INTERVIEW: Morgan Neville

Interviewed by Dave Curtis

Morgan Neville is a well-known documentary filmmaker,  he has made numerous films that focus on music and culture. His latest films include Won’t You Be My Neighbour which is about iconic children’s television host Fred Rogers and They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead which tells the story of Orson Welles and his last film The Other Side of the Wind. Whilst he was at the London Film Festival premiering not one, but two new documentaries we got to sit down with him and ask him a few questions about his love for Fred Rogers, Orson Welles and we get into the process of documentary filmmaking. 


Was this a passion project for you or did somebody come to you?

It was my project, I mean it was a passion project in that I loved Mister Rogers as a boy and then I didn’t think about him for decades but every time he came back in my life as an adult it surprised me somehow. So, it was something as an adult, these viral videos would go by as Fred Rogers in America and they always just struck me as a voice that is missing in the culture. And so, the real instinct to make the film was not a nostalgic instinct. I am not a big fan of nostalgia, it was actually ‘how do we get a voice like that into the cultural discussion today.’ So really for me it was a film about the same issues I come back to again and again in my movies which is “how do we find common ground as a culture,” “what happened to all the grown-ups in our culture.” So, I’ve made a couple of films that circle these same issues but it is something I care a lot about and in America, if there is any figure who transcends partisanship then it is Fred Rogers because he was dealing with kids that zero sense of partisanship.

I’ve never seen a program like it, I didn’t know who he was until I told my Canadian wife I was doing this interview and watching the movie and her face lit up and she gave me a crash course in all of it. It bought loads of memories back for her as well which was really exciting to watch.

Did she watch it when she young?

Oh yeah. She watched it with all her sisters when they were growing up.  She was surprised when I said he didn’t really come here. I think all we had was Gordon the Gopher with Phillip Schofield on a Saturday morning, but we never had anything like Mister Rogers It was very emotional watching it with her. Did you cry when you watched it for the first time?

Well I was making it but it was very emotional to make and even when we were watching the mix back for the sound I started crying.

I don’t think you can help it. Especially that last question (when you had to think of someone). Was that always going to be your endpoint?

 No, it wasn’t. He (Fred Rogers) had done that in speeches so I just thought from the first interview I’ll ask people. I didn’t know if it was going to make it in the film, but I just thought let me try it and then it became the ending.

It is a really strong ending. It packs a punch. I could imagine if you saw it in a cinema people would be sobbing everywhere. 

The first screening we had at Sundance, because I didn’t really expect that, you know.

 It’s done really well in the States…

It has been the biggest documentary in five years in America (laughs). So, it has been a smash in America.

I think it just shows that so many people still connect with Mister Rogers and his themes which is good.

It is. It’s interesting because also a lot of people went to see the film who didn’t watch him as a kid but maybe were a  parent at the time. It’s been interesting, it has also played for liberal audiences and conservative audiences which is really rare.

He was a Republican, wasn’t he?

He was. Being a Republican meant something and there were different types of Republicans then,  particularly in Pennsylvania, there were a certain type what they call Rockefeller Republicans which is a Liberal Republican, which seems like an oxymoron now, so he was of a type that doesn’t really exist anymore. But really all of his ideas that you could consider to be liberal were based in theology. So, to him it’s not a big leap to go from won’t you be my neighbour to love thy neighbour.

Is that going to be the sequel?

[Laughs]

Was it emotional talking to the family? Were they all up for it when you purposed the documentary?

The sons had never done interviews before. They had always kept it at arm’s length.

You can tell that one looks like Fred and the one looks like his mother.

They had never done anything or talked about it and Joanne, she is amazing- his widow.  In the beginning, when I told her I wanted to make the film, I said I want to make a film not about the biography but about ideas. She said that sounds like a great idea because Fred had always said if anybody made a film out of his biography it would be the most boring film ever made. Which I don’t entirely agree with. The advice she gave me when she gave me permission to make the film was “don’t make him into a saint.”

I think you succeed with that. You made him very human.

Well, that was the thing, no ever treated him as human, they treated him as a cardboard character. I think that was frustrating for him.

Do you think that bothered him after a while?

