Decade Definers: 1980s – Goonies, Gremlins and Ghostbusters: The Golden Age of the Family-Friendly Film

Written by Fiona Underhill

Full disclosure: I was born in 1980 and therefore obviously the 1980s WAS my childhood. So, I am biased when I say that the 1980s was a golden age for the family-friendly live-action film. However, I stand by it (and I’m about to show you the receipts). The 1980s were NOT a golden age for animation (which was reignited by Disney with ‘The Little Mermaid’ in 1989), but sci-fi and fantasy live-action films aimed at and featuring children, which the whole family could enjoy, were numerous and of a great quality. From epic fairytale fantasies, to aliens, robots and spaceships, to creatures on earth, to the dawn of the fear of computers and technology – there was something to bring everyone to their local smoke-filled flea pit. We didn’t get a VHS player until around 1992, so the only options were to watch a film if it happened to come up on one of the 4 TV channels (and walk to the TV to switch between those channels), or to go to our town’s one single-screen cinema. It is so bizarre now to think back on the cinema having smoking ‘sections’ (as if the smoke wouldn’t permeate the whole room) and that was how we watched films then – through a haze. The amount of choice on offer nowadays is preferable of course, but has it really improved the quality of what is on offer to children? I would argue that family films have never bettered their 1980s hey day. So, strap yourselves in for a journey back to the golden age…

Decade Defining Directors: Dante, Henson/Oz, Howard, Gilliam, Reiner & Reitman

Decade Defining Actors: Tom Hanks, Rick Moranis, Martin Short

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Master of Puppets: Fairytale-style Fantasies

Flash Gordon (Hodges, 1980)
Time Bandits (Gilliam, 1981)
The Dark Crystal (Henson & Oz, 1982)
The NeverEnding Story (Peterson, 1984)
Return to Oz (Murch, 1985)
Labyrinth (Henson, 1986)
The Princess Bride (Reiner, 1987)
Willow (Howard, 1988)
The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (Gilliam, 1988)

This sub-genre was dominated by one man: Jim Henson. The man behind ‘The Muppets’ and ‘Sesame Street’ not only directed some stand-out films of the 80s, but had his hand (literally) in many more. The Jim Henson Company’s puppets and creatures were a defining feature of the decade and something that I have the hugest feelings of nostalgia and affection for. From NeverEnding Story’s Falkor the Luckdragon to Labyrinth’s Ludo and Hoggle; these characters were infused with such tender emotion by Henson and given fully realised character arcs and relationships with humans. It is extremely hard for me to choose, but if I had to pick just one ‘desert-island’ film of the 1980s, it would be ‘Labyrinth’. A tense and scary story, amazing creature design and David Bowie – what more could you ask for? But this sub-genre is ripe with absolute classics – ‘The Princess Bride’ is a hilarious twist on the classic fairytale with unforgettable characters such as Inigo Montoya, the giant Fezzik and Prince Humperdinck. ‘The NeverEnding Story’ shows a real-world boy, Bastian following the fantastical adventures of Atreyu and his trusty horse Artax as they battle to save the childlike Empress. ‘Return to Oz’ still haunts my nightmares with its ‘Hall of Heads’ and the terrifying wheelers. However, it has some delightfully affectionate creatures such as Tik-Tok, Billina, Jack Pumpkinhead and Gump. ‘Flash Gordon’ came from the same love of 1940s comics and serials that inspired both ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Indiana Jones’. It is an epic that traverses space, involves good vs evil and Brian Blessed. I do not know what else to tell you.

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A Tribe Called Quest: Adventures Run Amok

Romancing the Stone (Zemeckis, 1984)
The Jewel of the Nile (Teague, 1985)
The Goonies (Donner, 1985)
Three Amigos! (Landis, 1986)
Twins (Reitman, 1988)

The quest, the journey, the mystery, the adventure – these are tropes as old as time and ones fully exploited during the 1980s. ‘The Goonies’ is a beloved classic and involves a gang of kids finding a pirate treasure map and going on an exciting quest. ‘Three Amigos’ features SNL alum Chevy Chase, Steve Martin and Martin Short as three actors who become embroiled in a real-life battle of life and death in Mexico. ‘Romancing’ and ‘Jewel’ aren’t really aimed at children, but are PG-rated and make good companion pieces to ‘Indiana Jones’. They have a similar storyline to ‘Three Amigos’, where those writing adventure stories become involved in an adventure of their own. ‘Twins’ is the story of Arnold Schwarzenegger discovering he has a twin brother; obviously played by Danny DeVito and their quest to discover more about their parents.

