Competition: Win A UV Digital Code For ‘Lady Bird’

Thanks to Sasha, we have one UV Digital code to give away for Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird and it couldn’t be easier to enter!

“The real success here is in the writing – it makes the whole thing feel so real. It is very funny – early scenes of Lady Bird ‘running for office’ in her school and coming into conflict with her teachers are hilarious. The naturalistic performances are also a key part of what makes this film so good.”

You can read our full verdict for Lady Bird, courtesy of Fiona, right here!

In Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig reveals herself to be a bold new cinematic voice with her directorial debut, excavating both the humor and pathos in the turbulent bond between a mother and her teenage daughter. Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) fights against but is exactly like her wildly loving, deeply opinionated and strong-willed mom (Laurie Metcalf), a nurse working tirelessly to keep her family afloat after Lady Bird’s father (Tracy Letts) loses his job. Set in Sacramento, California in 2002, amidst a rapidly shifting American economic landscape, Lady Bird is an affecting look at the relationships that shape us, the beliefs that define us, and the unmatched beauty of a place called home.

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A Rivalry Becomes A War In The First Trailer For ‘Mary Queen Of Scots’

‘Mary Queen of Scots’ explores the turbulent life of the charismatic Mary Stuart. Queen of France at 16 and widowed at 18, Mary defies pressure to remarry. Instead, she returns to her native Scotland to reclaim her rightful throne. But Scotland and England fall under the rule of the compelling Elizabeth 1.  Each young Queen beholds her “sister” in fear and fascination. Rivals in power and in love, and female regents in a masculine world, the two must decide how to play the game of marriage versus independence. Determined to rule as much more than a figurehead, Mary asserts her claim to the English throne, threatening Elizabeth’s sovereignty. Betrayal, rebellion, and conspiracies within each court imperil both thrones – and change the course of history.

Directed by: Josie Rourke

Cast: Margot Robbie, Saoirse Ronan, Jack Lowden, Joe Alwyn, Gemma Chan, David Tennant, Guy Pearce

Release Date: January 18th, 2019

The Seagull & On Chesil Beach

WRITTEN BY FIONA UNDERHILL

The Seagull

The Seagull‘ is an adaptation of the famous Chekhov play and features a stellar cast. Annette Bening stars as Irina, an established actress on the Moscow stage and Saoirse Ronan plays Nina; a country girl who aspires to make her way onto the stage also, Corey Stoll plays Boris; a famous author and Irina’s lover, Billy Howle plays Konstantin; Irina’s son and an aspiring writer,  Mare Winningham plays Polina; a housekeeper at Irina’s country estate, and Elisabeth Moss plays her daughter, Masha; a depressed alcoholic who is in love with Konstantin.

Envy is the central theme of the film; Konstantin burns with feelings of hot jealousy of Boris’ success, complicated by the fact that he’s also sleeping with his mother. At the start, Nina and Konstantin are lovers, so Masha is resentful towards her. Nina’s feelings of admiration towards Boris eventually become something more, leading to further tragedy for Konstantin. And Irina is jealous of Nina’s youth and dismissive of Konstantin’s attempts at writing. The unusual decision has been made for the cast to use American accents, which makes as much sense in a period Russian piece as the usual British RP. This gives actors like Brian Dennehy (whom I adore) more freedom and expression. I loved the score of this film and the theatricality – there is a lovely scene in the grounds of the country estate, where Konstantin puts on a play using shadow puppets. Bening is incredible, as always and I enjoyed this film overall.

FIONA’S RATING:

3.5

 

On Chesil Beach

On Chesil Beach’ has received extremely mixed reactions from critics and this made me even more intrigued to see it than I already was. This is the second Ian McEwen adaptation that Saoirse Ronan has starred in, after ‘Atonement‘. It follows newly-weds Florence (Ronan) and Edward (Billy Howle) on their wedding night in a hotel in Dorset (next to the eponymous beach). An awkward and excruciating evening unfolds, interspersed with flashbacks explaining how they have ended up this way. I loved this framing device and the unusual structure of this film – the story revealed its layers slowly and is all the more rewarding for it.

I have gone from being totally unaware of Billy Howle to seeing two of his films in one day. I am really impressed by him and he holds his own up against the multiple Oscar-nominee here. The casting of the two sets of parents is perfect – Florence’s parents are played by Emily Watson and Samuel West (two of my favourite English actors) – they are snobby Oxbridge types whose gradual darkness is revealed. Edward’s parents are played by Adrian Scarborough and the always-wonderful Anne-Marie Duff. Edward’s mother is brain damaged and this leads to some heart-breaking, but exquisitely played scenes.