I think when bad things happen and he had to talk, I don’t think that bothered him because I think he thought that’s when he was needed. I think the other thing is at one point he got more mail than anybody in America, and he responded to every letter he got. So, he would spend 15 hours a week doing letters.

Obviously all hand written that point.

Yeah, and for him, that was as important as the show. It was like if a child writes to me, you have to write them back and to them, that is a real relationship. Part of his thing was ‘my relationship with a child through the television is real to that child, to that child it is a real relationship’ and he also only ever talked to a single child through the lens, he was never saying ‘Hi kids, he was like, how are you today?’ So if you were a child, you thought he was talking to you. So it was a one on one relationship between you and him.

When did you start the process, are we talking years?

It was probably the very end of 2015 that I started thinking about it, and then really 2016 that we kind of put it together and started production in October 2016, just before the election.

That’s quite a quick turnaround for a documentary.

We premiered it at Sundance in 2018, so that was pretty fast.

How do you go about picking what goes in and out because there must be hours and hours of footage?

There is tons of stuff but I have been doing this long enough that I have refined my process and I feel a lot of times people who are doing archive documentary or documentaries, in general, cut a six-hour version of the film and then cut down it down to four hours, then three hours and I can’t stand doing that.

So, there are no director cuts out there or anything?

Well, there are scenes I cut out but I think the idea, in the beginning, is what is that we really want to say and what are scenes we want to talk about. I put together a list maybe 32 scenes and we cut those first and we had 100 minutes.

Was the animation always intended to go in, because that really works.

Yeah it was intended, just because I didn’t want to just talk about his childhood in an expository way ‘he did this and in this kind of house, he was born here at this time.’ I wanted his childhood to be told from his point of view in terms of how it related to the show and for it to be more in his imagination. So the only idea was to do animation and to come up with something that felt that animation I kind of based on 1940s children’s books and some Orson Welles actually, some magnificent “Ambersons” bit of lighting and things. I was really happy how it turned out.

So you grew up watching Mister Rogers, do I dare ask when that was?

I was born in ’67, the show went on in 68. So I was the first generation. Right from the beginning. Before Sesame Street, in America there was Mister Rogers, so that’s what I watched. So I love the show and I watched it every day. But I barely remember much of it because a lot of me watching that show pre-dates my memory. So it’s interesting revisiting him as an adult because you’re revisiting parts of yourself that you can’t even remember. So it accessing your earliest memories, which you don’t spend a lot of time doing in your modern life, and really trying to think about it. So, it’s all these things that are familiar that come back. You see an image and it reminds you of something.

I know you were very young, but did it teach you stuff that you have carried with you?

It must have done. And I’m sure it did with millions of people, but there is nowhere to gauge that impact which is one of those things about culture. We can’t say the culture is 10% more empathic because it watched Mister Rogers. But anecdotally, I heard story after story from people I’ve met talking about what the show meant to them. Even people who maybe didn’t have a father or had never seen an African American child on television before, or a handicapped child on television before.

That last scene of that clip when he jumps on stage, he didn’t even use the stairs.

Not even without waiting for him to get to the podium, he just jumps up there!

Why do you think this is a story worth telling?

I think its actually critical in that we live in a time where our culture has been built around divisiveness, you know people can get votes and eyeballs by pitting one group against another, stoking resentment. We live this cycle of resentment and it feels nobody is advocating for the opposite of it, reminding us that building societies takes hard work and is a fragile endeavour. So, I just feel like “who’s reminding us of the stakes here?” and what we have in common. So, for me, it was just trying to advocate for the opposite of what I see happening in our culture, in a loud way. 

Well I think it has connected, especially in America.

Well in America it has, so for me I couldn’t think of a message that I wanted to put out there more than this. It’s just my way of dealing with the past couple of years. It was a really therapeutic process to work on this film. It was hugely helpful.

When you were watching it all back did you have any favourite episodes?

Again, it was all dimly familiar and there are episodes that probably won’t mean anything to you like him visiting a crayon factory or these episodes that stuck in my mind but it was more the land of make-believe and the puppets and the trolley and all these things that were very familiar.

My wife loved the little town apparently, she wanted that town.

Oh the model, I remember being so fascinated by that. The model is there in the office and I took my picture with it.

So there are museums somewhere?

There are two museums. All in Pittsburgh. You can see a lot of the things there.