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Creature Features: Aliens, Robots, Monsters and Magic

ET: the Extra-Terrestrial (Spielberg, 1982)
Gremlins (Dante, 1984)
Gremlins 2 (Dante, 1990)
Starman (Carpenter, 1984)
The Karate Kid Trilogy (Avildson, 1984-1989)
Ghostbusters (Reitman, 1984)
Ghostbusters 2 (Reitman, 1989)
Teen Wolf (Daniel, 1985)
Teen Wolf Too (Leitch, 1987)
Little Shop of Horrors (Oz, 1986)
The Worst Witch (Young, 1986)
Short Circuit (Badham, 1986)
Short Circuit 2 (Johnson, 1988)
Batteries Not Included (Robbins, 1987)
Harry & The Hendersons (Dear, 1987)
Mannequin (Gottlieb, 1987)
Vice Versa (Gilbert, 1988)
Tremors (Underwood, 1990)

A rich history of aliens and robots visiting earth was mined with aplomb during the 80s; from the love-story (featuring a young and hot Jeff Bridges) ‘Starman’, to alien-robots in ‘Batteries Not Included’, to the classic ‘ET’ – this sub-genre offered plenty. The key was that the human story that surrounded these creatures was taken seriously and delivered with emotion, from the older people battling large corporations and dealing with Alzheimer’s in ‘Batteries’ to the single mother struggling with three kids in ‘ET’ (a story I could strongly identify with, as the Gertie of my single-parent family). Pretty much every creature you can think of got its own feature in the 80s; the mermaid in ‘Splash’ (which I’ll talk about later), werewolves in ‘Teen Wolf’ and ‘American Werewolf’, Big Foot in ‘Harry & the Hendersons’, ghosts in ‘Ghostbusters’ and ‘Beetlejuice’ and vampires in the not-quite family-friendly ‘Lost Boys’. More unusual creatures came in the form of giant underground worms in ‘Tremors’, the mysterious mogwai from the Far East in ‘Gremlins’ and the man-eating plant in 1950s-set musical ‘Little Shop of Horrors’. A home-grown robot came in the form of ‘Short Circuit’s’ Jonny 5 who befriended the beautiful Stephanie and if I were pushed, this is perhaps my favourite from this section. ‘Magic’ was introduced in a rare British entry to the 80s family film; ‘The Worst Witch’, via an ancient Egyptian inhabiting a department store mannequin and a mysterious Tibetan skull causing a father and son to swap bodies in ‘Vice Versa’. Whilst not featuring any magic, ‘The Karate Kid’ trilogy continued the fascination with cultures considered ‘exotic’ at the time and along with the cartoon ‘Hong Kong Phooey’, certainly increased interest and participation in the martial arts. It should be noted how many sequels feature in this sub-genre (perhaps demonstrating they are not a new phenomenon destroying film, as some would have you believe) and I’m going to do a shout-out here for unfairly maligned ‘Ghostbusters 2’.

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Fear of the Computer Age: Spaceships and Tech Going Awry 

War Games (Badham, 1983)
Explorers (Dante, 1985)
Flight of the Navigator (Kleiser, 1986)
Space Camp (Winer, 1986)
Innerspace (Dante, 1987)
Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (Herek, 1989)
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (Johnston, 1989)

Considering the 1980s signalled the dawn of affordable personal computers and games consoles (I can remember our Amstrad and Atari with fondness), cinema actually started addressing the perceived dangers of computer technology very early on. ‘War Games’ is an unbelievably prescient and ahead-of-its-time film about a teenage Matthew Broderick thinking he is playing a computer game but actually accidentally hacking into a super-computer which controls the US military arsenal and almost starting WWIII. ‘War Games’ also managed to utilise fear of the Cold War, which very much dominated the decade, with the Russians as the perpetual villains. Of course, these films reflected a real fear and caution about what was such a new technology at the time. ‘Explorers’, ‘Flight of the Navigator’ and ‘Space Camp’ all feature children accidentally setting off in alien spaceships or earth-made rockets and their ensuing adventures. All three feature young actors who went on to adult success; including Ethan Hawke (Explorers), Sarah Jessica Parker (FOTN) and Joaquin Phoenix (who went by the name Leaf in ‘Space Camp’). ‘Innerspace’ has (a very young and hot) Dennis Quaid as a pilot, who is taking part in miniaturization experiment, being accidentally injected into the body of Martin Short. Miniaturization is also the theme of ‘Honey, I Shrunk the Kids’, which features that other most 80s of actors Rick Moranis. ‘Bill & Ted’s’ problem is less a spaceship and more time machine – which takes two very dumb surfer dude teens through history and ends up helping them ace the subject at school. In my humble opinion, 1991’s ‘Bogus Journey’ is even better.

