‘Maturing Youth’ World Premiere Photos & Interviews (EXCLUSIVE)

Earlier this year we were offered the opportunity to review R&F Entertainment’s upcoming short film, Maturing Youth. Since publishing our review we’ve also had the wonderful opportunity to interview the film’s lead Award-nominated lead, Sean A Kaufman, and its director, Divoni Simon. Now, we’re pleased to exclusively share with you some photos and interviews from the film’s world premiere, which was held October 21st, 2018 in New York City.

At the event, R&F Entertainment hosted sit down interviews with the stars of the film to chat about their career, dreams, and inspirations. Following the award ceremony at the film festival, the stars had individual standing interviews on the red carpet with TV host and interviewer, Award-nominated actress, producer, director, author, and entrepreneur Janet Miranda. Below you’ll find the red carpet interview with award-winning actress Darleen Fontaine and Rae’l Ba, where they discuss their characters in the film and working on the film. 


The event had over 120 attendees from family, friends, crew members, and the general public. Individuals attending the event flew in as far as Florida and the west coast. Some even travelled over 20 hours by vehicle to attend. The screening room was filled to capacity and was sold out.

The screening opened with a round of applause once the films production company’s logo [R&F Entertainment] appeared right at the start. Once the ending credits came up, a second round of applause roared through the screening room. The audience laughed and enjoyed the special bloopers during the end credits and finally had a standing ovation at its completion. Following the first world screening of the film, the cast and director were on stage during an exclusive Q&A with the audience.

cast crew producer director

L2R: Michael Paladine (VO Artist), Chase Michael Palante (Award Winning Producer), Rae’l Ba, Kim Paris (Nominated for Best Actress), Sean A Kaufman (Nominated for Best Actor), Brian Austin Padua (Assistant Script Supervisor), Divoni Simon (Nominated for Best Director), Darleen Rae Fontine (Won Best Supporting Actress), Terrence Keene (Nominated for Best Supporting Actor), Joshua St. Leger, Albee Castro – Photo Credit: R&F Entertainment

Maturing Youth was nominated for Best Film, Divoni Simon was nominated for Best Director, Sean A Kaufman was nominated for Best Actor, Kim Paris was nominated for Best Actress, Terrence Keene was nominated for Best Supporting Actor, and Darleen Rae Fontaine was nominated and won Best Supporting Actress. A total of 6 nominations and 1 win.

Each cast member had their own specific time slots for Facebook Live and Instagram Live recordings at the event. Each of their individual recordings can be found on their individual Facebook and Instagram pages.

R&F Entertainment went live on the films official social media pages, Facebook and Instagram, for the win of Darleen Rae Fontaine’s award for her performance in the film. Her speech can be found directly on Maturing Youth’s Facebook page.

Below you’ll see the glamorous cast and crew on the red carpet at the film’s premiere.

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All Photo Credit: R&F Entertainment

 

The film is currently going through the New York Film Festival circuits before making its Los Angeles premiere in Spring 2019. The film will make it overseas to its international film festival run in 2020, with a projected distribution deal to release the film to the public by the holidays in 2020. We’ll be sure to keep you up-to-date with the film’s festival run.

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Production Begins On Short Film ‘Aftermath’

The cameras have started rolling on JUMPCUT PRODUCTIONS latest short film, titled ‘Aftermath’.

The film will see Oscar Barnes make his directorial debut, with a screenplay written by Jakob Lewis Barnes. Both will also star in this gritty crime thriller set for release later this year.

“Loyalties are tested when a robbery goes wrong and two part-time criminals find themselves way in over their heads.”

Siena Oberman: Making Waves

Interview by Jakob Lewis Barnes

We always strive to support the women in film movement here at JumpCut UK, by highlighting the outstanding women making waves in the industry. Our focus here is Siena Oberman; a producer hailing from Los Angeles, a woman on a mission, hoping to inspire and effect change whilst telling the stories that matter. Her latest short film ‘Iconoclast’ just got accepted into Cannes 2017, and she’s got plenty more where that came from. 


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Conscientia: Poster and Details Released

Whilst you’ve all (hopefully) been enjoying our latest short film ‘Harlequin’, our filmmaking team has been working hard behind the scenes developing our next project. Now, we can tell you a few things about our upcoming short film, titled ‘Conscientia’.

‘Conscientia’ is a short, mysterious, horror film, which will see Nick Deal make his directorial debut, as well as Jakob Lewis Barnes making his acting debut, alongside Hannah Thomas. Nick and Jakob wrote the screenplay for this film, afConscientiater collaborating with Naim David to develop a story. The film will also see JumpCut UK Productions join forces with Felix Mater Society once again, after a successful collaboration on ‘Harlequin’.

