit that I was slightly disappointed that it didn’t show even a small glimpse of the symbiotic anti-hero, and it did make me nervous regarding the character’s appearance and how Sony would handle it. Well, those worries have now been laid to rest because a full-length trailer has been released; giving us our first proper look at Venom-and it is glorious!

It seems like Sony have learnt their lesson from the abomination that was the ‘Spiderman 3’ portrayal of Venom: the voice and look of the character is extremely faithful to the comics and even to the 90’s cartoon. I also like that Venom refers to himself as ‘we’; it’s a small but important character detail, and it shows that Sony wants to portray the character correctly this time.

I thought this when the casting was first announced and my opinion still stands now: Tom Hardy is perfect casting for Eddie Brock/Venom, and I think he’ll be fantastic in the film. However, I still don’t know how Tom Holland is going to fit into this, if the rumours of his appearance in the film are true. It looks like the film is mainly influenced by Venom’s story arc in the ‘Ultimate Spiderman’ comics: the idea that people are undergoing symbiote experiments is loosely based on a plot line that the ‘Ultimate’ comics did, and it was the cause of Venom’s birth. If the film is going to go down this route then maybe Venom won’t have the spider symbol on his chest? As for Tom Holland, my guess is that he’ll appear in the background or in an end credits scene after the main film has taken place.

I only have two negative things to say about the trailer: the first one is the way one of the characters pronounces symbiote (she pronounces it as ‘syBYEote’), which, while it annoys me, is very nit-picky. The other thing that worries me is whether the shots with Venom are from the third act only; I’m hoping Venom gets introduced in the second act, allowing us to see more of him and Eddie Brock, and not just Eddie Brock on his own. As well as this, I’m hoping the final shot of the trailer is not the final shot of the film. Hopefully Sony has learnt their lesson from ‘Amazing Spiderman 2’, where the last shot of that film’s trailer was actually the final shot of the whole film.

Overall, I’m really looking forward to ‘Venom’; it’s actually my most anticipated film of this year and, after seeing this trailer, my excitement has grown even more so than it did beforehand.

The plot is unknown as of writing.

You can watch the full trailer here

Venom’ will be in cinemas on the 5th October.

Directed by: Ruben Fleischer
Cast:
 Tom Hardy, Michelle Williams, Riz Ahmed, Jenny Slate, Woody Harrelson

Release Date: October 5th, 2018

Meet Venom In A Brand New Trailer!

“One of Marvel’s most enigmatic, complex and badass characters comes to the big screen, starring Academy Award® nominated actor Tom Hardy as the lethal protector Venom.”

Directed by: Ruben Fleischer

Cast: Tom Hardy, Michelle Williams, Riz Ahmed, Jenny Slate, Woody Harrelson

Release Date: October 5th, 2018

First Teaser For ‘Venom’ Has Arrived!

“One of Marvel’s most enigmatic, complex and badass characters comes to the big screen, starring Academy Award® nominated actor Tom Hardy as the lethal protector Venom.”

Directed by: Ruben Fleischer

Cast: Tom Hardy, Michelle Williams, Jenny Slate, Riz Ahmed

Release Date: October 5th, 2018

The Greatest Showman

Year: 2017
Directed By: Michael Gracey
Cast: Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, Zac Efron, Zendaya, Rebecca Ferguson, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II 

Written by Fiona Underhill

Perhaps it is fitting to conclude 2017 with a film simultaneously both awful and fantastic. Truly dreadful wigs, bizarre CGI, catchy songs, Zac & Zendaya – ‘The Greatest Showman’ really does have it all. A passion project of Hugh Jackman’s; this movie has been in gestation for at least a decade, to the extent that I’m surprised he didn’t take the directorial reins himself. Instead, we have the inexperienced Michael Gracey – whose IMDb credits are mostly visual effects and art department – which is….intriguing once you’ve seen ‘The Greatest Showman’. There are rumours that ‘Logan’s’ James Mangold had to come to the rescue on ‘The Greatest Showman’ and this certainly makes sense of the tonal and editing inconsistencies. Hugh Jackman has certainly had quite the year: starting with an Oscar-worthy turn in Logan and ending with this.

I sound as if I’m being really negative about this film and while it is a trashy mess, I will say that I immediately wanted to watch the whole thing again once it was over. For those going to the cinema expecting an historically accurate biopic of PT Barnum will be sorely disappointed. This being a glitzy, feel-good musical, it certainly glosses over the fact that Barnum was not the ‘saviour of the down-trodden and oppressed’ as portrayed here. In fact, his real-life treatment of the disabled people, people of colour and animals who populated his ‘freak shows’ left much to be desired. He certainly exploited them (even after their deaths) and presented them as exotic curiosities, simply for being ‘foreign’ or outside of the Victorian norm. Barnum’s exaggeration and manipulation of certain characteristics is touched on in the film, but much more could have been made of one man constructing a reality to fit the bigoted viewpoint of the audience. The parallels with another purveyor of fake news and the invention of show business and celebrity could have been an interesting exploration, but instead we have a paper-thin musical.

IF you can choose to view ‘The Greatest Showman’ simply as a fictional fantasy, there is something to enjoy here. I am not above being excited by the sight of Zac Efron in a ringmaster’s costume and delighting in seeing him singing and dancing again. His duet with Hugh Jackman, when they make a business deal in a bar, punctuated by the rhythmic downing of shots is a thrilling spectacle. Zendaya is magnificent as a pink-haired flying trapeze artist, who shares another delightful duet with Zac. The casting of Michelle Williams, however, is so glaringly erroneous it lept out, even in the trailer. We are supposed to accept that Williams and Jackman (who have a 12 year age-gap) are the same age (they are portrayed as childhood sweethearts), she is donned in a long blonde wig and given a thankless task of a role. A total waste of Williams’ acting talents.