Music plays a central role in the narrative and I loved its use, from Florence’s string quartet music to Edward’s burgeoning relationship with rock and roll. The production design is impeccable; particularly the hideous maroon silk bed in the honeymoon suite and the cluttered artistic chaos of Edward’s family home. The costume design is also notable – Florence’s electric blue dress in the wedding night scenes is in bold contrast to her state-of-mind. The dress particularly works well in one of my favourite scenes that takes place on the beach itself towards the end. The framing, blocking and focus-pulling in this scene are carefully controlled, almost as if Florence and Edward are chess pieces.

As with ‘Atonement’, point-of-view is a central theme and the structure allows you to gain the perspective of both the central characters. You can see the paths that have led these two people to this point in time and get a full understanding of why the night pans out as it does. I was slightly less keen on the two scenes that take place after the wedding night (with significant time-jumps).

On Chesil Beach‘ is a complex, mature film that is an impressive debut by director Dominic Cooke. I’m really looking forward to what Billy Howle does next, as he has made a significant impression. I don’t really understand the criticisms that have been levelled at this film, as I really loved it. It engaged and intrigued me throughout and the story goes in many interesting and unexpected directions. Ronan is as tremendous as always and it captures the period extremely well. I really recommend this film.

FIONA’S RATING:

4.5

 

‘Gotham Awards 2017’ Winners List

The 2017 Gotham Independent Film Awards took place last night, with ‘Call Me By Your Name’ walking away with the biggest award of the night for ‘Best Feature’ and Jordan Peele’s ‘Get Out‘ walked away with 3 awards, including the ‘Audience Award’ and ‘Breakthrough Director’.

Going into the awards, ‘Get Out’ had the highest amount of nominations with a total of 4, followed by 3 nominations for Greta Gerwigs acclaimed directorial debut, ‘Lady Bird‘. ‘I, Tonya’, ‘The Florida Project’, and ‘Good Times’ also had multiple nominations, including ‘Best Feature’ with ‘Get Out’, and the winner, ‘Call Me By Your Name’.

The full list of winners: 

Audience Award: Get Out
Best Actor: James Franco – The Disaster Artist
Best Actress: Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird
Best Documentary: Strong Island
Best Feature: Call Me By Your Name
Best Screenplay: Get Out
Breakthrough Actor: TimothĂ©e Chalamet – Call Me By Your Name
Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award: Jordan Peele – Get Out
Breakthrough Series – Long Form: Atlanta
Breakthrough Series – Short Form: The Strange Eyes of Dr. Myes

FotoJet (3)

Lady Bird

Year: 2017 (UK: 2018)
Directed by: Greta Gerwig
Cast: Saoirse Ronan, Odeya Rush, Timothée Chalamet, Lucas Hedges

Written by Fiona Underhill

Greta Gerwig is primarily known for her ‘auteur-muse’ relationship with director Noah Baumbach, which has produced such gems as ‘Frances Ha’, ‘Mistress America’ and ‘Greenberg’. I have also enjoyed watching her in the role of Natalie Portman’s best friend in the diverse ‘No Strings Attached’ and ‘Jackie’. Although she has directed before, this is Gerwig’s ‘mainstream’ directorial debut and she has very much stepped out from under Baumbach’s shadow.

There are a few surprising things about ‘Lady Bird’. Firstly, it is not set in New York, as one might expect from Gerwig, but in Sacramento. While it is the state capital of California, Sacramento is nowhere near as well known as Los Angeles or San Francisco and is described as the ‘mid-west of California’ in the film. It definitely has a small-town feel here and one that needs to be escaped, especially as Lady Bird literally lives on the wrong side of the tracks. I was also surprised to discover that it is set in 2002-2003, making the character of Lady Bird five years younger than me. Despite this age gap, many of the music and fashion references did feel painfully real to me and it doused the whole thing in the heavy pall of nostalgia; not all of it positive.