Do you think the film has merit in UK, because he wasn’t really known, but it is a global message?

I didn’t make the film thinking about it, but I’ve screened it for people including for a couple of British audiences and I’ve had a lot of Brits and people see it at festivals that had no idea who he was.

I’ve been telling people at the London Film Festival about it.

I’ve been surprised at how well it has worked for an audience for people that didn’t grow up with him. Because ultimately it is a humanist message. What he was talking about is basic human values and how to treat people and how to treat yourself.

 I can’t believe that there isn’t something on TV now which is similar.

That’s the thing, it’s like the idea he was talking about civil rights or war or hunger to two to six-year olds. Nobody has done that since.

The Bobby Kennedy footage for example.

Yeah that’s unbelievable talking about assassinations!

I’m going to have to ask about ‘They’ll love me when I’m dead’.  How did you get involved in that project?

Another passion project.

So you weren’t approached for it.

There was a book about 4 years ago called Orson Welles Last Movie by Josh Karp who became my producer on the film and when I read that book, I decided if I can ever get my hands on that Orson Welles footage, I would love to make a documentary about it because it was Welles making a film about himself essentially, shooting it for years and years.

When I was young all I knew of Orson Welles was the Transformers movie.

Exactly! So, I actually put a tiny bit of the Transformers movie into Mister Rogers movie with Orson’s voice. That was me doing an Easter egg for myself between the two films.

I love that. So I’ve guessed you have seen the new film (The Other Side Of The Wind).

Yeah I’m such a Welles fan.

Do you have a favourite film of his?

I mean it isn’t his best film, but the film I’ve always just loved was ‘Lady From Shanghai’.

I love the quote in your film when they are talking about ‘Citizen Kane’ being the greatest film ever but it isn’t even his best film.

Yeah exactly.

I guess it was a lot of fun making that.

That was great fun.

Were you making it as the same time as ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbour’?

It overlapped, but we didn’t edit at the same time. Right when I picture locked Mister Rogers we started editing Orson. That was a big gear shift going to one from the other. Although the similarity, because I thought about that this week having both films here (LFF) is that they are both people who didn’t care what other people thought about what was popular and what was good. They each had their own internal guidance for what they thought was important and what is right and wrong. As an artist that is exactly the kind of heroic figure you want, somebody who marches to their own drummer.

One last question. What is next for you?

I am working on some TV shows. I have a couple of shows for Netflix that I am doing.

That seems to be a good partnership at the moment. They are nailing it at the moment, Roma is so good.

It is! What is great is that they just give you a lot of freedom. It’s less of a burden to do a TV show than it is to do a feature. To direct a feature doc just takes so much time.

Are you going to stick to documentaries, are you not tempted to do a full length feature film?

No I love docs, I’ve been doing it for 25 years. I’m trying to find the next subject to fall in love with and part of is that I haven’t had time. I came up with Mister Rogers and Orson Welles just because I was able to read books on vacation.

So really you need a holiday to read books etc.

Yes, because there are a lot of things I’m interested in. I go on holiday and take a pile of books and I usually come away with some ideas.


We’d like to thank Morgan Neville once again for taking the time to chat with Dave whilst premiering both his new documentaries in the UK at the London Film Festival. 

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Weekend BO Report: ‘Ant-Man And The Wasp’ Flies To Number 1 On A Weekend Of Big Drops

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Written by Dapo Olowu

In a result that may be disappointing to some, but with a position that’s surprising to none, Disney’s ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’ finished its opening weekend atop the domestic Box Office charts, flying in with $75.8m — almost $50m above its closest competitor. The sequel to 2015s ‘Ant-Man’ saw a 33% boost in its first 3-days when compared to its predecessor, coming in just above MCU sequels ‘Iron Man 2’ (31%) and ‘Thor 2’ (30%), but below ‘Captain America: Winter Soldier’ (46%) and ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ (55%). It also grossed around $85m from 41 international markets, for a worldwide opening of $161m — far better than the $113.6m earned by ‘Ant-Man’ 3 years ago.

Still, there lingers a small concern that ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’ could’ve grown to even taller heights. Sure, it was the MCU’s 20th consecutive chart-topper, but tracking had the film well clear of $80m, with a potential of getting close to the century figure. Regardless, with its opening weekend audience hitting the four main quadrants relatively evenly (58% over 25, 55% male), Peyton Reed’s superhero sequel looks odds-on for a leggy summer run.