The songs are cheesy but catchy and I have sought them out since seeing the film. Some of the choices made in this film are so bizarre though; like the casting of Hugh Jackman as his own boss for no apparent reason in a short scene. Rebecca Ferguson is cast (in another terrible wig) as a singer who Barnum inexplicably takes on tour across the country, getting into yet more debt. Another dubious casting choice, when apparently she did not do her own singing.

Frankly, thinking back on this film is giving me a headache. It is a frustrating mess, with much to mock. However, I do admit to being swept along with some of the musical numbers and circus scenes. Keala Settle’s barn-storming performance as Lettie Lutz – The Bearded Lady, leading her troop in a rousing number did stir something inside me. So, ultimately I have to accept that a large part of me enjoyed ‘The Greatest Showman’, because after all THIS IS ME.

Fiona’s Rating: 6.0/10

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All The Money In The World

Year: 2017
Director: Ridley Scott
Starring: Michelle Williams, Christopher Plummer, Mark Wahlberg, Charlie Plummer

Written by Jessica Peña

What a treat it is to get Ridley Scott’s latest, ‘All the Money in the World,’ in the US on Christmas Day. I found a great deal of adoration in this film. Bouncing back from a major derailment, the film is a robust drama with powerful performances by its lead ensemble. It’s hard to form an expectation going into the film. Rest assured, Ridley Scott secured an impressive outcome.

‘All the Money in the World’ tells of the real life 1973 kidnapping of John Paul Getty III, grandson to the richest man in the world, J. Paul Getty, the egocentric oil tycoon. The story follows Gail Getty (Michelle Williams) as she desperately tries to get her son back safely. A ransom of $17 million is put up for Paul’s return, and to the shock of the world, J. Paul Getty Sr. blatantly refuses. A man of lavish assets and an obsessive appreciation of old artefacts, he explains that the easy payment would bring all 14 of his grandchildren to be kidnapped. The stern J. Paul Getty will not stand for his money to be thrown away like that. For having expressed great love for Paul Getty III specifically, he is quite the selfish soul.

Scott’s latest film is a powerhouse with near perfect form, but I know what you really came here for. So let’s cut to the chase. Christopher Plummer crushes. The veteran actor proves himself to be an even more believable J. Paul Getty than what a prosthetic Kevin Spacey would’ve been. With just two months before release, news broke of sexual assault allegations made against Kevin Spacey. Immediately, the actor has since been blacklisted by Hollywood and much of the world, hopefully. There’s no denying that the outrage has circled ‘All the Money in the World’ with much attention and anticipation. It’s put a spotlight on Ridley Scott’s following move. From initial trailers, there was always something cringy about those pounds of makeup on Spacey. With all things considered, we still wonder what the Spacey final cut looks like. His work usually comes off very defined with sarcastic undertones, but having re-shot a total of twenty-two scenes with Plummer, Ridley Scott has welcomed in a much more sincere charisma to J. Paul Getty.

Reportedly Scott’s first choice for the role, Plummer was called in immediately following a 48 hour decision to recast. Scott is quoted expressing his decision to push the film forward and not risk failure. He wanted the work of the cast and crew to be honored and not damaged by Spacey’s involvement in the project. The shift is almost seamless. There is a brief, somewhat obvious scene where J. Paul Getty is in the desert attending to his oil business where Plummer was green screened in. Scott had nine 18 hour days to get his ducks in a row, and it is well worth the effort. Adapted from John Pearson’s book, ‘Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty’, this film sets up some serious examination of the wealthy man, but doesn’t completely make it about him. It was great to see a film that involved more than one calculated story.

Believe it or not, Michelle Williams carries this film so well. As Gail Getty is put through an enormous amount of stress and finds herself battling her father-in-law to pay up, Williams delivers stellar aggression as a woman who knows how to stick it to the richest man in the world. When J. Paul Getty refuses to pay the ransom, Gail is quick to put in efforts to rescue her son. She doesn’t settle to being paid out and silent in all of this. Being married into the Getty family proves be a battle in itself. Williams graces it with her Oscar-worthy energy. Mark Wahlberg is exceptional to the narrative as Getty Sr.’s business manager and ex-CIA agent, Fletcher Chase. We don’t see an award-winning Wahlberg, but Fletcher Chase grows a little in realizing just how selfish the great oilman really is. Charlie Plummer, no relation to Christopher, is certainly worth the attention as the 16-year-old, J. Paul Getty III. His performance cements him as a promising young actor. Let’s keep a little eye on him moving forward.

Let us not overlook Romain Duris, a French actor who plays one of the Italian kidnappers. His character has somewhat of a gratifying story. Interacting with Paul Getty III throughout the time they have him, we see a little bit of Stockholm Syndrome unravel. The story has its spectacular character moments there and in Gail Getty’s perseverance. Where it feels it should pick up momentum in its third act, it instead sits on murky exposition. Luckily, it wakes up in no time and closes off as a solid drama that was much better than I had expected.

From an opening shot that nods to Fellini’s ‘La Dolce Vita,’ to the gruesome cutting of an ear, ‘All the Money in the World’ manages to pull off a great technical achievement despite its publicized setback. It is a well grounded film that helps close 2017 on a strong note. It delves into what having all the money in the world does to someone and how it affects the children of the family. It deserves to be applauded for more than it’s magic trick of reshoots. The genius of it all is rooted from Ridley Scott’s impeccable direction.

Jessica’s Rating: 7.8 out of 10