Soairse Ronan plays Christine McPherson, who insists on being called ‘Lady Bird’. She is a Catholic high school senior, dealing with typical problems such as friendships, boyfriends and what she’s going to do with the rest of her life. Her parents are going through financial problems, leading to her mother (in an amazing performance from Laurie Metcalf) working double shifts in a psychiatric hospital. Lady Bird and her best friend Julie (the very appealing Beanie Feldstein) decide to audition for the school musical, where Lady Bird immediately takes a shine to Danny (Lucas Hedges). Further down the line, Lady Bird gets involved with new friend ‘rich bitch’ Jenna and new boy, the rebellious Kyle (Timothee Chalamet) which works out about as well as could be expected.

The real success here is in the writing – it makes the whole thing feel so real. It is very funny – early scenes of Lady Bird ‘running for office’ in her school and coming into conflict with her teachers are hilarious. The naturalistic performances are also a key part of what makes this film so good. The 23 year old Ronan plays a 17/18 year old incredibly convincingly in a vanity-free performance, including showing her ‘adolescent’ skin and I would love to see her get a Best Actress Oscar nomination. I have heard everyone who has seen ‘Call Me By Your Name’ (still not out in the US) going crazy about Timothee Chalamet, but hadn’t really seen the appeal, based on photographs alone. Having now seen ‘Miss Stevens’ (recommended) and ‘Lady Bird’, I am beginning to see it more. He does have a magnetic screen presence and is very charismatic, even when playing an enormous douche, as he is here.

Smaller roles are taken by Lois Smith as one of the nuns at Lady Bird’s school and Stephen Henderson as the priest who runs the musical. Both put in funny and emotional turns. Another highlight is Lady Bird’s brother Miguel (a Berkeley graduate who now has a job bagging groceries) and his girlfriend Shelly who has moved in with the family. Lucas Hedges (both funny and devastating in last year’s ‘Manchester By The Sea’) gives another nuanced performance – demonstrating that he is definitely one to watch.

The other acting highlight is without doubt, Laurie Metcalf as Marion McPherson. This film is really about the mother-daughter relationship and is painfully real. There are the typical teenage conflicts, exacerbated by financial strains and Marion trying to keep her daughter’s college expectations in the real world. Of course, the real source of the conflict is Lady Bird’s rejection of Sacramento and her family, but this comes full circle into revealing the clear affection she has for both by the end. I almost had to watch the scene of Lady Bird trying on prom dresses through my fingers – its a scene that could have been pulled straight from my life. The audience’s empathy is pulled in both directions, between the two characters. Marion gets understandably frustrated by Lady Bird’s lack of appreciation for everything her family are doing for her. However, her mother’s hypercritical negativity does engender sympathy for Lady Bird, who at times, reaches out to her mother and is rejected. Safe to say, I was an emotional mess by the end, despite having laughed out loud throughout the whole film.

On fairly limited release in the US at the moment and not hitting the UK until February (which will be good timing for Oscar buzz), Lady Bird is definitely worth seeking out. There is something for all ages to identify with and you will find yourself torn between the generations, but ultimately feeling great affection for all of the characters. Lady Bird is a success because of the exceptional writing and directing from Greta Gerwig and I cannot wait to see what she does next.

Fiona’s Rating: 9.0 out of 10

Oscars 2016: The Nominees

The second biggest awards show in the film calendar (after the JumpCut UK Film Awards, of course) is feeling a hell of a lot closer now, after the nominees for the 88th Academy Awards were announced this week. 

Not surprisingly, ‘The Revenant’, Alejandro G. Iñårritu’s critically-acclaimed follow-up to his Best Picture win of last year (Birdman), leads the way with 12 nominations. The Academy also pleased film fans everywhere with a surprising 10 nominations for everyone’s favourite action film, ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’.

As usual, there’s plenty of controversy and public outcry, with scripts from Quentin Tarantino (The Hateful Eight) and Aaron Sorkin (Steve Jobs) snubbed, and an apparent lack of diversity still plaguing the awards show. 

Will Leo finally win the Oscar? Can Iñårritu win back-to-back director gongs? Or will George Miller and his brainchild ‘Mad Max’ steal the show? Here’s all the nominees, plus a few predictions as to who might win on the night (although, if my earlier predictions of the Best Picture nominees are anything to go by, I wouldn’t pay much attention to my guesses).