It was a close fight for second place, as just $200k separated ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ and ‘Incredibles 2’ in the Box Office standings. ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ brought in $28.6m for a domestic total of $333.4m, and a worldwide total of $1.06bn. ‘Incredibles 2’ held up well against ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’s direct audience competition, to earn $28.4m. It’s already smashed through the domestic animated record in just 4 weeks and, having earned $503.8m already, it could potentially look to be the 3rd film of the year (and just the 9th film ever) to gross $600m in the U.S. alone.

The First Purge’ earned just $17.4m in its opening 3 days, but a whopping $31.3m since Wednesday to more than double its $13m budget. It’s already just $10m behind fellow horror ‘Hereditary’, in what’s proving a very valuable year for horror movies. After ‘A Quiet Place’ made $331.3m (and counting), ‘The First Purge’ aims to finish on over $100m worldwide — and its $10.9m in international markets means it’s off to a great start.

Both ‘Sicario: Day of Soldado’ and ‘Uncle Drew’ suffered from large drops this weekend, with the former dropping by 60% in wake of its mixed critical reception. A $7.6m gross for the crime sequel was $1m over the $6.6m earned by sports comedy, ‘Uncle Drew’, which saw a 57% drop after ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’s arrival. ‘Ocean’s 8’ held steady after losing over 800 cinemas by earning $5.1m, to bring its domestic total up to $126.5m, while ‘Tag’ lost 1,000 locations on its way to make $3m this weekend. ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’ grew by 6% to earn $2.6m and become the biggest documentary of the year, leaving ‘Deadpool 2’ (which made $1.7m in its final weekend) to finish up the top ten.

What do you think? Did ‘Ant-Man and The Wasp’ fail to live up to expectations, or was this was a good opening for the film? Let us know your thoughts on Instagram and Twitter – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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Weekend BO Report: Impressive Weekend Drops Mark The End Of The Biggest Box Office Month In History!

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Written by Dapo Olowu

June 2018 saw the biggest month (and the end of the biggest quarter) in U.S. Box Office history, with the $1.268bn earned from cinema-goers beating the $1.236bn made in June 2013. This, of course, was boosted by a stunning opening from ‘Incredibles 2’ and strong showing by ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ — both of which topped the charts this weekend with further impressive runs.

It was ‘Jurassic World 2’ that predictably stomped into first place, earning $60.9m from 4,485 cinemas (in-line with our $60m estimates on Friday) for a $265.7m domestic gross. Internationally, it was a similar story, with J. A. Bayona’s flick coming in at number one for the 4th week in a row, again grossing around $60m. Its international total stands at a mighty $669m with China its biggest non-U.S. market (the $237m made there is already more than the first ‘Jurassic World’ earned in its entire Chinese run). Worldwide, ‘Jurassic World 2’ is now sitting on a comfy $934.9m and will look to be the third film of the year to break the billion-dollar-barrier by the end of the week.

Incredibles 2’ took in $46.4m domestically, leaving it just $600k short of ‘Shrek 2’ as the 2nd biggest animated film in U.S. history. Of course, it will have passed the 2004 sequel by the time you’re reading this, and will overtake ‘Finding Dory’ as the biggest ever by next week, as it draws nearer to making $700m globally. It’s a figure that crime-thriller, ‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ can only dream of reaching, but its $19m opening was a shot above even the most optimistic predictions — to place it 3rd on the U.S. Box Office charts this weekend. Not even a reduced score on Rotten Tomatoes (now at 62%) could stop this from becoming Sony’s second biggest opening of the year, behind ‘Peter Rabbit’s $25m in February. Now, all ‘Sicario 2’ needs to better its predecessor’s domestic total is a 2.47x multiplier, which would be an achievable goal if its critical reception (like its bang-average B on Cinemascore) wasn’t so mixed.