Synopsis: As Samuel once again struggles with his inability to sleep, his grasp on reality is challenged when the events of a single night lead him to question his own morality.

If that wasn’t enough to get your tongues wagging, we’ve also got this wicked poster for ‘Conscientia’, courtesy of our Art Director, Oscar Barnes. Filming begins on 19th February 2017. Release date TBC.

Oliver Park: The Future Of The Horror Genre

Interview by Jakob Lewis Barnes

The horror genre is a tricky place to make your name, but Oliver Park is an up-and-coming director taking the independent film scene by storm. Stepping behind the camera, after making his name as an actor, the future is bright for Oliver Park, with his short film ‘Vicious’ enjoying success on the festival circuit, and upcoming short ‘Still’ set to do the same. We caught up with Oliver to speak horror, filmmaking and the future.

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Harlequin: An Update

If you follow us on Twitter (you’d be mad not to), you may have noticed that our latest short film ‘Harlequin’ is complete, which is very exciting. The short film, directed by Jakob Lewis Barnes and starring Kenton Hall (A Dozen Summers), is a dark drama about a clown who reaches his breaking point – very appropriate with the recent outbreak of crazy clowns on the streets. That’s nothing to do with us though, promise.

The film has been sent as a private screener to a select few, for advanced reviews, and the response so far has been overwhelmingly positive. Please take a moment to check out these reviews from these lovely people:

Moving forward, ‘Harlequin’ is now in the hands of its executive producer over at Felix Mater Society, who is navigating the minefield that is festival submission. Due to this, we are currently unable to nail down a general release date, but rest assured, we will bombard you all with the link to watch the finished article once it’s up on YouTube. You can watch the trailer here in the meantime (please do). Thanks to everyone who has supported this project so far.

Kenton Hall: One Year Later

Interview by Jakob Lewis Barnes

Around this time last year, I had the pleasure of interviewing the writer/director/star of indie flick ‘A Dozen Summers’, Kenton Hall. In the year since that interview, Kenton Hall has seen his little independent film go from strength to strength – achieving festival circuit success and fighting a certain merc-with-a-mouth in the DVD charts. Coincidentally, I’ve also been lucky enough to work with the man himself on my upcoming short film ‘Harlequin’. So, I thought now would be the perfect time to ask Kenton some questions about his whirlwind of a year.


JLB: So, you’re pretty busy right now with the DVD release of ‘A Dozen Summers’ – how are you finding that particular rollercoaster?

KH: Exhausting? It’s been strange; Two years of hard slog and emotional turmoil. (Take note, young filmmakers, this game is not for the faint of heart.) I can’t pretend it’s not exciting to see my film on shelves – a physical item that people can take home – but I think rollercoaster is a pretty good word to describe it. In a way, the hard work has only just begun, because now we have a shot at a much larger audience and we need to let people know we’re there, and then march them to the till, or to press the button online. But I’m super proud of what our team accomplished. It was – as far as we can figure out – actually impossible. But there it is, all shiny and shrink-wrapped.

JLB: I remember you were chasing ‘Deadpool’ hard in the pre-order charts – did you end up beating that son of a bitch?

KH: You mean the OTHER part-Canadian fourth-wall-breaking movie? I’m afraid Mr. Reynolds and friends JUST held us off the top spot on Zavvi’s chart, but we snagged it as soon as ‘Deadpool’ was released into the wild. So, yeah, we got number 1 on the Zavvi DVD pre-order chart. That was…odd, but cool. I won’t pretend it wasn’t cool. Especially for a little film like ours, which probably cost about the same as Ryan Reynold’s assistant’s snack budget.

JLB: ‘A Dozen Summers’ has proved to be hugely popular and pretty successful – what kind of doors has this film open for you?

KH: Well, I’m going to stop you there. I want it to be made very clear that I didn’t say it’s been “hugely popular and pretty successful”, because that would make me insufferable. It’s great that it’s meant something to people though – and, hey, we’re human, we love to feel loved. And there have been some people that have not enjoyed it, which is their prerogative. But, overall, I think people “got” what we were trying to do, which was to make something a bit different, a film which had a little something for everybody, be they 12 years old or 12 at heart – and that’s a huge demographic, so it is a big ask. Those people who loved it, really loved it though – and it is films that did that to me when I was younger that started me on this path in the first place, so I can’t complain.

In terms of doors, I’m trying to stick my foot into a few that have opened a crack. There are a lot of stories I want to tell, and one or two that other people want me to help them tell. I don’t want to jinx anything. Genuinely, a lot depends on what happens over the next couple of weeks – an official chart placing would be useful. (Hint, hint, people. The next seven days are the time to give “A Dozen Summers” a shot. I’ll be ever so grateful. There may be dancing.)