BEST PICTURE
The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant (our winner)
Room
Spotlight

BEST ACTOR
Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Matt Damon, The Martian
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant (our winner)
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

BEST ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room (our winner)
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Christian Bale, The Big Short
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies (our winner)
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Rooney Mara, Carol (our winner)
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

DIRECTING
Adam McKay – The Big Short
George Miller – Mad Max: Fury Road (our winner)
Alejandro G. Iñårritu – The Revenant
Lenny Abrahamson – Room
Tom McCarthy – Spotlight

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Anomalisa (our winner)
Boy and the World
Inside Out
Shaun the Sheep Movie
When Marnie Was There

COSTUME DESIGN
Carol (our winner)
Cinderella
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire

DOCUMENTARY SHORT
Body Team
Chau, Beyond the Lines
Claude Lanzmann
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Last Day of Freedom

MAKEUP AND HAIR STYLING
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared
The Revenant

ORIGINAL SONG
“Earned It” – Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray” – Racing Extinction
“Simple Song #3” – Youth
“Til It Happens to You” – The Hunting Ground
“Writing’s on the Wall” – Spectre

ANIMATED SHORT
Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live Without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow (our winner)

SOUND EDITING
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens (our winner)
The Martian
The Revenant

FILM EDITING
The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant (our winner)
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Embrace of the Serpent
Mustang
Son of Saul (our winner)
Theeb
A War

ORIGINAL SCORE
Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Sicario (our winner)
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Bridge of Spies
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian (our winner)
The Revenant

VISUAL EFFECTS
Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens (our winner)

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
The Big Short
Brooklyn
Carol
The Martian (our winner)
Room

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Bridge of Spies
Ex Machina (our winner)
Inside Out
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Sicario (our winner)

The JumpCut UK Film Awards 2015: The Nominees

After weeks of agonising over the films of 2015, our esteemed panel have finally submitted their picks for the first annual JumpCut UK Film Awards. The votes have been counted and the nominees are…


actors
Best Support Actress
Alicia Vikander (Ex Machina)
Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs)
Kristen Stewart (Clouds Of Sils Maria)
Marion Cotillard (Macbeth)
Rooney Mara (Carol)
Best Support Actor
Benicio del Toro (Sicario)
Idris Elba (Beasts Of No Nation)
JK Simmons (Whiplash)
Oscar Isaac (Ex Machina)
Paul Dano (Love & Mercy)
Best Lead Actress
Cate Blanchett (Carol)
Charlize Theron (Mad Max: Fury Road)
Emily Blunt (Sicario)
Olivia Cooke (Me And Earl And The Dying Girl)
Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn)
Best Lead Actor
Abraham Attah (Beasts Of No Nation)
Jason Segel (The End Of The Tour)
Matt Damon (The Martian)
Michael Fassbender (Steve Jobs)
Miles Teller (Whiplash)
Best Breakthrough Actor/Actress
Abraham Attah
Alicia Vikander
Daisy Ridley
O’Shea Jackson Jr
Taron Egerton
Worst Acting Performance
Adam Sandler (Pixels)
Jai Courtney (Terminator Genisys)
Jamie Dornan (Fifty Shades Of Grey)
Johnny Depp (Mortdecai)
Vincent D’Onofrio (Jurassic World)

 

technical

Best Director
Alex Garland (Ex Machina)
Damien Chazelle (Whiplash)
Denis Villeneuve (Sicario)
George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road)
Ridley Scott (The Martian)
Best Original Story
Ex Machina
Inside Out
The Gift
The Lobster
Whiplash
Best Adaptation
American Sniper
Macbeth
Me And Earl And The Dying Girl
Steve Jobs
The Martian
Best Cinematography
American Sniper
Macbeth
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
The Martian

 

Best Editing
Birdman
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Whiplash
Best Soundtrack/Score
Dope
Inside Out
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
Whiplash
Best Visual Effects
Ex Machina
Jurassic World
Mad Max: Fury Road
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
The Martian

genre

Best Action Film
American Sniper
Avengers: Age Of Ultron
Kingsman: The Secret Service
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
Best Comedy Film
Inside Out
Spy
The Lobster
The Night Before
Trainwreck
Best Drama Film
Carol
Me And Earl And The Dying Girl
Straight Outta Compton
Whiplash
White God
Best Horror Film
Crimson Peak
Insidious: Chapter 3
It Follows
The Gift
Best Sci-Fi Film
Ex Machina
Jurassic World
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
The Martian

 

Best Documentary, Foreign, Indie or Short Film
Cobain: Montage Of Heck
The End Of The Tour
Kung Fury
The Lobster
World Of Tomorrow
Worst Sequel/Reboot
Fantastic Four
Hot Tub Time Machine 2
Taken 3
Terminator Genisys
Vacation
Worst Film
Hot Tub Time Machine 2
Pan
Paul Blart 2
Pixels
Vacation
Best Film
Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
Sicario
The Martian
Whiplash

miscellaneous

The “Guilty Pleasure” Award
American Ultra
Focus
San Andreas
Ted 2
The Interview

 