The $15.2m made in the first 3 days of sports comedy, ‘Uncle Drew’s release marks director Charles Stone III’s best ever opening, and also means a solid start for the film that cost less than $20m to produce. The release of ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ next weekend provides some unwelcome competition, but ‘Uncle Drew’ will hope to use its 67% on RT and A on Cinemascore to hold its own against the MCU tentpole. ‘Ocean’s 8’ sneaked over the $200m global figure this weekend after dropping just 28% from last weekend, earning $8.3m in the U.S. Similarly, ‘Tag’ dropped by only 29% to gross $5.9m. It’s currently at a $41.1m domestic total, and lies just $2m short of $50m worldwide.

Now into its seventh weekend, ‘Deadpool 2’ grossed $3.6m to reach $310.5m domestically, trailing ‘Deadpool’ by $52m. Surprisingly, Bollywood film ‘Sanju’ grossed $2.7m from just 356 cinemas, giving it the 3rd best per-cinema average of the weekend, with $7,650. The biographical flick is based around Indian film veteran Sanjay Dutt, who has starred in over 180 movies. Finally, ‘Solo’ and ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ round off the top ten with $2.7m and $2.4m alike.

With Ant-Man 2 entering cinemas next week, which of these do you think will be hit the hardest? Let us know your thoughts on Instagram and Twitter – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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Weekend BO Predictions: ‘Uncle Drew’ And ‘Sicario 2’ Go To War In Tightly Contested Weekend

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Written by Dapo Olowu

There’s going to be a battle for third place in the U.S. Box Office this weekend as sports comedy ‘Uncle Drew’ looks to play ball against ‘Sicario 2’, the eagerly awaited sequel to Denis Villeneuve’s 2015 crime thriller ‘Sicario’. Both will take a backseat to J. A. Bayona’s ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ however, with the dinosaur epic looking to endure a more frustrating run than its 2015 predecessor. A drop close to 60% would still earn ‘Jurassic World 2’, the 3rd biggest film of the year so far, a pretty monstrous $60m, but it’s a far-cry from the $106.6m that Trevorrow’s ‘Jurassic World’ made just 3 years ago.

Incredibles 2’, on the other hand, is rapidly closing in on ‘The Incredibles’ worldwide total of $633m, as it looks to break through the $600m barrier by the end of the weekend. Domestically, a $45.8m gross this weekend would see it keep second place and near a $450m total, enough to become the second biggest animated film of all time in the U.S.

Stefano Sollima’s ‘Sicario 2’ can only wish for a similar performance – the first only opened to $12.1m in wide release, for a $46.9m domestic total off of a $30m budget. Director Denis Villeneuve doesn’t return this time around, alongside household name Emily Blunt, and Oscar-nominee Daniel Kaluuya. It does though see the return of Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro, alongside acclaimed writer Taylor Sheridan of ‘Wind River’ and ‘Hell or High Water’ fame. An opening close to $20m would be a solid start, but critical reception pales in comparison to ‘Sicario’, with the sequel holding a decent 72% on the Tomatometer, compared to the first’s 93%. A gross just over $16m should therefore be on the cards.

Following closely is ‘Uncle Drew’, starring NBA superstar Kyrie Irving in the titular role. The comedy, based on his character from Pepsi Max adverts, also stars ‘Get Out’ actor Lil Rel Howery, as well as Nick Kroll, Shaquille O’Neal, and Tiffany Haddish. The presence of Haddish automatically draws comparisons between the film and last year’s breakout comedy ‘Girls Trip’, which opened to huge $31.2m, and finished on $115.2m domestically. However, ‘Uncle Drew’ doesn’t have the critical acclaim (50% on RT vs. 90%), nor the specific charm that ‘Girls Trip’ offered. A closer comparison would be to 2016s ‘Barbershop: The Next Cut’s $20.2m opening, meaning ‘Uncle Drew’ should be close to ‘Sicario 2’ this weekend by earning around $16m.

Also keeping its place in the top ten is ‘Ocean’s 8’ which looks to close in on ‘Ocean’s Thirteen’s domestic total with a $7.5m gross this weekend. Comedy ‘Tag’ may endure a bit of audience competition from the two new entries, and should earn just under $5m to continue a pretty poor year for comedies. ‘Deadpool 2’ sets to continue its trend of 40% weekend drops by pulling in $3.2m, while ‘Solo’ in theory should bounce back after being hit hard by ‘Jurassic World’ 7 days ago, for a gross of $2.7m. Finally, we round the weekend out with ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ and ‘Hereditary’; the former looks to perform similarly to documentary ‘RBG’ earlier this year to earn $1.9m from its limited release, while the latter will pull in close to $1.8m.