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King of the 80s: Tom Hanks

Splash (Howard, 1984)
The Money Pit (Benjamin, 1986)
Dragnet (Mankiewicz, 1987)
Big (Marshall, 1988)
Turner & Hooch (Spottiswoode, 1989)
The Burbs (Dante, 1989)
Joe Versus the Volcano (Shanley, 1990)

Many of you will associate Hanks with his oscar-winning roles and Spielberg collaborations. I, however, will always think of the young, curly-haired actor who benevolently guided me through my childhood by starring in one stone-cold classic after another. Hanks began the 80s with the R-rated comedy Bachelor Party, but after that, he starred in the greatest run of family-friendly fare of any actor. Not to get too serious or maudlin on you, but my father died in a car accident in 1983 and I genuinely feel like Tom Hanks played a part in raising me. Starting with ‘Splash’, in which he falls in love with a mermaid and moving onto ‘Big’, in which the mysterious animatronic fortune-teller Zoltar causes Josh Baskin to become ‘big’ overnight – Hanks’ endearing everyman persona sold the emotion in these films. Hanks is also great at playing frustrated and thwarted by circumstance, in ‘Money Pit’, where a dilapidated house drives him crazy, in ‘Turner & Hooch’, where he plays an uptight cop teamed with a very messy and stinky mutt and in ‘The Burbs’, where he becomes obsessed with his neighbours who he believes are part of a satanic cult. Satanic cults were obviously dime-a-dozen during the 80s, because they also crop up in ‘Dragnet’, where he again plays a cop, this time partnered with Dan Akroyd instead of a large mastiff. Ritual sacrifices are ALSO a feature of ‘Joe Versus the Volcano’ (yes, I’m cheating by taking us to 1990, but there’s no way I was leaving this out). This is by far the best Hanks team-up with Meg Ryan and is, well, there is no other way of putting it, bat-shit crazy.

 

So; there you have it. Chances are, if you’re reading this, you grew up the 1980s as I did and are familiar with most of these films. You will have your personal favourites (please comment on social media with yours!) and will view the decade with similarly rose-tinted glasses to me. However, if you’re a ‘yoof’, I encourage you to dive into this decade and discover these gems for yourself. From epic fantasy fairytales, to science-fiction, creature features, adventurous quests and the ouevre of Tom Hanks – there really is something to appeal to everyone. That was the key to the 80s; films that were suitable for children, that could be enjoyed by the whole family.

My personal Top 12 (couldn’t squeeze it into 10) of 1980s family films:

12) Space Camp
11) Three Amigos!
10) The Princess Bride
9) The Worst Witch
8) batteries not included
7) The Goonies
6) Joe Versus the Volcano
5) Innerspace
4) NeverEnding Story
3) Short Circuit
2) Return to Oz
1) Labyrinth

We have more articles to share for our 80s Decade Definers, including why ‘Back to the Future’ was a game changer and a look at teenage-orientated films, so why not catch up on our previous posts before we share them with you:

The Indiana Jones Trilogy

The Birth of the Action Hero

 

Watch This Space: November 2 – 8

Welcome to your weekly go-to film guide – WatchThisSpace – where we recommend what to watch in the cinema and on the television, and remind you of those brilliant films hiding in your DVD collection.

IN THE CINEMA

Very much in the spirit of last year’s ‘Chef’, ‘Burnt’ features a talented cast including Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Alicia Vikander, Uma Thurman, Lily James, and Emma Thompson. Cooper leads as a famous chef who destroys his career through drug addiction and outlandish behavior, now looking to redeem himself by returning to London and taking over a new restaurant. Murmurs from the US box-office so far suggest this one may well be more TV dinner than haute cuisine, so this drama is very much an acquired taste.