 

 

 



So there you have it – 24 categories with lots of films and individuals to celebrate. We will be opening up the voting to the public for the following categories: Best Breakthrough Actor/Actress, Worst Film and Best Trailer, and you can cast your vote here (voting closes 31st December). The rest of the categories will be decided by the JumpCut UK team, our official partners and a handful of expert guests, with all the winners announced on our special YouTube Awards Show at the end of January. 

Golden Globes 2016 Nominees Announced

The Oscars may be the biggest awards event of the year (after the JumpCut UK Film Awards of course), but The Golden Globes are pretty big too, and can often be used as an indicator of what films might be successful with The Academy. Earlier this week, the nominations for the 73rd Golden Globe Awards were announced, with Todd Haynes’ ‘Carol’ leading the way. You can see all the nominations here, and my attempts to predict the winners.

Best Motion Picture (drama): Carol, Mad Max: Fury Road, The Revenant, Room, Spotlight
Prediction: Carol

Best Motion Picture (comedy/musical): The Big Short, Joy, The Martian, Spy, Trainwreck
Prediction: The Martian

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture (drama): Cate Blanchett (Carol), Brie Larson (Room), Rooney Mara (Carol), Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn), Alicia Vikander (The Danish Girl)
Prediction: Brie Larson

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture (drama): Bryan Cranston (Trumbo), Leonardo DiCaprio (The Revenant), Michael Fassbender (Steve Jobs), Eddie Redmayne (The Danish Girl), Will Smith (Concussion)
Prediction: Leonardo DiCapro

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture (comedy/musical): Jennifer Lawrence (Joy), Melissa McCarthy (Spy), Amy Schumer (Trainwreck), Maggie Smith (Lady In The Van), Lily Tomlin (Grandma)
Prediction: Jennifer Lawrence

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture (comedy/musical): Christian Bale (The Big Short), Mark Ruffalo (Infinitely Polar Bear), Steve Carell (The Big Short), Matt Damon (The Martian), Al Pacino (Danny Collins)
Prediction: Matt Damon

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture: Jane Fonda (Youth), Alicia Vikander (Ex Machina), Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight), Helen Mirren (Trumbo), Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs)
Prediction: Alicia Vikander

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture: Sylvester Stallone (Creed), Idris Elba (Beasts Of No Nation), Paul Dano (Love & Mercy), Mark Rylance (Bridge Of Spies), Michael Shannon (99 Homes)
Prediction: Michael Shannon

Best Director: Todd Haynes (Carol), Alejandro G. Inarritu (The Revenant), George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road), Ridley Scott (The Martian), Tom McCarthy (Spotlight)
Prediction: Todd Haynes

Best Screenplay: Emma Donoghue (Room), Tom McCarthy/Josh Singer (Spotlight), Aaron Sorkin (Steve Jobs), Charles Randolph/Adam McKay (The Big Short), Quentin Tarantino (The Hateful Eight)
Prediction: Aaron Sorkin

Best Animated Feature Film: Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur, Anomalisa, Shaun The Sheep Movie, The Peanuts Movie
Prediction: Anomalisa

Best Foreign Language Film: The Club, The Fencer, Mustang, The Brand New Testament, Son Of Saul
Prediction: Son Of Saul

Best Original Score: Carol, The Revenant, Steve Jobs, The Danish Girl, The Hateful Eight
Prediction: The Revenant

What are your thoughts on the nominations and my predictions? Let us know who you think the big winners will be at The Golden Globes in 2016. You don’t have to wait long to find out where the awards end up, with the ceremony taking place on January 10th 2016.

Written by Jakob Lewis Barnes

Watch This Space: November 2 – 8

Welcome to your weekly go-to film guide – WatchThisSpace – where we recommend what to watch in the cinema and on the television, and remind you of those brilliant films hiding in your DVD collection.

IN THE CINEMA

Very much in the spirit of last year’s ‘Chef’, ‘Burnt’ features a talented cast including Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Alicia Vikander, Uma Thurman, Lily James, and Emma Thompson. Cooper leads as a famous chef who destroys his career through drug addiction and outlandish behavior, now looking to redeem himself by returning to London and taking over a new restaurant. Murmurs from the US box-office so far suggest this one may well be more TV dinner than haute cuisine, so this drama is very much an acquired taste.