JLB: Well, we all want to see Kenton dance, of course. Now, I’m going to be very selfish and veer the conversation towards ‘Harlequin’ for a while – how did you find that whole experience?

KH: Well, other than the fact that a lot of people I love are frightened to death by clowns, and therefore will probably never speak to me again, it was great to get back in front of a camera and do something different. And I love working with people like yourselves who are just trying to make something unique. Plus, short film is a real love of mine. Our producer on ‘A Dozen Summers’, Alexzandra Jackson, is the director of a film festival called The Short Cinema, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year and therefore I’m going to plug the hell out of it – it takes place in Leicester from August 24th to 27th and you can get tickets here. I expect to see you all there, having also bought ‘A Dozen Summers’ and being geared up for ‘Harlequin’.

JLB: Have you managed to get all the clown make up off yet? You really threw yourself into that character (which made my job a lot easier) – what was your process/preparation for becoming Charles the clown?

KH: I do bathe, you know. Although there is a tricky spot in the middle of my back. No, I’m back to what passes for normal in my universe now. 

It’s very kind of you to say such nice things about my performance. Preparation? Like most actors, I have what might charitably be referred to as a fluid relationship with reality. There’s more of me around than there used to be – perils of being responsible for small humans – but it’s still relaxing to cast yourself off and slip into someone more comfortable for a while. Now I know, in this instance, that you wouldn’t think my character screamed “comfort”, but it’s an exorcism, of sorts. I may never have been exactly in Charles’ oversized shoes, but playing someone who is struggling with his identity, with his need for and abandonment by an audience? Hell, son, I’ve been preparing for that part for my entire life. Also, I like being made-up, so that was a win.

JLB: And we got your delightful daughters in on the act too, to play a couple of unimpressed audience members – do you enjoy working with the girls?

KH: At the risk of appearing sentimental, I would work with them all day, every day; I love their company. They can be challenging, but that’s kind of the beauty of those two. I like to see them grasp the idea that hard work brings rewards. Plus, they’re genuinely funny and genuinely kind, so it’s a pleasure. I’m proud of them, because they care about the world and they’re paying attention. That’s all any parent can ask.

I’m also counting on, if they do insist on remaining in the arts, them repaying me with work in my dotage, when my looks – such as they are – have faded and I’ve been reduced to making commercials for stair-lifts.

JLB: We’ve said it before but the success of your film really is quite inspiring for indie filmmakers – what role in the landscape of cinema do you think indie film plays?

KH: If we inspire anybody, that’s good news. Independent film is the lifeblood of the film industry. Low budgets mean having to concentrate on script and character to make a film work; You can’t hide behind spectacle. Production value, we all aspire to; Emotional value, however, is essential. Our film is flawed, and a lot of indie films are, technically, flawed. But what you’re seeing, in most cases, is an unvarnished view of the soul of the writer and/or director, and the result of the love and talent of a large group of people who couldn’t have been doing it for the money, because there wasn’t any. How can that not make it one of the most important threads in the filmmaking tapestry? Other opinions are available, but I’d have to hear a hell of an opposing argument before I stood down.

It is, however, up to all of us to make it work. Distributors, broadcasters and exhibitors need to take more chances, sure, but why should they, if we as an audience don’t? How can they make their living? We need to watch more indie films and talk about more indie films before we get to make more indie films.

(P.S. Did I mention that ‘A Dozen Summers’ is available now, wherever DVDs are sold? I did? Alright, then.)

JLB: And finally, where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

KH: I have a picture in my head that puts a smile on my face, let’s just leave it at that. 


You can order your copy of the brilliant ‘A Dozen Summers’ here (and we really urge you to do so – our praise can even be found on the DVD cover). And if you’re itching to see what Kenton is up to next, check out the teaser trailer for our short film ‘Harlequin’ here.

Harlequin’s Leading Man

Our next filmmaking venture – the short film titled ‘Harlequin’ – has found its star. We are delighted to announce that Kenton Hall, who you may recognise from the brilliant indie flick ‘A Dozen Summers’ (a film which Kenton also directed), will play the lead role in ‘Harlequin’.

With the film being something of a one-man-show, all eyes will be on Kenton Hall and his portrayal of a troubled clown. Personally, we think Kenton will be perfect for the role (not that we think he’s a clown or anything), and we’re very excited to work with such a talented performer. 

Harlequin Gets An Executive Producer

We are delighted to announce that Felix Mater Society will be acting as Executive Producer on our next short film – ‘Harlequin’. After discussing the project with the head of Felix Mater, an agreement has been put in place and the company have really got behind us on this one. Isn’t it great when you connect with people who share the same vision as you?

The short film – written and directed by Jakob Lewis Barnes – is set to begin filming in May 2016. Look out for more details in the near future and please, continue to support indie film!