Directed by John Crowley and starring Saoirse Ronan, ‘Brooklyn’ tells the story of a young woman in the 1960s who leaves Ireland for New York, where she falls in love. ‘Brooklyn’ is attracting a degree of awards hype, especially surrounding Ronan’s performance, and for those seeking a small but sweet drama this awards season, this could be the film for you.

 

ON THE TV

Tuesday 22:00 GMT: A film which may not be for everyone, the super dark and hyper-stylised ‘Sin City’ plays on SyFy this Tuesday night. With unpleasant characters and situations throughout, as three characters explore the violence and corruption of their city, this beautifully crafted film is well worth a watch if you enjoy twisted, powerful projects. Check out the JumpCut UK review here.

Wednesday 21:00 GMT: A down and out college a capella group gets new members this Wednesday on Film4 with ‘Pitch Perfect’. This group of misfits, including the talented Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson and Brittany Snow, surge to the top and face their inner school rivals, in the first installment of this catchy, musical series which has developed something of a cult following since its release in 2012.

Friday 21:00 GMT: Who doesn’t enjoy seeing Angelina Jolie kick butt and take names? Catch ‘Salt’ on E4 for a film full of tension, fun and action sequences that will wet your appetite as we lead up to an action-packed November.

Saturday 21:00 GMT: Your Saturday night is sorted, with ITV4 bringing you a real American classic in the shape of ‘Tremors’. A diverse cast of characters come together to survive in small town USA, with star turns from Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward, as carnivorous, subterranean worms terrorise the countryside. With a brilliant mix of horror and comedy, this should be a fun watch!

Sunday 21:00 GMT: Rian Johnson’s ‘Looper’ is arguably one of best time-travel, sci-fi movies of this decade so far. The film supplants us in a fascinating world full of mystery, action and dialogue that is fascinating from beginning to end, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis delivering a wonderful chemistry. Don’t lose track of time this Sunday, switch to BBC2 for this intriguing flick.

DIG IT OUT

This is our favourite part of the WatchThisSpace section. We delve into our own DVD collection and pick out some amazing films, that may not instantly spring to mind when you’re stuck for inspiration to make your movie night a success. Maybe you’ve never seen a film that we pick – or even heard of them for that matter – but you’re gonna have to trust us on this one, and Dig It Out.

Grand Hotel (1932): A film which takes place in a lavish hotel, with a number of eccentric characters who all have some sort of drama going on in their lives, and all of these characters will have to deal with their issues together as they find themselves living in the same restrictive quarters. Many films have been inspired by the premise of this film, but few do it better. The charm of this film is in large part thanks to its ensemble cast, where many of the biggest movie stars of the early 1930’s appear, including Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Greta Garbo and Wallace Beery. For director Edmund Goulding, it is considered by many to be his finest film. AG

Locke: One of the best films of 2014, ‘Locke’ features just one man – the incredible Tom Hardy. As the titular character, Hardy’s Ivan Locke is a man doing something a lot of us actually fail to do; owning our mistakes. This film is thematically very heavy, exploring themes that should make us all think about and consider our day to day lives. The entire film may take place solely in a car, with just Hardy on screen, yet it is a riveting watch from beginning to end. Check out the JumpCut UK review here. JD

The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre (1948): Three men in search of wealth search the Sierra Madre mountains for gold, but along the way they run into adventure, joy, sorrow, greed, and betrayal. A movie directed and partially written (screenplay) by John Huston, this film stars one of my all-time favorite actors in Humphrey Bogart. For me, Bogart was the greatest A-list star of his generation; his acting alone elevates this movie above and beyond others in the genre. It has this western feel to it, even before westerns became all the rage. With wonderful cinematography, a great cast, a well-written script full of philosophical concepts and great directing, you would be hard pressed to find a better action-adventure film out there than this one. AG

When Marnie Was There: This is considered Studio Ghibli’s last film, and if so, what a note to go out on. This film tells the tale of a young girl named Anna who is lonely and depressed, when she goes away for the summer and meets another young girl named Marnie. The two develop a striking friendship that becomes more and more layered as the film goes on, producing a sweet and beautiful experience which I would highly recommend. JD 

This week’s WatchThisSpace was compiled by Andrew Garrison and special guest JD Duran of InSession Film.