Who do you think will win the battle for third place between ‘Sicario 2’ and ‘Uncle Drew’? Let us know your thoughts on Twitter and Instagram – we’re at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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Weekend BO Report: A Blistering June Weekend Sees ‘Fallen Kingdom’ In A World Of Its Own

Written by Dapo Olowu

On the biggest June Box Office weekend in domestic history, it was ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ that snatched first place with a remarkable $148m 3-day haul. Early tracking, like with ‘Jurassic World’ in 2015, saw a much more conservative $130m figure being touted by industry analysts, as well as yours truly. But, it’s becoming increasingly clear that the franchise relies heavily on on-the-day walk-ups – pre-orders and heavy anticipation just isn’t the audience preference here. This means that the duo of films, led by Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard, have become Universal’s first and second highest openings of all time (with the former pulling in a then-record $208.8m), showing that audiences in the U.S. still have a mighty appetite for the Dinosaur franchise. The same can be said for International viewers, as ‘Fallen Kingdom’ now boasts a mighty $715m global gross and is looking at finishing in the region of $1.2bn worldwide.

Flying in for a second place finish this weekend is ‘Incredibles 2’, Pixar’s record-breaking sequel. Unfortunately, it cut our dreams of a $100m 1-2 in the Box Office short, bringing in a smaller but still solid, $80.3m. The interesting bit here is the similarities in its weekend drop to both ‘Infinity War’ and ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’, whose 55.5% falls almost mirror ‘Incredibles 2’s 56%, indicating that the Brad Bird-directed hit may end up performing more like an archetypal superhero movie than a family-oriented Pixar animation. A box office run like ‘Infinity War’ would earn ‘Incredibles 2’ a domestic finish of $475m, while a run like ‘GotG2’ leaves the film at $485.9m. Disney and Pixar will be optimistic for a stronger performance, though, as the summer period should see it beat ‘Finding Dory’s record of $486.3m. Internationally, ‘Incredibles 2’ fared especially well in China, earning a Pixar-record $21.2m in the region.

A gross of $11.5m leaves Sandra Bullock’s ‘Ocean’s 8’ on a domestic total of $100.3m, and a worldwide gross of $171.6m – a fantastic return after just 3 weeks. As the film closes in on $200m, and critical reaction stands to be mostly positive, a possible sequel is looking more and more likely. True-story comedy ‘Tag’ has managed to take in $8.3m to bring its domestic total up to $30.4m – on-track with last month’s Melissa McCarthy comedy ‘Life of the Party’. The former will hope to better the $52.1m domestic total that the latter ended up on, as ‘Tag’s inflated $28m production cost requires a leggier Box Office run.

Deadpool 2’ triumphed over ‘Solo’ this weekend, earning $5.3m compared to the latter’s $4.5m, moving past ‘It’ as the 3rd biggest R-rated global hit (behind ‘The Matrix Reloaded’ and ‘Deadpool’). ‘Solo’ was hit a little hard by ‘Fallen Kingdom’, dropping 55% from last week’s gross. On the other hand, ‘Hereditary’ held steady after losing 1,000 cinemas, earning $3.6m  and leaving it just $2m short of $50m globally. The A24 film will be confident at landing somewhere close to $60m worldwide; a fantastic return for the studio with a patchy Box Office record to date.

Sony action film, ‘Superfly’, dropped by 50% from last weekend to gross $3.4m – a figure similar to Tyrese Gibson thriller, ‘Waist Deep’, from 2006, which also saw a $3.4m second weekend. While the latter’s $21.3m domestic total looks reachable for ‘Superfly’, it’ll be a disappointing run for the film that cost $16m. Finally, ‘Infinity War’ earned $2.6m in its final weekend in the top 10, while limited-release documentary ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbour’ brought in $1.8m for 10th spot.

As worldwide audiences can’t seem to get enough of the ‘Jurassic’ franchise, where do you the current film ending up? Will it break into the top ten biggest of all time? Let us know your thoughts – we’re on Instagram and Twitter at @JUMPCUT_ONLINE.

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