Directed by John Crowley and starring Saoirse Ronan, ‘Brooklyn’ tells the story of a young woman in the 1960s who leaves Ireland for New York, where she falls in love. ‘Brooklyn’ is attracting a degree of awards hype, especially surrounding Ronan’s performance, and for those seeking a small but sweet drama this awards season, this could be the film for you.

 

ON THE TV

Tuesday 22:00 GMT: A film which may not be for everyone, the super dark and hyper-stylised ‘Sin City’ plays on SyFy this Tuesday night. With unpleasant characters and situations throughout, as three characters explore the violence and corruption of their city, this beautifully crafted film is well worth a watch if you enjoy twisted, powerful projects. Check out the JumpCut UK review here.

Wednesday 21:00 GMT: A down and out college a capella group gets new members this Wednesday on Film4 with ‘Pitch Perfect’. This group of misfits, including the talented Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson and Brittany Snow, surge to the top and face their inner school rivals, in the first installment of this catchy, musical series which has developed something of a cult following since its release in 2012.

Friday 21:00 GMT: Who doesn’t enjoy seeing Angelina Jolie kick butt and take names? Catch ‘Salt’ on E4 for a film full of tension, fun and action sequences that will wet your appetite as we lead up to an action-packed November.

Saturday 21:00 GMT: Your Saturday night is sorted, with ITV4 bringing you a real American classic in the shape of ‘Tremors’. A diverse cast of characters come together to survive in small town USA, with star turns from Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward, as carnivorous, subterranean worms terrorise the countryside. With a brilliant mix of horror and comedy, this should be a fun watch!

Sunday 21:00 GMT: Rian Johnson’s ‘Looper’ is arguably one of best time-travel, sci-fi movies of this decade so far. The film supplants us in a fascinating world full of mystery, action and dialogue that is fascinating from beginning to end, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis delivering a wonderful chemistry. Don’t lose track of time this Sunday, switch to BBC2 for this intriguing flick.

DIG IT OUT

This is our favourite part of the WatchThisSpace section. We delve into our own DVD collection and pick out some amazing films, that may not instantly spring to mind when you’re stuck for inspiration to make your movie night a success. Maybe you’ve never seen a film that we pick – or even heard of them for that matter – but you’re gonna have to trust us on this one, and Dig It Out.

Grand Hotel (1932): A film which takes place in a lavish hotel, with a number of eccentric characters who all have some sort of drama going on in their lives, and all of these characters will have to deal with their issues together as they find themselves living in the same restrictive quarters. Many films have been inspired by the premise of this film, but few do it better. The charm of this film is in large part thanks to its ensemble cast, where many of the biggest movie stars of the early 1930’s appear, including Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Greta Garbo and Wallace Beery. For director Edmund Goulding, it is considered by many to be his finest film. AG

Locke: One of the best films of 2014, ‘Locke’ features just one man – the incredible Tom Hardy. As the titular character, Hardy’s Ivan Locke is a man doing something a lot of us actually fail to do; owning our mistakes. This film is thematically very heavy, exploring themes that should make us all think about and consider our day to day lives. The entire film may take place solely in a car, with just Hardy on screen, yet it is a riveting watch from beginning to end. Check out the JumpCut UK review here. JD

The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre (1948): Three men in search of wealth search the Sierra Madre mountains for gold, but along the way they run into adventure, joy, sorrow, greed, and betrayal. A movie directed and partially written (screenplay) by John Huston, this film stars one of my all-time favorite actors in Humphrey Bogart. For me, Bogart was the greatest A-list star of his generation; his acting alone elevates this movie above and beyond others in the genre. It has this western feel to it, even before westerns became all the rage. With wonderful cinematography, a great cast, a well-written script full of philosophical concepts and great directing, you would be hard pressed to find a better action-adventure film out there than this one. AG

When Marnie Was There: This is considered Studio Ghibli’s last film, and if so, what a note to go out on. This film tells the tale of a young girl named Anna who is lonely and depressed, when she goes away for the summer and meets another young girl named Marnie. The two develop a striking friendship that becomes more and more layered as the film goes on, producing a sweet and beautiful experience which I would highly recommend. JD 

This week’s WatchThisSpace was compiled by Andrew Garrison and special guest JD Duran of InSession Film.